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Old 11-30-2012, 01:08 AM   #21
Jackward
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I'd throw in some Annihilator to the mix - there's plenty of pretty sick and tight rhythm patterns everywhere, check out records such as Alice in Hell or Never, Neverland.
Other bands to check out for riffs (apart from the ones mentioned by others) would be Revocation, Havok, Evile, Lazarus A.D - all pretty much related to modern thrash/death.
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Old 11-30-2012, 11:33 AM   #22
CryogenicHusk
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Thank you all for your extra suggestions. Will definitely work on some Gojira, Revocation, Annihilator, Opeth, Trivium and Lamb of God.

Can't at the moment, though... Have a progress evaluation on classical guitar (coincidentally, it's the rhythms where I am having a difficult time), and really want to nail it like I did first time around, and also been using what little time I've got left to learn some funk/r&b and some jazz standards I already learned the notes and chords for but still working on the harmony rhythm. Once I get that stuff down I'll definitely focus on these.
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Old 11-30-2012, 12:41 PM   #23
|Long|
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CryogenicHusk
Thank you all for your extra suggestions. Will definitely work on some Gojira, Revocation, Annihilator, Opeth, Trivium and Lamb of God.

Can't at the moment, though... Have a progress evaluation on classical guitar (coincidentally, it's the rhythms where I am having a difficult time), and really want to nail it like I did first time around, and also been using what little time I've got left to learn some funk/r&b and some jazz standards I already learned the notes and chords for but still working on the harmony rhythm. Once I get that stuff down I'll definitely focus on these.

Considering you troubles with the classical pieces, it may be worth stepping back from the heavy-super fast rhythms and doing to something slower, maybe less intricate. The internal metronome needs to be built up from square one.

An exercise I enjoy is playing a 12 bar blues, looping it, then soloing over it. Keep the metronome on and play to the chord changes. It is very helpful for me, as it gets you to hear and respond to the music. During the lead, oh X notes have passed so I have Y beats left before the chord changes ... better finish the phrase on time.

It's a break from just chugging chords, but it has helped me a lot.

Also, it will help with your theory as you need to think about how to play the chords, and then end the phasing properly to lead to the next chord.
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Last edited by |Long| : 11-30-2012 at 12:42 PM.
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Old 11-30-2012, 01:54 PM   #24
fanapathy
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Well have you experimented with tuning low?

If you tune to B standard, you can pretty much keep that tuning for rhythm practice and just skip a string to play in E. It will take a while for it to stay in tune but it means you can play 7 string based riffs and it can actually sound quite good with normal strings. You can play these awesome riffs off of Trivium's Shogun that is like amazing rhythm guitar practice (see "Into the mouth of hell we march")

FF's Demanufacture album is also great for rhythm practice like you noticed. I can also recommend Disturbed songs for a bit easier stuff, they're in Drop C# usually which is just half step down and then a bit more for your top string

Cheers
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Old 11-30-2012, 07:10 PM   #25
mutex77
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I personally like rhythm players like Keith Richards, Hendrix, Garcia, Page and EVH that often change things up in the background to keep it interesting, but still keep the rhythm going. Repeating riffs definitely have their place, it what gives songs like iron man their impact. But with alot of songs I like it when they switch things around slightly. I recently saw a video with Phil X playing Zeps Rock and Roll and he pointed out how one verse just has an open D string for a few lines instead of the riff the rest of the songs have. It doesnt stand out, but when you listen for it its there and adds to the song without being flashy and obvious.

The other day I noticed the rhythm guitar to the stones beast of burden. Instead of just playing the riff Richards and Wood have this intertwining improv thing going. Ive heard that song a thousand times and I never really noticed it, i dont really like the song much...but i'd like it alot less if it was just the same riff played over and over again.

Someone mentioned funk...I learned alot from watching funk guitar videos. There was alot about syncing up with the groove and then adding to it without stepping on the other things going on. It showed me some huge holes in my timing as well that im now working on.
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