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Old 01-07-2011, 04:05 PM   #21
coolstoryangus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ibanezgod1973
don`t drink alcohol or consume mind altering drugs (if you are into that crap) before your set. you will fumble most of the gig and you`ll get a reputation of amateur alcoholics or druggies, you will gain a bad reputation and will never be taken seriously.

Good thread.
Although i find one or two drinks before a gig is good for calming the nerves and it doesnt affect your playing that much.. not for me anyway i play better generally cause im not completely crapping it
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Old 01-07-2011, 04:14 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by ibanezgod1973
don`t drink alcohol or consume mind altering drugs (if you are into that crap) before your set. you will fumble most of the gig and you`ll get a reputation of amateur alcoholics or druggies, you will gain a bad reputation and will never be taken seriously.


^Yes! I was waiting for someone to post this. Do NOT show up at the gig loaded. The days of people (and your employers) laughing that one off are long gone.

Also, do not ever leave expensive gear or instruments backstage or in the truck outside unattended. It won't be there when you finish your set.

Do not overlook potentially serious issues and say "Oh, what the hell. We'll just live with it." I recall an incident with a bad ground that caused the main vocal mic to shock the singer. He thought it was no big deal. About 3/4 of the way through the first set, he found out how wrong he was.

Just a couple of things to look out for.
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Old 01-07-2011, 04:46 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by coolstoryangus
Good thread.
Although i find one or two drinks before a gig is good for calming the nerves and it doesnt affect your playing that much.. not for me anyway i play better generally cause im not completely crapping it


I agree with this. Alcohol is a social lubricant. I know when I tried out for my first band, I was nervous as hell, I had a beer and it really helped calm me down and play a little more natural.
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omfg i totally forgot about that, you sir are jesus christ.
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Old 01-07-2011, 04:50 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by FatalGear41
^Yes! I was waiting for someone to post this. Do NOT show up at the gig loaded. The days of people (and your employers) laughing that one off are long gone.

Also, do not ever leave expensive gear or instruments backstage or in the truck outside unattended. It won't be there when you finish your set.

Do not overlook potentially serious issues and say "Oh, what the hell. We'll just live with it." I recall an incident with a bad ground that caused the main vocal mic to shock the singer. He thought it was no big deal. About 3/4 of the way through the first set, he found out how wrong he was.

Just a couple of things to look out for.

i couldn't agree more with this.

my band fired our lead singer about 6 months ago - we arranged to play at an open mic night in order to see how people would react to us as we had not gigged before. the singer turned up completely wasted and at the end of the 2nd song, stumbled sideways across the stage and crashed through the stage door into the dressing room. needless to say it was the first and the last time that guy performed with us.
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Old 01-07-2011, 04:52 PM   #25
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I don't think it can be said enough: if you are nice to your sound man, he will be nice to you.

Also, remember that the more musicians you have on stage, the more sonic space is being taken. Try not to intrude on someone else. For example, my band is currently a 5 piece with:
1) guitarist/ vocalist (me)
2) guitarist/ pedal steele
3) bassist
4) keyboardist
4) drums
the guitars is set pretty bright (but not as bright as the pedal steel) so as to not compete with the bass sound. Likewise, my Rick and Vox don't compete with his blonde Bassman and 335.

Don't use more pedals than necessary. Things WILL go wrong and trouble shooting a huge board is a pain in the ass. I'm pretty pleased with my Pedaltrain Nano and Jrs.

Be nice to the bands you're sharing the bill with/don't be a dick. I was playing a local show with another fairly well known local band and a few newer acts. We went on second to last. The band preceding us was newer and had an ok set, but when the singer got off stage he said "Good luck following THAT." That level of douche infuriated us. My band -- comprised of pretty seasoned musicians (2 studio guys, one guy with a degree in music, and one who has clocked well over 1000 gigs, and a keyboardist) -- then blew the roof off and gave the asshole a lesson in humility.


Unfortunately, I tend to show up to most gigs fairly intoxicated. Not so drunk that I can't play, but drunk enough that I'm not nervous. ha.
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Old 01-07-2011, 05:07 PM   #26
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This isn't a rule you should follow, but an idea if you want to tighten up your live show, have a 'standard order' of songs on your set list and modify it when you write new songs so you can get the most out of the gig by tactically placing your songs (fast opener, ballads in the middle, long epic song to end with). Try not to have 2 similar sounding songs close together, mix it up a bit. You can also plan out when you change guitars or change tuning.

If you play loads of shows with the same or similar setlists after a while you won't be worrying about what song is next and if you go for ages without rehearsing, you still have some idea what you are doing.

There is a reason why bands tour the same set list night after night, again it is just something my band uses, if playing radically different set lists at each gig works for you, stick with it.
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Old 01-07-2011, 05:29 PM   #27
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^I had the hardest time convincing my band to stick to a setlist. I don't know why.


I don't think there's anything wrong with intoxication. Like most things, you just have to know your limits. Don't get wasted. Don't get incapacitated. But don't be afraid to have a good time.
I play a little more energetically with maybe two beers inside me. Just loosen it up and feel less robotic.
However, I know I don't feel comfortable with more than a pitcher of beer in me.
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Old 01-07-2011, 05:47 PM   #28
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I can't add anything for bigger gigs and the like, but from my very limited experience:

1. Make sure everything is switched on BEFORE you start (I could have sworn my amp was on...).
2. Never let anyone that isn't actually involved in the gig near the equipment, things WILL get knocked over, levels and settings messed up etc.
3. Involve and interact with the crowd. It just helps with the atmosphere.
4. This is going to sound really cliché, but ENJOY IT. Playing live is brilliant!
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Old 01-07-2011, 05:47 PM   #29
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Yay it's finally up!

Thanks for taking the initiative Brett!
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Old 01-07-2011, 05:48 PM   #30
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One of my biggest pet peeves is when bands stop during there set to talk, whether it's introducing the band, talking about the crowd, or telling the story of how a song was written.

The less you talk through the microphone the better. People want to hear music not your life story. Nothing irritates me more than hearing:

"Well...., um.... a...., we're *microphonic feedback*, sorry about that..., we're Generic Rock Band Name and.... well... uh... we're... a rock band and we're here to play some... uh... rock music... and.... well, I hope you like us and, um... a... thats about it."

Remember: Less Talk, More Rock.

Also: it's a good idea to introduce your band at the end of your set instead of the beginning because then people will remember it and the people who stayed until the end of your set are the people who like your music (or are waiting for the next band).
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Old 01-07-2011, 05:52 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kangaxxter
Also: it's a good idea to introduce your band at the end of your set instead of the beginning because then people will remember it and the people who stayed until the end of your set are the people who like your music (or are waiting for the next band).


Or during your last song, go into a quiet section and introduce each band member during the song and each member gets their own 8 or whatever bar solo whilst everyone cheers then go into the next section of the song.
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Old 01-07-2011, 05:56 PM   #32
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My favorite is when people decide that the time to start rambling is AFTER the last song. "Buy our merch...thanks for coming..this is our website....we're recording a demo...I like pancakes.."

The words are "Thank you and good night!"

Get it right people.
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Old 01-07-2011, 05:58 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GezzyDiversion
Or during your last song, go into a quiet section and introduce each band member during the song and each member gets their own 8 or whatever bar solo whilst everyone cheers then go into the next section of the song.


Yeah, I've seen that done before, but I've also seen bands mess it up pretty badly. One of the good ones I've seen was a seven (I think) piece ska band. The singer just straight up introduced himself and the rhythm section (Bass, Drums, Guitar), then each of the horn players got their own 8 bars. I used to roadie for them, and I can seen you a recording of it, if you want to hear how it worked.
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Old 01-07-2011, 06:00 PM   #34
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My favorite is when people decide that the time to start rambling is AFTER the last song. "Buy our merch...thanks for coming..this is our website....we're recording a demo...I like pancakes.."

The words are "Thank you and good night!"

Get it right people.



A MEN! dude for serious.
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Old 01-07-2011, 06:25 PM   #35
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Also, a torch with fresh batteries is a must have at a gig, so many times have I had to set up in the dark between bands and things fall behind the amps or I could see what I'm plugging the speaker lead into etc.

It kinda makes sense. Dark room, need light?
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Old 01-08-2011, 12:38 AM   #36
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Here's just some of my advice for gigging.

1. Don't settle for anything but exactly what you want in the monitor mix. Seriously. We played this one show where the sound guy asked our singer if he could hear himself. He answered "yeah it's ok." He ended up not being able to hear himself and was flat the whole show. If you can't hear yourself or need to have something adjusted, tell the sound guy, not being a dick about it, to adjust the levels in an affirmative manner. Also, if you don't get a very long sound check and you can't hear yourself or someone else in the band during the first song, don't finish the set like that. Tell the sound guy. Hearing yourself is probably the most important thing.

2. Bring a rug or carpet for drums. You have no idea if the stage will have carpet or if there is even a drum riser. Bring a carpet or else your bass drum WILL move. Trust me. Our drummer forgot his carpet and his bass drum slid and the mic sliced the head.

3. Make friends with good/popular bands. Pretty self-explanatory. This might get you more gigs in the future.

4. Try to keep songs in the same tuning together. For example, if you play in a band where half of your set is in drop d and the other is in standard, don't play a song in drop d, one in standard, another one in drop d, and 2 in standard. Play all the songs in drop d together and all the standard songs together. The audience wants to hear more music not watching you switch guitars/tune up or down.

5. BE PROFESSIONAL! Make sure nobody in your band is a jerk. My band opened for a band called Sparks the Rescue (really good pop punk band), and one of the bands who played before us got WAY too carried away. The singer during sound check just cursed nonstop into his mic and during the show acted like he was some big shot saying "come closer guys you won't get pregnant." Considering they were a new local band who wasn't very good, I'd say they didn't leave a good impression on anyone.

6. Don't talk too much on stage and don't talk more than you play. LESS TALK MORE ROCK. However, don't be timid. If you say "Hey we're so and so and this song is called this" then people will get bored and you will lose the audience's attention no matter how good you are. Also, a good tip is to engage the audience (hand clapping, singing along, requesting pits). They will have more fun and you will keep their attention.

7. This goes with number 6. Get into your music! If you just stand there, you will lose the audience and they will be bored. But if you get into your songs and have good stage presence, then you will get more attention from the audience. The most important thing I learned (from my cousin who tours almost all year) is that about 90% of what people hear is what they see. Unless you are some musical critic or something this will usually be true. I screw up all the time and if you jump around and look loose and confident then almost no one will notice. Also, it doesn't kill to smile or look happy. Last thing is look up at the audience every once in a while. Make eye contact with the crowd not the fret markers on your instrument.

8. For singers who don't use mic stands, invest in a good mic and cable and tape them together (this mainly applies to pop punk/screamo bands). Makes your mic look cool and the cable won't fall out of the mic if you step on it.

9. Invest in a wireless system. Not a bad idea for bands that jump around a lot.

10. Hang out with the crowd/your fans after the show. This can be the money making opportunity if you have merch and will also let you connect with fans/make new fans/show that you're not a douche.

11. It never kills to play a cover everyone knows. My band always plays the middle by Jimmy Eat World. Not because it's a song WE like but because EVERYONE knows this song.

12. GET A PEDAL TUNER IF YOU DON'T ALREADY HAVE ONE.

13. Practice your set AT LEAST a month in advance and plan everything you will do onstage. This includes choreography, what you will say, when you will switch guitars/basses or tune up or down.

I didn't read everyone's responses so if something has already been covered I'm sorry!

Last edited by glamourkilledme : 01-08-2011 at 10:57 AM.
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Old 01-08-2011, 07:11 AM   #37
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^^^ This is a great post. ^^^

Another bit of advice, make sure you know EXACTLY what you're doing, when you're doing it etc. Its all well and good trying to wing it and see what happens as you go along, but it will go wrong. Trust me on this, I've been there.

Being prepared is basically everything.
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Old 01-08-2011, 10:56 AM   #38
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Being prepared is basically everything.



SOOO true!
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Old 01-09-2011, 03:18 PM   #39
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This is turning into epic threaddddd.....


Im' off to the studio, maybe we'll have a studio tips thread
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Old 01-09-2011, 03:32 PM   #40
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Awesome thread. We definitely needed something like this!

Likewise it's always good to help other bands unload their gear or lend them a battery/cable etc if they're in trouble. They will remember you and hopefully when you need help you will have those guys to help you!
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