Go Back   UG Community @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com > Music > Recordings
User Name  
Password
Search:

Reply
Old 03-16-2011, 09:41 AM   #1
Jehannum
Registered Abuser
 
Jehannum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Birmingham, England
Suggest a good 8 track recorder

I'm a bedroom guitarist who writes songs and instrumental music for my own pleasure (and, some would say, other people's annoyance). I use an old 4 track cassette multi-track recorder. As I'm progressing I find I don't like the limitation of 4 tracks, and I don't like the tape hiss.

I want to upgrade to a digital 8 track recorder.

A few criteria:

- I prefer knobs and faders to menu systems

- Bass, midrange and treble adjustment required

- I'd like TRUE 8 track independence

- It doesn't need to provide drum sounds, only to record the sounds I feed into it faithfully

- Preferably USB 2 connectivity

- Budget range: 250 - 500 (UK pounds)

Is this the right kind of kit for me - or is there a better way of doing this? I won't consider software solutions because of the delay on my soundcard. And I want a piece of physical kit!

I'd appreciate any recommendations on what to go for or what to avoid.
Jehannum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2011, 09:47 AM   #2
Sparky-MMA
UG's Ginger
 
Sparky-MMA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: the land of manc
where are you. i have a boss br200 that i'm looking to get shot of, i'll take 60 quid for it
__________________
i'm Ginger its fun
Sparky-MMA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2011, 09:48 AM   #3
TechnicolorType
<33333333334567
 
TechnicolorType's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
erm why do you want a recorder?

you can do much better.
get an interface.
unlimited tracks that can be manipulated and edited right in front of your face with next to endless possibilities and flexibility and more than possible professional results.

an interface comes with its own soundcard and your PC soundcard won't even interact with it so you don't have to worry about a delay.

Focusrite, M Audio, Presonus are some companies that make great interfaces for well under your budget and all throughout your budget.

If all you want to record is guitar then you don't need something too much, but if you'd like something high-end then all means go for it.

For your budget you could get a decent setup though.

You mentioned drums - Addictive Drums, Seven Slate Drums, EZDrummer, and Superior Drummer can get you some good high quality sounds.
I believe those all fall around 100-200.

Focusrite Saffire 6 is about 125 new and is a great interface. There's also higher models by the number that could appeal to you as well, the most high-end one being the Saffire 40 at 310 and a very fine piece of gear. (then there's a 24 and maybe a 12 or 14 that fall in the middle of those two prices)

You could also get some good monitors if you don't already have them. It isn't hard to find good ones for a pretty low price.

If you need a DAW then Reaper is great since it's as professional as it gets and extremely cheap/ you can evaluate it forever without paying a dime.

All you really need is an interface, a DAW, and you're set for recording any instrument. (of course you'll need a mic if you want to mic anything up. but unless you have a good tube amp then don't bother. an SM57 is all you'd need in that case anyways) You can get any other instrument sounds like drums, piano, etc. for free (though there are plenty of paid options that might do the job better.)

Last edited by TechnicolorType : 03-16-2011 at 09:53 AM.
TechnicolorType is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2011, 09:50 AM   #4
jpatan
UG's only REAL Llama
 
jpatan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Planet Urf
I just ordered a Boss BR-800, it arrives today, I'll let you know how it does. I bought it because it acts as a recording interface for your computer as well, so I think that will cancel out the latency problem. Then when I go jam with friends, I can take it with me.

It has a dedicated rhythm track, but I think it's sort of a novelty, and doesn't sound very good. But you don't have to use it either.

It has USB connection, and can even be powered via USB.

I'm not sure what you mean by TRUE 8 track independance....

Will record 4 tracks at once, has 4 XLR / line inputs.

Seems to be a pretty solid unit, but like I said, I haven't actually unboxed it yet. I'll do some recording asap and let you know my impression.

It's also worth mentioning that this will be my first digital recorder. I also have an ancient tape 4 track, but I've hardly used it because I found recording to tape to be very frustrating, and the sound quality wasn't very good.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by tubetime86
He's obviously pretty young, and I'd guess he's being raised by wolves, or at least humans with the intellectual capacity and compassion of wolves.


You finally made it home, draped in the flag that you fell for.
And so it goes
jpatan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2011, 10:28 AM   #5
von Layzonfon
UG's Grammar Stickler
 
von Layzonfon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: 22 Acacia Avenue
I generally concur with T-Type.

You might also want to take a look at the Zoom R16 (http://www.zoom.co.jp/english/products/r16/) - it's an 8-track recorder (actually, 16, with up to 8 simultaneous recording) onto SD cards, but can also be used as an interface and a control surface for your DAW. I've had one for a while and it's a great bit of kit and well within your budget.

+1 for Reaper, BTW.
von Layzonfon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2011, 10:50 AM   #6
Jehannum
Registered Abuser
 
Jehannum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Birmingham, England
Thanks for the information so far guys. I didn't even know of the existence of an 'interface', so I'll investigate these. I've only just started playing guitar after a 10 year hiatus, so much of the tech has left me behind.
Jehannum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2011, 10:54 AM   #7
TechnicolorType
<33333333334567
 
TechnicolorType's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
yeaah, I know what you mean. I used to think you needed lots of expensive equipment to get good recording results but over the past year or two (in this forum) I've learned a simple interface is plenty.
TechnicolorType is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2011, 07:11 PM   #8
timbit2006
UG Monkey
 
timbit2006's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Kelowna, B.C. Canada
If you have a decent computer with Firewire(This is a must for this interface) I reccomend the Presonus FP10.
Could you check if you have a Firewire port and post the specs of your computer?
__________________
--Tyrone the White from Canada.
timbit2006 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2011, 07:02 AM   #9
Jehannum
Registered Abuser
 
Jehannum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Birmingham, England
No, it's a laptop - an Acer Aspire 5532, 4GB RAM, 1.2 GHz AMD Athlon 64 X2 processor. It doesn't have a Firewire, just USB 2. Windows 7

I'm thinking the M Audio Fast Track Pro might be worth a look.

Below is how I currently create demos. How would this change when using the Fast Track Pro?

1. Create a drum / bass backing with Guitar Pro 6

2. Record the drum / bass backing onto a track on my 4 track tape recorder.

3. Plug my guitar into my amplifier, which is miked up to another track of the 4 track recorder.

4. Play the backing track and record the guitar onto the 4 track recorder.

5. Repeat step 4 for other guitar parts and vocals.

6. Connect the output of the 4 track recorder to the input of the computer and use Audacity to capture all of the tracks.

Cheers.
Jehannum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2011, 07:26 AM   #10
jpatan
UG's only REAL Llama
 
jpatan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Planet Urf
I got my BR-800 last night, and actually had time to mess with it for about an hour. It works really well. I have it running into my PC via USB, and recording in reaper (which I also just downloaded last night). Zero latency, and the sound quality is fantastic.

I'm not sure if you'd be able to just import the drum and bass directly to reaper to avoid step 2 altogether, but worst case you could send it out to a track and then bounce it back into reaper (that is, if you're still looking to get an actual recorder, and not just an interface). I like having an actual recorder, because there are times when I go jam with other people, and being able to record our sessions is pretty cool. Having something I can unplug and take along with me is pretty handy.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by tubetime86
He's obviously pretty young, and I'd guess he's being raised by wolves, or at least humans with the intellectual capacity and compassion of wolves.


You finally made it home, draped in the flag that you fell for.
And so it goes
jpatan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2011, 08:11 AM   #11
von Layzonfon
UG's Grammar Stickler
 
von Layzonfon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: 22 Acacia Avenue
Like jpatan, I like the fact that I can use the Zoom to record all by itself (both it and the Boss will run on batteries, I believe) - so I can plonk myself in any room I like, plug in my guitar (there's a Hi-Z input and built-in FX, so I don't need to be amped & miked) and headphones, and lay down as many tracks as I like. When I'm done, I can whip out the SD card and import the tracks onto a PC and continue working with them.

However, similar to jpatan, I also use mine with my band, so the extra inputs are essential, and not having to be hooked to a computer to record is a boon. Given your workflow, and if you don't mind having to record on your laptop, the M-Audio unit you've found should do the trick. The only difference would be that rather than recording to another track on your 4-track, you'd be opening up another track in your recording software.

With regard to the drum & bass tracks, either GPro6 will allow you to render the tracks as audio (WAV, MP3, whatever) or, if it were me, I'd export them as MIDI then import the MIDI tracks into Reaper (or other DAW), where they'll happily run alongside your imported/recorded audio. Of course you'll need to find some D&B VSTis to run the MIDI tracks through but there are loads out there (try http://www.kvraudio.com/get.php as a starting point).
von Layzonfon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2011, 06:44 PM   #12
robfalcon501
Gimme that beer
 
robfalcon501's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Akron, Ohio
forget the digital recording, Build a decent computer, download the recording DAWs for free and VSTs and get a cheap decent interface
__________________
Check Out My Youtube Channel http://www.youtube.com/user/Robfalcon501
robfalcon501 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2011, 07:53 PM   #13
jpatan
UG's only REAL Llama
 
jpatan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Planet Urf
Yeah I was just fiddling around with reaper and guitar pro 6, and it's very easy to import whole midi files, so no need to bounce tracks back and forth. If you don't have any drum and bass VST's you can even export drum tracks out of GP6 as .wav, and add the files into your reaper project as a new track.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by tubetime86
He's obviously pretty young, and I'd guess he's being raised by wolves, or at least humans with the intellectual capacity and compassion of wolves.


You finally made it home, draped in the flag that you fell for.
And so it goes
jpatan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2011, 09:38 PM   #14
strangedogs
An Old Dude with an AX...
 
strangedogs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: North Florida
Quote:
Originally Posted by robfalcon501
forget the digital recording, Build a decent computer, download the recording DAWs for free and VSTs and get a cheap decent interface


Exactly. Unlimited potential and unlimited tweaking possible.
__________________
Now running an Eleven Rack with Pro Tools 10.3.3 - it's amazing and I'm having ball with it - worth every penny. PT 10 is tops IMO and the Eleven Rack is a work of art!
strangedogs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2011, 06:27 AM   #15
jpatan
UG's only REAL Llama
 
jpatan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Planet Urf
Quote:
Originally Posted by robfalcon501
forget the digital recording, Build a decent computer, download the recording DAWs for free and VSTs and get a cheap decent interface


Except the "build a decent computer" part also costs money... Sometimes a lot. Plus not everyone knows how to build one. I built my current PC, but most of the people I know would never even attempt it. So adding in the cost of a decent PC setup you're talking somewhere in the neighborhood of $700-1,300 including a decent interface, whether you build it yourself, what DAW you buy / "trial" / pirate / whatever, any VST's you get... it adds up fast. I built my PC a couple years ago, re-using the case and a few other parts from my previous PC, and it STILL ended up costing me about $1k.

If you have a decent PC already, then it's probably the best way to go for recording at your house, but when you need some portability a standalone is the only option. Even better, a standalone that doubles as a PC interface for when you are at home.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by tubetime86
He's obviously pretty young, and I'd guess he's being raised by wolves, or at least humans with the intellectual capacity and compassion of wolves.


You finally made it home, draped in the flag that you fell for.
And so it goes
jpatan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2011, 11:42 AM   #16
axemanchris
Awwww.... NOW what?!
 
axemanchris's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
Any off-the-shelf computer will do fine for basic audio recording. And while it used to be true that building your own computer could be done for cheaper than buying one, that is not true anymore.

If you really want to save money, maybe buy a computer that is a year or two old. It will be perfectly fine.

Otherwise.... we bought a computer about a year ago that included a 21" LCD monitor (all new) for about $600. It runs Windows 7 just fine. I can't remember what's in it, but it beats the pants off the computer that I gave to my kids, which is the same one we used to record our album about 4 years ago. It is a Celeron 1.7 Ghz machine with about 1.5 GB RAM. We recorded each song upwards to 36 tracks of 24 bit audio with appropriate processing. My new studio beast (haha), I got used about a year and a half ago for about $200. I had to put some more RAM in it, but it's something like 2.5 Ghz (intel - single core) with now 2GB RAM or something around there running Win7.

CT
__________________
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Quote:
Originally Posted by firehawk
Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
axemanchris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2011, 01:15 PM   #17
TechnicolorType
<33333333334567
 
TechnicolorType's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Chris is right. I can even record on my like 200 dollar piece of rubbish that has 500mb of ram. lololol.
it'll start slowing down after a bunch of big vsts. (like two or three ozones, etc) but otherwise it can work. I don't record on it but if I needed to then I would.
TechnicolorType is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:43 AM.

Forum Archives / About / Terms of Use / Advertise / Contact / Ultimate-Guitar.Com © 2014
Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.