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Old 06-22-2012, 05:39 PM   #21
jazz_rock_feel
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Originally Posted by griffRG7321
I had a read of that in the library in between lectures last year and promptly put it back on the shelf.

It's more of a historical document at this point than anything else.

These are a bit more specialized, but notation books are extremely useful. Gardner Read's Music Notation is amazing, Kurt Stone's Music Notation in the 20th Century is quality (I don't own it, but have used it) and a really good one for me is Music Engraving Today: The Art and Practice of Digital Notesetting by Steven Powell which is less about how to notate and more about the minutiae of setting a score, with standard dimensions, paper weights, margins, proofreading and editing etc. It's also the only engraving book made since the PC was invented.
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Old 06-22-2012, 06:03 PM   #22
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At the risk of running out of space I'm thinking you could edit those into your first post in this thread seeing as it's the second post and I forgot to reserve posts like the clumsy fool that I am

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Old 06-22-2012, 07:03 PM   #23
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Done G-sizzle.
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Old 08-05-2012, 02:08 PM   #24
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I've got 2 nice books, but they are both written by dutch Conservatory graduates, and are not available in English

1 book is purely on harmony, and goes from basic harmony all the way up to the augmented 6th chords and their uses and basic counterpoint.

The other is a complete small dictionary, with a history on music, and a complete glossary of music terms in English German and Italian. This book also puts jazz and classical side to side at the subjects to compare notation, and stylistic ornamentations etc.

It also has info on old dances and musical forms like the beguine, musette, gaillarde krakowiak, loure, passacaglia, pavane, berceuse etc.

Also, the Jazz theory book by Mark Levine is a nice book to go through, if only for the notated repertoire of many known and unknown jazz greats.
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Old 08-07-2012, 05:10 PM   #25
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heres my shortish list of stuff I've used for myself/taught (definitly not finished everything, or even a majority of this stuff, but most of it can be gotten online for free and then leafed through at your leasure).

general guitar
the advancing guitarist
a modern method for guitar (all three)
solo guitar playing (the Noad book)
the aaron shearer technique supplements (used in small doses)
Technique of the saxophone: Scale and chord studies (joe viola, great studies for ear-hand co-ordination on any instrument).

reading
rhythms complete by bugs brouwer/melodic rhythms for guitar
bop duets by bugs brouwer
the Dufrense sightreading book
Sight reading for guitar 1 and 2 (William Leavitt)
Wolfhart and Kreutzer violin etudes, and Arbans charecteristic studies (dont buy the whole book, but you can probably find them on IMSLP).

jazz and theory stuff
The Jazz Theory Book
How to Play Jazz and Improvise and some other Aebersolds (specifically getting it together, the jazz ear training book and the one on Dominant cycles)
Linear Harmony and Comprehensive technique for jazz musicians (both Bert Ligon)
Hal Crooks How to Improvise/comp
Contemporary Harmony-Romantism through the 12 tone row (Ludmilla Uhela)
Hearing and Writing Music
Micky Baker's course in jazz guitar (great for getting off the ground with jazz, though very very basic and old school)
Three note voicings for guitar (a more modern method that still starts very basic. goes well with the micky baker text)
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Old 08-31-2012, 09:30 AM   #26
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If I'm honest I thought Fux was a waste of my time and money (not your fault, btw, I bought him because of all the Amazon recommends - more fool me, huh) - a bit like trying to learn science from an 18th century alchemist. Sure the general thrust of the thing might be there but the explanation was, um, wandering at best.

I mainly learned counterpoint from Schoenberg's "Preliminary Exercises In Counterpoint", Butterworth's information on voice-leading and Gauldin's book (below).

As you said - Schoenberg is fine if you're prepared either to put up with, or get to know soprano, alto and tenor clefs. It's not a modern guide so some of the language is a bit old-fashioned and I remember there being occasional passages where I didn't think it was entirely clear what he meant (although I couldn't quote these to you verbatim) but overall it got the general gist of the idea across and had enough exercises for me to work through what he was saying on my own.

If you're after something a bit more specialised, and a little more focussed on structure rather than the basics of counterpoint, I'd recommend:

Classical
A Practical Approach to Eighteenth-Century Counterpoint - Robert Gauldin. This is more a college text than an introduction but if you want to get to grips with 18th century counterpoint and write in that style it's well worth a read. There are plenty of examples to work through on your own and lots of lovely Bach to wade through.

Composition
Musical Composition - Reginald Smith Brindle. A short and sweet introduction to composition that's great for beginners and a concise reference guide for everyone else.

The Composer's Handbook - Bruce Cole. A guide to composition aimed at children doing their GCSEs. What it lacks in depth it gains in clarity and apposite musical examples.


History of Music

A History of Western Music - J. Peter Burkholder, Donald Grout & Claude Palisca.
Oxford History of Western Music - Richard Taruskin.

Both these books cover the entirety of Western Art music from its beginnings to the modern day. There are varying opinions as to the success of either book - some more partisan than others. My personal opinion is that they are pretty much as good as one another. Either one can be bought with or without its Recorded Anthology containing all the musical examples from the books. Although the recorded anthologies are quite pricey they are far cheaper than trying to buy individual CDs containing the listed items.

Neither book requires much technical knowledge. If you knew nothing about music you could probably read through either (set of) book(s) and obtain a decent understanding of music history.
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Old 09-26-2012, 07:36 AM   #27
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Any of you guys checked out Professional Orchestration by Peter Lawrence Alexander?
Pretty good in my opinion.

Here is a picture of the cover...
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Old 09-26-2012, 11:28 AM   #28
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bach didn't have an emmy
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Old 09-27-2012, 03:27 AM   #29
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Quote:
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bach didn't have an emmy

He threw a TV out of a window once though... thats pretty rock and roll...pretty "emmy".... isn't it?

We are talking Sebastian Bach, right?
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It's the same as all other harmony. Surround yourself with skulls and candles if it helps.
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Old 09-27-2012, 07:45 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by 91RG350
He threw a TV out of a window once though... thats pretty rock and roll...pretty "emmy".... isn't it?

We are talking Sebastian Bach, right?


Yeah, but it won't surprise you to learn that Johann Christian Bach was even worse than his father. A drunk, a womaniser and a low-life. Legend has it he died in the back of a horse-drawn carriage clutching a bottle of whisky and a half-written symphony.
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oh shut up with that /mu/ bullshit. fidget house shouldn't even be a genre, why in the world would it deserve its own subgenres you twat
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Old 09-28-2012, 03:42 AM   #31
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Yeah, but it won't surprise you to learn that Johann Christian Bach was even worse than his father. A drunk, a womaniser and a low-life. Legend has it he died in the back of a horse-drawn carriage clutching a bottle of whisky and a half-written symphony.


Now THATS rock and roll!
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Old 09-28-2012, 04:47 AM   #32
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I have the Berlioz book and I literally NEVER use it because the information is largely irrelevant instrumentation-wise and the concepts of extended techniques and that sort of thing are simply non-existent.


It's OT, but "The Memoirs of Hector Berlioz" is a great read.
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oh shut up with that /mu/ bullshit. fidget house shouldn't even be a genre, why in the world would it deserve its own subgenres you twat
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Old 09-28-2012, 04:48 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by 91RG350
Now THATS rock and roll!


Hank Williams actually.
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oh shut up with that /mu/ bullshit. fidget house shouldn't even be a genre, why in the world would it deserve its own subgenres you twat
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Old 01-15-2013, 10:42 PM   #34
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the ...For Dummies and Idiots Guides series have been serving me well, along with the Hal Leanord books on notation and theory for guitar
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Old 01-16-2013, 03:47 AM   #35
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This guy's books are NUTS!

A really deep study, if you're into that sort of thing.

http://www.amazon.com/Masaya-Yamagu...t_athr_dp_pel_1
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Old 10-15-2013, 02:38 AM   #37
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Hi, Hope everyone fine and thanks for the information you provide here.

Locksmith Reading PA
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Old 10-15-2013, 03:00 AM   #38
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I know you already have it on the list



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Old 12-23-2013, 08:06 AM   #39
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Kent Kennan's Counterpoint is a really good book on 18th century counterpoint. Covers similar ground to the Piston book in terms of melodic shape and melodic and harmonic rhythm, then moving on to two part writing etc, but it encourages idiomatic writing of inventions and fugues beyond simple exercises. Lots of examples given from across the repertoire although Bach is probably the best represented composer.
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