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Old 08-24-2012, 01:58 PM   #21
Nietsche
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Quote:
Originally Posted by griffRG7321
All notes fit in all the keys.


This.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Withorwithout
What does "TS" and "OP" mean by the way, i see them all over the place. And maybe some more i dont remember.


'Thread Starter' and 'Original Post'/'Original Poster' (Depends on the context). They're pretty common acronyms on webforums.
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Old 08-24-2012, 02:05 PM   #22
Captaincranky
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Withorwithout
What does "TS" and "OP" mean by the way, i see them all over the place. And maybe some more i dont remember.


"TS", means "Thread Starter".

"OP", means, "Original Post". (The original topic or question, as it were).

A Major or Minor key always have scales associated with them. Depending on the letter you start on, these scales will have sharps or flats, because the scales have tonal structual patterns they must follow. These are written in 1/2 tone, (sometimes called "semi tones") patterns. A piano shows us this in great detail, as there are black and white keys that display the full 12 tones of the chromatic scale.

If you want to learn what scale corresponds with which key at the basic level, you're just going to have to suck it up, and sit down and study, no exceptions.

Basic theory knowledge consists on a few basic things: the chromatic scale, forming major and minor scales from it, and learning to form the "triads", (3 note chords) from any particular scale. These form the harmonic backdrop for the melody.

In C Major, (or ANY major key), the most important "triads" happen on the 1st, 4th, & 5th degrees of the scale. In C major, these chords would be C, F, G, (all major chords). In G major, those same scale degree chords become, G, C, & D.

So, there's no shortcut, or a single internet post that's going to answer your question. It's gonna' to take some "book larnin'".
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Old 08-24-2012, 02:15 PM   #23
HotspurJr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Withorwithout
What does "TS" and "OP" mean by the way, i see them all over the place. And maybe some more i dont remember.


TS means threadstarter.

OP means original poster.

They mean the same thing - the guy who asked the original question. This board seems to prefer TS, but other ones prefer OP.
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Old 08-24-2012, 02:21 PM   #24
CarsonStevens
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andykndr
Take this song for instance - - I know he's been playing for years, and I haven't even been playing for a year, but what I don't understand is how he knew which notes to hit in order to play such a beautiful song, not to mention playing it fast and clean.

What I'm asking is, how can i learn to do the stuff that guitar soloists do, hitting a bunch of different notes, that sound good together, and doing it quickly. Will learning scales help? Any tips will be greatly appreciated!


You want to know two things.

1) How to know which notes to select for a solo/melody.

2) How to play it well (IE, "fast & clean").

I'll answer #2 first. You practice! Start slow (use a metronome) and work your way up to the speed you want to be able to play at, advancing a few bpm whenever you master the tempo you're at. You'll get there, but don't expect it to happen overnight. Don't expect it to happen in a few months, either. The riff I've been using as my target drill I've been playing for like, two years. Of course, I don't practice every day, so... practice every day.

Now, #1. Whether the dude improvised his solo or wrote it out beforehand, the process is the same; know the notes the key, how they relate, and how to use them. More specifically, learn how to write a melody. I always recommend the following two books, as they worked for me;

The Complete Idiot's Guide to Music Composition
The Complete Idiot's Guide to Solos and Improvisation

You definitely want to know the difference between structural and passing tones, and how to harmonize with the underlying chords. That's 3/4's of your hurdles right there.

Then, once you know that stuff... you write solos. Experiment. Keep what works, toss what doesn't. Simple as that. Well, maybe not so simple; I've re-written the solo to a song I'm working on at least three times over the last two years.

And, if none of this stuff makes sense just yet... it will, eventually. Just keep studying/practicing and it will all come together.

Last edited by CarsonStevens : 08-24-2012 at 02:23 PM.
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Old 08-24-2012, 07:06 PM   #25
Withorwithout
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nietsche
'Thread Starter' and 'Original Post'/'Original Poster' (Depends on the context). They're pretty common acronyms on webforums.


Thanks Nietsche! I haven't hanged out on english webforums much =).
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Old 08-25-2012, 12:04 AM   #26
spike4379
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yeah and the greatest secret kept by all guitarist which im sure il be killed for saying the key to being fast, is practicing painfully slow, find a run in a solo you like thats written down right, and practice it with a mETRONOME, i dont care what new age guru crap says about throwing it away, you cant have good groove and rhythm without locking in with a metronome and getting a great sense of time! practice the run (or one you have made) slooooowly maybe 80 bpm at quavers/ 8ths then in a weeks time of trying not to gouge your eyes out move the tempo up to 82, unless your achieving the speed you want and its very clean (do it with a clean tone too YES it does help) then move up until speed is required, i had to do this a dreamtheater called pull me under.
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Old 08-25-2012, 12:20 AM   #27
Captaincranky
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Originally Posted by spike4379
yeah and the greatest secret kept by all guitarist which im sure il be killed for saying the key to being fast, is practicing painfully slow, find a run in a solo you like thats written down right, and practice it with a mETRONOME, i dont care what new age guru crap says about throwing it away, you cant have good groove and rhythm without locking in with a metronome and getting a great sense of time! practice the run (or one you have made) slooooowly maybe 80 bpm at quavers/ 8ths then in a weeks time of trying not to gouge your eyes out move the tempo up to 82, unless your achieving the speed you want and its very clean (do it with a clean tone too YES it does help) then move up until speed is required, i had to do this a dreamtheater called pull me under.
Spike, isn't this answer intended to go into this thread: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/foru...61#post30207261 ? Because it surely has no bearing on this one. Um, 'jus sayin'.
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Old 08-25-2012, 07:49 AM   #28
spike4379
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i was adding to the above posts 2) fast & clean
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Old 09-30-2012, 01:04 PM   #29
sixsrtingsunder
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Tough crowd, but none the less, it is a way. It dont make it wrong if you dont like it. Now you have more to go on. ...And what everyone is saying here is true. In the end you learn all the notes on the fretboard so well that its subconcious. You are only caged if you want to be...in other words...just play.
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