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Old 10-24-2012, 10:09 PM   #1
lobstermobster
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Different scales to use while improvising

Hi all,
So I have been playing guitar for a few years and I feel like I have a real firm grasp on improvising with your bog-standard pentatonic scales.
My question is this: are than there any other scales I can use to add more color to my solos? Or is it possible to solo in a different key alltogether?
I primarily do blues improv btw.

And a note to all moderators: I apologize in advance if I posted this in the wrong place. Im a newb.
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Old 10-24-2012, 10:19 PM   #2
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Do you know major and the different minors? If not, learn them. Then learn whole-half, Spanish 8 tone, and Egyptian scales.
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Old 10-25-2012, 12:33 AM   #3
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assuming you also know your major/minor and not just pentatonics, add more color = learn to do more with the ones you currently know (phrasing and so forth)

also ignore the post above this one, jesus
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Old 10-25-2012, 01:02 AM   #4
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Ok, thanks guys. I know my major and minors. I guess I'll start using them.
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Old 10-25-2012, 01:09 AM   #5
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please don't thank him, send all your thanks to me

his contribution was poopy
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Old 10-25-2012, 01:59 AM   #6
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please don't thank him, send all your thanks to me

his contribution was poopy


you're getting really good at this
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Old 10-25-2012, 02:12 AM   #7
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To get used to the extra major/minor notes, use your pentatonics and then add the extras as brief fillers or transition notes... thats one way of doing it anyway... without unlearning everything you have learned...
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Old 10-25-2012, 09:17 AM   #8
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Chromatic scale. It has everything you will ever need.
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Old 10-25-2012, 09:34 AM   #9
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A scale is nothing more than a triad or tonality surround by melodic notes that support the extended harmony of the triad/tonality.

Many times notes that aren't in the scale support the movement of tonality stronger than notes in the scale.

Learn how to lean on chord tones, move to chord tones, and rest on chord tones. Regardless of any other note at the time, these are your money notes, and you need to know how to get to them and away from them.

The Minor Pentatonic scale is nothing more than a Minor triad with a b7 and a 4. These notes help you get to and from the Root and m3 (in this case I'm talk about the 4), and to and from the 5 and Root (in this case I'm talking about the b7).

The Minor Pentatonic scale can also be thought of as a m7 arpeggio with only a 4 added. In this case, a Minor Pentatonic scale is a a portion of a m11 chord, or deadringer scale for a m11 chord.
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Old 10-25-2012, 10:16 AM   #10
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Modes and scales are dumb and useless. Stop learning them. No, seriously.






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Old 10-27-2012, 05:48 AM   #11
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Try learning the harmonic minor scale, sounds cool
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Old 10-27-2012, 07:21 AM   #12
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Lydian dominant as well. Kinda useful for non resolving domiants. Basically, if you find that the perfect 4th clashes with the overall key centre, then just raise it.

Yeah, whatever....

Last edited by mdc : 10-27-2012 at 07:23 AM.
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Old 11-01-2012, 12:02 PM   #13
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you can use another scale when the rythm parts have the certain notes of the scale. for example there are a lot of really chromatic metal backing tracks on youtube where one preson is improvising in e minor the other in e phrygian major (look at the response videos to the 'masters of metal' backing track). or in more detail if a chord progression uses a note outside the scale (i.e smoke on the water riff has a diminished 5). you can use that diminished 5 in your scale youre improvising with. improvise over the smoke on the water riff with the pentatonic scale, but add the flat 5 note in the scale as well. IN SHORT IF THE RYTHM PART HAS THE NOTE YOU CAN USE THE NOTE IN YOUR IMPROVISATION.
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Old 11-01-2012, 12:13 PM   #14
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Once you know the major and minor scales, don't think that the way to add spice to your playing is to learn more scales.

Rather, think of it as learning how to use the scales you know. That is to say, the sounds you get should be coming from your choices WITHIN the scale, not the scale itself. After all, dramatically different sounds came come out of the simple pentatonic.

But they won't, unless you know what you're doing. So develop your ear. Learn to think of a scale as a collection of notes which each have their own INDIVIDUAL relationship to the tonic, not as a collection of safe notes.

When you're soloing, are you aware of when you're playing the tonic? Are you aware of any other scale degrees - aurally, not intellectually? Are you aware of your chord tones - again, aurally, not intellectually?

If not, work on that stuff. Don't learn more scales.
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Old 11-01-2012, 01:21 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hamza hashmi
you can use another scale when the rythm parts have the certain notes of the scale. for example there are a lot of really chromatic metal backing tracks on youtube where one preson is improvising in e minor the other in e phrygian major (look at the response videos to the 'masters of metal' backing track). or in more detail if a chord progression uses a note outside the scale (i.e smoke on the water riff has a diminished 5). you can use that diminished 5 in your scale youre improvising with. improvise over the smoke on the water riff with the pentatonic scale, but add the flat 5 note in the scale as well. IN SHORT IF THE RYTHM PART HAS THE NOTE YOU CAN USE THE NOTE IN YOUR IMPROVISATION.

And if the rhythm part doesn't have the note you can also use it in your improvisation.

Theory is DEScriptive, not PREscriptive...it just tells you what you've done, not what TO do.
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Old 11-01-2012, 01:35 PM   #16
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Another trick you can use with your bog standard pents is to solo from the fifth
so if in the key of Gm try a D minor pent then move another fifth A minor pent.
only really works with minor keys though.

you may have already tried this.
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