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Old 09-07-2012, 01:25 PM   #41
Freepower
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^ the way I practised trem picking recently was just to stick on all my old Dino Cazares stuff, and slowly figure it all out by ear. I used Amazing Slow Downer so I could practice it all at appropriate speeds and I had a blast practising it all.
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Old 09-07-2012, 02:28 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geldin
In addition, learn some easier stuff. It'll boost your repertoire and give you confidence in your skills. It'll put variety in your practice regimin and expose you to various different ways of phrasing things. If you want stuff in the same vein as Becker, check out some of All That Remains' solo lines. Their lead guitarist is definitely influenced by neoclassical guitarists like Becker and Malmsteen, but he's not quite at that level (though his phrasing is none too shabby). The Human Abstract is another good band to look at, for similar reasons (though their guitarists are both excellent and aren't afraid to show it). Besides that, they're both hardcore influenced as well, so you won't be at all uncomfortable with the rhythmic ideas they use.


Alright. Thanks for the advice. I think Human Abstract and All That Remains might still be too challenging for me to pick as "easy songs" lol. But I can definitely give it a try and use it as a stepping stone towards even more challenging stuff (like Malmsteen, then Becker and Lane. I also like Vai, Guthrie Govan, Tony Macalpine, Zappa, Satch, and Bela Fleck a lot, despite the fact that Fleck plays the banjo, lol. I still count him as a guitar idol). Thanks!


Quote:
Originally Posted by astholkohtz
this made me smile: you're me like 3 years ago, lol!


Hah, small world! What'd you do since? What songs did you learn to work yourself out of the plateau? I'm learning communication breakdown by Led Zep. Well, rather, I already knew all the riffs/rhythm parts from about 1 or 2 months back. But I'm trying to tackle the solo and it's WAY harder than I thought it would be. I also learned Black Sabbath's Paranoid and War Pigs, but again, without the solos, which is my main interest. So I might take on those later when I finally get this one down.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Anon17
In short, learn songs and use them as exercises for your technique - Add on learning simpler songs by ear and you'll have a fun practice regime that'll last you for as long as you want to keep improving =)


Thanks! Sounds like really a solid routine. That's what I'll do. Hopefully once I get my right hand technique sorted out, I'll start making better progress. In the past this was what held me back the most, cause I could play live, but I would do a bit of a simple lead line and there would be all this horrible string noise, which back then I blamed on the amp, but thanks to you guys here, I saw that it was my right hand position, which didn't properly mute the lower strings. So I'll definitely get that looked at with my teacher cause although the string noise thing is getting better, it feels so iffy. Like I have to move my arm way too much in order to cover it up as I move to the higher strings and in the long run that will hold me back if I ever hope to play fast.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Freepower
^ the way I practised trem picking recently was just to stick on all my old Dino Cazares stuff, and slowly figure it all out by ear. I used Amazing Slow Downer so I could practice it all at appropriate speeds and I had a blast practising it all.


Amazing Slow Downer, huh? I'll try that out. Guitar pro is very limited. Sometimes x.25 speed isn't slow enough. Tuxguitar has a little bit more freedom, but only goes as slow as 30bpm, which for solos is a bit too fast for me still. Plus neither of those two help with ear training, so I'll definitely get Amazing Slow Downer right away.

Last edited by CryogenicHusk : 09-07-2012 at 02:33 PM.
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Old 09-08-2012, 07:09 AM   #43
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You can press F9 in guitar pro to loop the track at any speed. The way I like doing it is to loop a section (just use the loop, not the speed trainer) and then adjust the tempo instead of using the multipliers like x0.25, x0.5 etc... I use the multipliers if I'm learning something easy and need to get it down fast for whatever reason, but never for anything harder.
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Old 09-08-2012, 08:04 AM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anon17
You can press F9 in guitar pro to loop the track at any speed. The way I like doing it is to loop a section (just use the loop, not the speed trainer) and then adjust the tempo instead of using the multipliers like x0.25, x0.5 etc... I use the multipliers if I'm learning something easy and need to get it down fast for whatever reason, but never for anything harder.


Genius! Thanks for the tip. That definitely helps.
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Old 09-08-2012, 08:45 AM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anon17
Exactly this, keep going mate and you'll get there eventually =)


no, i meant i too used to play hc and got tired of it. this happened 3 years ago. now i sure can play black sabbath pretty well
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Old 09-08-2012, 09:52 AM   #46
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I know what you meant, I was agreeing with you (that the other guy was similar to me three years ago) - Maybe I should have quoted the other guy xD

Something else to add - If you've been practicing something for a while (let's say picking) and you're feeling frustrated and don't want to practice one day then don't practice! Taking a break about once every week or two is in my experience more beneficial than forcing yourself to practice every single day. Remember that your body and brain need breaks to take information in and process it.
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Old 09-08-2012, 02:59 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by astholkohtz
no, i meant i too used to play hc and got tired of it. this happened 3 years ago. now i sure can play black sabbath pretty well



I got tired of it 2 years ago. But I still can't quite play Sabbath solos. Two years ago I started learning scales and practicing with a metronome, and overstepped my boundaries and actually tried to learn steve vai and necrophagist and stuff like that. I made two really bad mistakes, though, which is why I'm starting from scratch again: I never played relaxed and I never learned proper right hand muting for string noise.

I'll take it slow. With the tools suggested (already trying what anon17 suggested and it's awesome), I see much promise. I can actually play along at MUCH slower speeds and memorize it that way. Another guitarist I want to learn solos from is Randy Rhoads. I feel I'll finally have a shot at learning that crazy train solo without feeling overwhelmed like I did in the past. One step at a time though. First it's that led zep solo, lol. Or maybe I'll try You shook me all night long (I watched people play it on youtube and it looks a bit slower and less challenging) first.

Last edited by CryogenicHusk : 09-08-2012 at 03:02 PM.
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Old 09-08-2012, 03:17 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anon17
I know what you meant, I was agreeing with you (that the other guy was similar to me three years ago) - Maybe I should have quoted the other guy xD

Something else to add - If you've been practicing something for a while (let's say picking) and you're feeling frustrated and don't want to practice one day then don't practice! Taking a break about once every week or two is in my experience more beneficial than forcing yourself to practice every single day. Remember that your body and brain need breaks to take information in and process it.


To take a break about once every week ? Impossible ! Guitar is a awesome drug, I can't :P
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Old 09-09-2012, 06:29 AM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CryogenicHusk
I got tired of it 2 years ago. But I still can't quite play Sabbath solos. Two years ago I started learning scales and practicing with a metronome, and overstepped my boundaries and actually tried to learn steve vai and necrophagist and stuff like that. I made two really bad mistakes, though, which is why I'm starting from scratch again: I never played relaxed and I never learned proper right hand muting for string noise.


for what is worth, what really helped me to get out the limits of 4 years of playing rhythm guitar, was blues.
improv blues on pentatonic scales. it makes you explore the neck without the hassle of playing something specific. this is crucial if you want to go from rhythm guitar to lead. it's uselesse to know specific solos and licks if you're not familiar with the neck.
then, the next natural step would be learning 3nps scales, and alternate pick the shit outta them, for ever. and again, explore major scales, think of some cool licks, or patterns to do on them.
you'll eventually stop seeing your guitar as a bunch of frets, and you'll see the scales, aka the notes you can actually play to stay in key.
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Old 09-09-2012, 07:18 AM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by astholkohtz
for what is worth, what really helped me to get out the limits of 4 years of playing rhythm guitar, was blues.
improv blues on pentatonic scales. it makes you explore the neck without the hassle of playing something specific. this is crucial if you want to go from rhythm guitar to lead. it's uselesse to know specific solos and licks if you're not familiar with the neck.
then, the next natural step would be learning 3nps scales, and alternate pick the shit outta them, for ever. and again, explore major scales, think of some cool licks, or patterns to do on them.
you'll eventually stop seeing your guitar as a bunch of frets, and you'll see the scales, aka the notes you can actually play to stay in key.


I've practiced those two things. If there's anything I can say I've progressed in these two years, it is that I learned the major (and minor) classical and pentatonic shapes as well as the patterns used to locate tthe root note all over the fretboard. I can improvise with those but it doesn't sound very good. Sounds like very linear playing. Like mostly running up and down scales and stuff - not very interesting. Its why I want to learn other solos. So I can learn from them and use them as inspiration.
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Old 09-09-2012, 08:33 AM   #51
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Originally Posted by Syndromed
To take a break about once every week ? Impossible ! Guitar is a awesome drug, I can't :P


Heh, if you have the motivation then by all means keep going =)

I just find it helps sometimes, especially when you feel like you're not improving - It seems to give my brain time to understand what I've been practicing. I take breaks probably once every week or two, but nearer every two weeks than one.
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Old 09-09-2012, 10:18 AM   #52
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Originally Posted by Anon17
Heh, if you have the motivation then by all means keep going =)

I just find it helps sometimes, especially when you feel like you're not improving - It seems to give my brain time to understand what I've been practicing. I take breaks probably once every week or two, but nearer every two weeks than one.


Improving or not, sloppy or not, good or bad ... I always practice/play ... don't know why ... :P


But, of course, you're 100 % right, good advice like used Anon!
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Old 09-09-2012, 11:10 AM   #53
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To be fair, with an attitude like that I think you're likely to become very good one day. The motivation to play is such a crucial aspect of guitar that people tend to overlook.
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Old 09-09-2012, 11:13 AM   #54
Freepower
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I haven't been able to play at all for like 3 days, I've almost got the shakes.

I go through intense periods of practice and then pretty chilled out ones. The other thing is that I have a guitar in my hands all of work as well.
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Old 09-09-2012, 12:18 PM   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anon17
To be fair, with an attitude like that I think you're likely to become very good one day. The motivation to play is such a crucial aspect of guitar that people tend to overlook.


Thanks.

I hope ... hope and practice and never never give up :P



Freepower, you're so lucky!
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Old 09-10-2012, 06:25 PM   #56
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I have a question regarding Speed and having a Relaxed Hand after a Bend.

For e.g. The first 2 bars of La Grange, 1st Solo.

The first bar is a Bend with Vibrato, the second bar is an awkward (for me) triplet run at 160bpm. I can play tripplets at 160, but not this bar, especially after the bend.

I am finding after the bend, my fretting hand is sort of locked in a claw shape, I find it hard to bend with a relaxed hand.. (can it be done?).

With my hand this tense, I am having trouble playing the following bar of tripplets cleanly at 70% speed. I can play it at clean 85% if I don't do the bend first.

Anyone had a problem with and overcome this sort of thing?
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Old 09-10-2012, 07:32 PM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wiggedy
I have a question regarding Speed and having a Relaxed Hand after a Bend.

For e.g. The first 2 bars of La Grange, 1st Solo.

The first bar is a Bend with Vibrato, the second bar is an awkward (for me) triplet run at 160bpm. I can play tripplets at 160, but not this bar, especially after the bend.

I am finding after the bend, my fretting hand is sort of locked in a claw shape, I find it hard to bend with a relaxed hand.. (can it be done?).

With my hand this tense, I am having trouble playing the following bar of tripplets cleanly at 70% speed. I can play it at clean 85% if I don't do the bend first.

Anyone had a problem with and overcome this sort of thing?


Bending/wide vibrato are quite intense and the most physically demanding techniques for guitar; while it's obviously your target to minimise tension, with bends (especially on heavy strings/acoustics) you need to develop the muscles to do it. After a while it will feel virtually effortless and you'll feel completely relaxed. That being said, if your fingers are cramping up it's possible you're not bending right. For bending upwards you should have your thumb over the neck and you should always have the side of your index finger locked to the underside of the neck when bending in order to form a pivot. You also need to ensure that the bending motion comes exclusively from the turning of your wrist and not from your fingers. It feels awkward at first but after a while it'll start to feel natural. Just don't overdo it.
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Old 09-10-2012, 07:36 PM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wiggedy
I have a question regarding Speed and having a Relaxed Hand after a Bend.

For e.g. The first 2 bars of La Grange, 1st Solo.

The first bar is a Bend with Vibrato, the second bar is an awkward (for me) triplet run at 160bpm. I can play tripplets at 160, but not this bar, especially after the bend.

I am finding after the bend, my fretting hand is sort of locked in a claw shape, I find it hard to bend with a relaxed hand.. (can it be done?).

With my hand this tense, I am having trouble playing the following bar of tripplets cleanly at 70% speed. I can play it at clean 85% if I don't do the bend first.

Anyone had a problem with and overcome this sort of thing?


Are you changing your hand position on the neck without realising it? Generally speaking you'll want your thumb on the back of the neck for the triplet run which is hopefully how you're practicing it already. For the bend you'll have your thumb on the top of the neck which makes me think you might not be going back into correct posture after the bend.

If you're tensing up, spend some time playing incredibly slowly and getting used to doing the motions relaxed. It is honestly probably the single most useful tool for removing physical blocks.
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Old 09-10-2012, 08:00 PM   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anon17
Are you changing your hand position on the neck without realising it? Generally speaking you'll want your thumb on the back of the neck for the triplet run which is hopefully how you're practicing it already. For the bend you'll have your thumb on the top of the neck which makes me think you might not be going back into correct posture after the bend.

If you're tensing up, spend some time playing incredibly slowly and getting used to doing the motions relaxed. It is honestly probably the single most useful tool for removing physical blocks.


Thanks, that is exactly what I have been doing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by llBlackenedll
Bending/wide vibrato are quite intense and the most physically demanding techniques for guitar; while it's obviously your target to minimise tension, with bends (especially on heavy strings/acoustics) you need to develop the muscles to do it. After a while it will feel virtually effortless and you'll feel completely relaxed. That being said, if your fingers are cramping up it's possible you're not bending right. For bending upwards you should have your thumb over the neck and you should always have the side of your index finger locked to the underside of the neck when bending in order to form a pivot. You also need to ensure that the bending motion comes exclusively from the turning of your wrist and not from your fingers. It feels awkward at first but after a while it'll start to feel natural. Just don't overdo it.


It's possible I haven't been turning my wrist while bending, thanks for the advice. It's so easy to over look these things.
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Old 09-20-2012, 05:33 AM   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by llBlackenedll
The other day, I came across this video of Shawn Lane where he said (unlike what you'd expect) that he started off very fast and just cleaned it up; in fact he recommended other people do that.


I gotta say I am shattered, after watching the Shawn Lane video a couple of weeks ago. I have been watching and listening to a lot of his stuff on youtube, Fantastic!!

Then today, I had a thought. "I wonder what Shawn Lane is doing these days"

Damn!!!

Like I said I am shattered, he might as well have died today. I feel like a whole species has become extinct.

That Man was a genius.

Then I found this at 01:30 he is
16 yrs old playing with Black Oak Arkansas.

I would love to know how long it took him to learn a piece. Like did he have photographic recall in his fingers.

Last edited by wiggedy : 09-20-2012 at 05:35 AM.
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