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Old 10-13-2012, 11:13 AM   #1
asder99
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Backing track blues

Hi!
I usually play on youtube's backing track blues for improving my pentatonic scale, but I'd like to make my own one.

I just know the basic chords for the backing track in G: A7-A7-D7-A7-E7-A7.

Where can I find some other chords for other notes?

And, last question, I'd like to find some easy fingerpicking backing track... anyone can help me?


Thanks a lot!
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Old 10-13-2012, 11:32 AM   #2
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Buddy, I thought the most basic 12-bar blues was I, IV, I, V, IV, I.
Why are you going in the key of G: V7/IV, V7, V7/ii, V7/IV? You can have dominant 7ths but I think there is something you aren't clear on. Do some reading and sort this out first would you?

Last edited by GoldenGuitar : 10-13-2012 at 12:38 PM.
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Old 10-13-2012, 12:32 PM   #3
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Ehm... I must admit I'm not well trained on music theory.
Could you be more clear?
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Old 10-13-2012, 12:41 PM   #4
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I think you should read up on the basic blues forms before trying to construct your backing track. That's as clear as I can get.
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Old 10-13-2012, 01:18 PM   #5
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Could you link me something about, please?

Thank you!
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Old 10-13-2012, 04:33 PM   #6
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Basic chords for backing track in G are definitely not "A7-A7-D7-A7-E7-A7." Those chords are in A. But if you want blues in G, the most basic progression is G7x4, C7x2, G7x2, D7, C7, G7, D7. You should learn how the chords function inside a key, that's very important to know so you know how to transpose chords. When you have learned how chords function in a key, you'll understand what it means when people say I-I-I-I-IV-IV-I-I-V-IV-I-V (that's 12 bar blues in all keys). The "I" chord in this case is G, "IV" chord is C and "V" chord is D.
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Old 10-14-2012, 04:49 AM   #7
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Thanks!
But I've got one more question: I understand the "I-I-I-I-IV-IV-I-I-V-IV-I-V", but how do you assume that the IV chord is C and the V is D (in case of G)?

How does it work?

Thanks again!
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Old 10-14-2012, 08:36 AM   #8
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they are scale degrees l=1 v=5 lv=4

in the key of G 1 is G, 4 is C, 5 is D.
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Old 10-14-2012, 10:34 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asder99
Thanks!
I understand the "I-I-I-I-IV-IV-I-I-V-IV-I-V",

So why do you need to ask this...

Quote:
but how do you assume that the IV chord is C and the V is D (in case of G)?

How does it work?

This isn't something you can pick up and read about, and then have it down in a day.

You need to start from the very beginning.
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Old 10-14-2012, 12:49 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by metalmetalhead
they are scale degrees l=1 v=5 lv=4

in the key of G 1 is G, 4 is C, 5 is D.


Yes, I know roman's number. :P
I just asking how G=1, C=4 and D=5... how about calculation?

Thanks!
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Old 10-14-2012, 12:52 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mdc
So why do you need to ask this...


This isn't something you can pick up and read about, and then have it down in a day.

You need to start from the very beginning.


I don't need to write an album, I just want to know how to get the right chord sequence for make a simple blues backing track...
It doesn't seem hard... :P
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Old 10-14-2012, 12:52 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asder99
Thanks!
But I've got one more question: I understand the "I-I-I-I-IV-IV-I-I-V-IV-I-V", but how do you assume that the IV chord is C and the V is D (in case of G)?

How does it work?

Thanks again!

Think them as intervals from the key center (I chord, G in this case). If you don't know the intervals, it's about time learning them. Here's G major scale: G A B C D E F#. G is the first note so G major chord is the I chord. C is the fourth note of the scale so C major is the IV chord. D is the fifth note so D major is the V chord. This can be applied to any key and that's why it's important to learn.

It's also good to know, which chords in which key are majors and minors. You can always borrow chords from other keys but let's stay inside one key because it's easier.

First chord we get is G B D. That's G major.

Second chord A C E, A minor.

Third chord B D F#, B minor.

Fourth chord C E G, C major.

Fifth chord D F# A, D major.

Sixth chord E G B, E minor.

Seventh chord F# A C, F# diminished.

This applies to any major key. The I, IV and V chords are always major, ii, iii and vi chords are always minor and vii chord is always diminished. Though in rock music it's very common to use bVII chord (F major in this case) which is a major chord, borrowed from the parallel minor (G minor). And diminished chords in rock are not that common.
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Old 10-14-2012, 02:48 PM   #13
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Magg, the bVII is normally used in minor key songs.

But the "calculation" for finding which chords go with the roman numeral in which key is just the scale degree, as someone already stated.

If you're in G Major, the scale degrees go as:
1 G
2 A
3 B
4 C
5 D
6 E
7 F#
1 G
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Old 10-14-2012, 05:09 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King Of Suede
Magg, the bVII is normally used in minor key songs.

But the "calculation" for finding which chords go with the roman numeral in which key is just the scale degree, as someone already stated.

If you're in G Major, the scale degrees go as:
1 G
2 A
3 B
4 C
5 D
6 E
7 F#
1 G

Then it's not bVII any more because it's the natural VII (minor key naturally has a minor seventh but it's sometimes a major seventh because of harmonic minor). For example D major in E minor song. That's not borrowed from anywhere. But many major rock songs use bVII chord borrowed from the relative minor. (Almost anything AC/DC. Highway to Hell is a good example. Main riff uses chords A, D/F# and G and in this case G is the bVII chord.)
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Old 10-15-2012, 09:46 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggaraMarine
Think them as intervals from the key center (I chord, G in this case). If you don't know the intervals, it's about time learning them. Here's G major scale: G A B C D E F#. G is the first note so G major chord is the I chord. C is the fourth note of the scale so C major is the IV chord. D is the fifth note so D major is the V chord. This can be applied to any key and that's why it's important to learn.

It's also good to know, which chords in which key are majors and minors. You can always borrow chords from other keys but let's stay inside one key because it's easier.


Thanks a lot, really! You gave me a very clean explanation.
Anyway I already know what you're talking about, it's harmonization of major scale (I
hope it's the correct english name, 'cause I'm italian, and I just translate it litterally).
I have to find my old music school notes.

So I've understand that I, IV and V are the first, the fourth and the fifth chord of the major scale of the chord I want to play.

Thank you again for the patience!

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggaraMarine


First chord we get is G B D. That's G major.

Second chord A C E, A minor.

Third chord B D F#, B minor.

Fourth chord C E G, C major.

Fifth chord D F# A, D major.

Sixth chord E G B, E minor.

Seventh chord F# A C, F# diminished.

This applies to any major key. The I, IV and V chords are always major, ii, iii and vi chords are always minor and vii chord is always diminished. Though in rock music it's very common to use bVII chord (F major in this case) which is a major chord, borrowed from the parallel minor (G minor). And diminished chords in rock are not that common.


Dude, with your few words you did better than my music teacher in a 2 hours lesson. Congrats!
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Old 10-15-2012, 09:51 AM   #16
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I'll write down an example, correct me if I'm wrong:
A backing track for a blues in A maj:
A - A - A - A - D - D - A - A - E - D - A - E

Is it right?
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Old 10-15-2012, 09:56 AM   #17
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That would work as a blues progression, yes.
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Old 10-15-2012, 10:00 AM   #18
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I'm glad you've learnt something asder!
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Old 10-15-2012, 10:10 AM   #19
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Yes yes, to the above^^

So many threads come in and out of this forum where people pose questions and people give answers and either the TS doesn't read the posts or they just don't want to let a new idea in.
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Old 10-18-2012, 01:44 PM   #20
asder99
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Thanks a lot to everyone!
I'm going to play some blues now...
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