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Old 01-12-2012, 02:55 AM   #1
renk
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Tone, Vocal Range and Style

Hi guys I have a problem that has been bugging me for a while now. I'm a lead guitarist and a couple of years ago I started back singing to help me construct the music around some of lyrics I've written. Originally my hopes were simply to be a singer/guitarist in the stylings of Jimi Hendrix at best and that worked out decently for a while until I started looking around for some technique lessons. On my way there I found SS and over the next two or so yrs of using it of and on my usable vocal range has increased exponentially while my vocal "taste" was pretty much horrible for a while meaning there wasn't a word I wouldn't try to belt.

My problem is as it stands now my voice isn't suitable for the genres of rock I've loved playing as a guitarist and I don't know what to do with my voice as far as it concerns the music I have written and song choices

So my question to you guys is would it be better to seek out a teacher to help in shaping and finding a style that best suites my rediscovered voice or try out covers of other musicians that sing in my range ? This is moreso a mental hurdle that I'm trying to overcome
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Old 01-13-2012, 12:41 AM   #2
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Your voice is what it is, for the most part. If you have a Telecaster, you ain't playing in a Pantera tribute band.

That said, there are many different types of voices in rock. You HAVE to find something that works for your voice, though. Steven Tyler will never sound like Lemme, and James Hetfield will never sound like Bruce Dickenson.

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Old 01-24-2012, 03:30 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by axemanchris
Your voice is what it is, for the most part. If you have a Telecaster, you ain't playing in a Pantera tribute band.

That said, there are many different types of voices in rock. You HAVE to find something that works for your voice, though. Steven Tyler will never sound like Lemme, and James Hetfield will never sound like Bruce Dickenson.

CT


This. And I'm sure there is some rock out there to fit your new vocal style. But it sounds like your voice has improved and trying to take it back to where you were seems like a step in the wrong direction to me.
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Old 01-27-2012, 11:28 PM   #4
davem27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by renk
Hi guys I have a problem that has been bugging me for a while now. I'm a lead guitarist and a couple of years ago I started back singing to help me construct the music around some of lyrics I've written. Originally my hopes were simply to be a singer/guitarist in the stylings of Jimi Hendrix at best and that worked out decently for a while until I started looking around for some technique lessons. On my way there I found SS and over the next two or so yrs of using it of and on my usable vocal range has increased exponentially while my vocal "taste" was pretty much horrible for a while meaning there wasn't a word I wouldn't try to belt.

My problem is as it stands now my voice isn't suitable for the genres of rock I've loved playing as a guitarist and I don't know what to do with my voice as far as it concerns the music I have written and song choices

So my question to you guys is would it be better to seek out a teacher to help in shaping and finding a style that best suites my rediscovered voice or try out covers of other musicians that sing in my range ? This is moreso a mental hurdle that I'm trying to overcome

i kinda get what you mean, and sorry i cant be of any help, but i'll give you a free bump with the question, whats SS?
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Old 03-01-2012, 09:13 AM   #5
renk
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Sorry it took so long to respond SS= Singing Success. What I've come to realize is that, I need to stick with doing covers and do it in my own style or way. I was getting too obsessed with trying to sound like the person i was covering, because I could sing in the key they can sing in and it was ruining my confidence. I was also trying to rush things along the shortest path possible and now I know it's not possible. More than likely though I have to get a good vocal coach as soon as I could afford one

Here are some samples of the foundation I'm trying to create

http://hu.lk/zu0ajt6lpm61
http://hu.lk/3v92osxyvq6j
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Old 03-01-2012, 04:36 PM   #6
KrisHQ
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I think pretty much every singer thinks that way.
I have, without sounding too self-satisfied, a pretty decent vocal range.
But i hate my tone, and to me it doesn't suit anything.
Im mostly into progressive rock, and i cant distort my voice at all. Not even a little bit.

My point is.
Make the music you like, regardless of how you sound and what genre you THINK you suite. If your music is good, it doesn't really matter.

To me, James Labrie does not have the best tone, but Dream Theater still made it.
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Old 03-01-2012, 07:09 PM   #7
CGB89
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Check out anything Myles Kennedy has done. You're bound to find something. His voice is soo versatile. If you're taking lessons, you're learning correct technique. And correct technique is the first step to being able to sing ANY type of music. You can use inflections, air pressure, compression, vowel placement, and other stylings to make your voice fit a genre.

Chest belting, compression, and grit are great rock stylings. But, be absolutely 100% sure you're using the correct technique. You don't want to hurt yourself. I personally would recommend Jaime Vendera's books and lessons over the SS system. But, for me, I learn through mimicry. Maybe try that? Mimic your favorite singers until you find a technique that works.

Hope I could help!
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Old 03-03-2012, 02:10 PM   #8
renk
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Yeah I like listening to Myles Kennedy and especially Chris Cornell alot .I also love a lot of female singers and female fronted band and have been told I sing like a girl most likely because of that. You see one the major things I love about rock and that got me into it is that grit guys like David Grohl can get. Well because of that I've been staying away from rock a bit so I don't damage my voice trying to force things.

Where I think the conflict or disconnect is that I stopped singing outwardly and gave up on singing for a very long time. So even before I seriously started writing songs, I would always imagine what these verses, lines, chorus would sound like. So then when I started attempting to write guitar parts, and then later complete instrumentals to these words I kind of got stuck in this ideal of how it would sound.

For me it felt like working your but off at a dead end job, the best you hope for is a promotion or two but nothing major, then all in a sudden you win a 100 million in the lotto. All that money doesn't all in sudden buy you good taste, style or class. And that's something I'm still learning about not trying to rush things too much

Honestly, I think right now I've gotta put things in better hands, find me a good vocal coach and just give myself time to accept and get accustomed to how my voice is now.
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Old 09-12-2012, 12:17 PM   #9
renk
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I posted some acapella covers today if anyone want to take a listen here they are
http://hu.lk/ucbc26a2iups
http://hu.lk/r1y3zsp7tvy8
http://hu.lk/47zfq27qnyio
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Old 09-13-2012, 08:15 AM   #10
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This is what rock sounds like because some people chose to sing it like this. Noone wanted to sing like Hetfield before Hetfield came up etc. So just use whatever you got.

For example listen to Akerfeldt. His clean voice doesn't sound "metal" at all. But Opeth are one of the best metal bands ever.

Okay I listened to these clips...Your voice sounds weird not girly. Are you trying to copy some rnb artist or something? It sounds like your trying to go really high, with no support, your voice shaking like hell and your closing your nose at the same time. This is falsetto voice when you're untrained I guess. I don't know the original song but rock usually needs mix voice. It sounds stronger.

Also stop going really high if it's not necessary. You might be straining your voice. Work on your lower notes. If you can really sing with power in the range C4-C5 I think you're set. That's where most of the high singing in rock happens. Plus there's no high note everyone should reach in order to sound high enough. A strong C5 from a baritone will sound as powerful as a F5 from a tenor.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CGB89
I personally would recommend Jaime Vendera's books and lessons over the SS system.


I agree. SS is good but it's better for other styles of singing.

Last edited by Sethis : 09-13-2012 at 08:34 AM.
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Old 09-13-2012, 10:53 AM   #11
renk
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Yeah the last clips as an RnB song . My nose actually is closed but it's not something I am trying to do, I simply just can't breathe through my nose. It's something I'm trying to work around. The singing is supposed to be head voice or high mix. The shakyness is bad vibrato.

It's actually easier for me to sing that high, while on most days my mid mix is hit or miss because I don't have proper breathing support. I'll look into the Jaime Vendera books and stuff
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Old 09-13-2012, 01:25 PM   #12
Sethis
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Using the nasal area as a resonator for your voice isn't bad if it's done by choice. Your just doing it the wrong way I guess. You will know when your not using it because then even if you close your nose with your fingers while singing your tone won't change.
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