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Old 10-11-2012, 04:52 AM   #21
element256
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Quote:
Originally Posted by purplexing
Technique is subjective. In my opinion metal technique is 'linear'. Fast shredding leads and fast rhythms. It's limited to only that. If I worked my ass of with a metronome and scales, I can say that it would be understandable how to get to Abasi's level. On the other hand I can't even grasp how I could ever get the chops to not only play something like this, but to compose something like this.

0:00 - 1:00

[youtube vid]


Well if you find a basic blues scale unable to grasp I've got good news for you. Here's his entire song because it's just a standard blues scale:
http://12bar.de/soloscal.php
Playing slap on an acoustic guitar doesn't make it spectacular in any way BUT Tobin can do that better as well as incorperating different scales from blues to classical & time signature changes:


How about contemplating how to write a song like that?


Guthrie Govan is a perfect example of what I would call evoking emotion in your music as opposed to the technical prowess and level of someone like Tobin. I'd put Guthrie into the Satriani level, standard timing for the most part, no BPM changes etc.. He definitely evokes emotion and I actually like his style of playing as a "guitar virtuoso" alot, but he's someone that goes on the G3 tour and wouldn't be able to write in the same vein as Tobin. I'd say there's a gazillion Flamenco guitarists that are amazing as well, but still not even on the same planet as the 2 people I mentioned and if you're going to just pigeon hole them into only their recordings with a particular band then it's not even a discussion anymore because you haven't taken the time to look past the band aspect and see their true musicality.

Hair metal is about shredding. That's come and gone from the 80s-90s and there's so few of those speed metal musicians that still survive because they can't adapt to the new level of playing. Fear Factory & Meshuggah brought about a new way to play in the genre and metalheads are SO PICKY about their particular style of metal and who's a better this and that, that the genre only progresses in the underground bands like Animals as Leaders, The Human Abstract, Between the Buried and Me, Born of Osiris. These are bands and musicians that are pushing the boundries of what metal even is nowadays and broadening the spectrum with heavy classical and jazz influences. These are really young kids with the highest natural talents and an extremely advanced knowledge of musical theory in various aspects.

I don't even like or listen to half their stuff because it's just not pleasent to me. I like hooks, I like emotion, I like structure. But then there's pieces in each band like THA's Midheaven album that's very abstract and an out of body outlook on humanity, stuff that pulls you in as a listener.

I would never disrespect another musician but you obviously have to realize there's always a talent level that some people just can't reach and Abasi is a 1 percenter in that regard, very very few on that level of expertise in both playing and more importantly writing.

For the OP, he said he was stuck in a rut and not progressing. I offered some fun and lightly technical music that in my opinion, without knowing his current skill level would help him out and open doors to a new style and\or function for his guitar.
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Old 10-11-2012, 05:09 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by element256
Guthrie Govan is a perfect example of what I would call evoking emotion in your music as opposed to the technical prowess and level of someone like Tobin


1 - It's Tosin. Tobin is the guy who played Jigsaw in the saw movies

2 - If that's what you think... you don't know enough about Guthrie. Seriously.
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Old 10-11-2012, 05:14 AM   #23
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Please be on topic, thank you
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Old 10-11-2012, 05:21 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by dragonballdbz
Please be on topic, thank you


The most important thing you can do is just learn the songs you want to hear. That will get you to exactly the technical level you need to be at to do what you want. If you have trouble then identify what the issue is and find or make an exercise to work on the problem.

"I am not progressing" isn't really enough information on its own, we need to know why you're not progressing to help.

That said, you said in your first post that you only practice 3 times a week for an hour... you can make progress in that kind of time but if you really want to accelerate it and see results you should be putting in more time than that.
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Old 10-11-2012, 06:49 AM   #25
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Well, as everyone else has said 3 hours a week will not be very fast progress - especially seeing as you're including "songs from tab" as part of your "practice".

If you really want to progress, take one aspect of your playing (I'd suggest working things out by ear!) and spend at least 40 mins on it every day for 3 months. Then you'll see results.

And as for who has the best chops - it's about musicians, not genres. Whoever is the most dedicated will have the best technique, regardless of genre.
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Old 10-11-2012, 06:54 AM   #26
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I would suggest, rather than practicing 1 hour for three times a week, practice for 25min everyday. Consistency is everything. Dont leave a day without practice, even if its for a 10 minute. I find this very important.
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Old 10-11-2012, 12:46 PM   #27
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Well I'll chime in because I've related to the OP so much. Just practicing a ton and yet not being able to nail what you're trying to learn. Like for example, practicing a riff all the way from 25% to 80% speed and getting stuck at that 80 for weeks and giving up/moving to something else.

I'd just like to say that it's weird sometimes with guitar playing. I haven't been playing much at all the past few weeks and I have been tabbing. I'm doing an extremely difficult tab IMO, for example it took a couple of hours to figure out just a few bars of guitar work (I finally figured out there were 4 guitar tracks... at 4/4 180bpm with about 10 additional instruments)

Just now I fired up a song that was at the peak of my skill level in rhythm guitar and quite hard for me (It's "Throes of Perdition" by Trivium if anyone would know) and somehow for some reason today play it with ease even I haven't practiced. Like it's going automatic, I can even sing along in some parts.

What I mean is you can take a break and do something else or play a different style than you're trying to learn. You sometimes can't force a technique on to yourself, give it time and let your fingers and hands adapt. I know I've practiced the same thing over and over for weeks and not improving. But you are improving, results just don't always show at once.

Last edited by fanapathy : 10-11-2012 at 12:48 PM.
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Old 10-11-2012, 02:52 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by fanapathy
Just now I fired up a song that was at the peak of my skill level in rhythm guitar and quite hard for me (It's "Throes of Perdition" by Trivium if anyone would know) and somehow for some reason today play it with ease even I haven't practiced. Like it's going automatic, I can even sing along in some parts.

What I mean is you can take a break and do something else or play a different style than you're trying to learn. You sometimes can't force a technique on to yourself, give it time and let your fingers and hands adapt. I know I've practiced the same thing over and over for weeks and not improving. But you are improving, results just don't always show at once.


This is the most encouraging thing I have read in a long time.
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Old 10-11-2012, 03:15 PM   #29
element256
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fanapathy
Just now I fired up a song that was at the peak of my skill level in rhythm guitar and quite hard for me (It's "Throes of Perdition" by Trivium if anyone would know) and somehow for some reason today play it with ease even I haven't practiced. Like it's going automatic, I can even sing along in some parts.


I love that Trivium riff! Grats on accomplishing it!

Try this one out too it's one of my favorite riffs to play at the moment. It gets you flowing and forgetting about what you're even playing and just puts you into a great fun inspired musical zone:

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