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Old 11-07-2012, 04:45 AM   #1
Androidjoey
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I have a few questions on setting up a home studio gear wise.

So I have decided to make a home studio because paying $200 to record one song at the local studios is a complete waste of money in the long run seeing as we will be recording around 10 So my question is what all would I need gear wise to set up a home studio O and we would like to mic our amps instead of plugging into an interface

Last edited by Androidjoey : 11-07-2012 at 04:46 AM.
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Old 11-07-2012, 04:49 AM   #2
GaryBillington
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Actually, if you're looking to use your recording for any kind of demo, whether it's to sell your band to potential venues or to sell the CD to fans, then paying to get it done at a professional studio is an extremely worthwhile investment.

Unless you have a lot of experience in recording, mixing & mastering your songs, attempting to do it yourself will result in poor quality and nobody will want to hear your work. Getting yourself to a point where you could produce something worthwhile would take a good couple of years practice.

Also consider that the equipment you'd require (most of which is discussed in the Interfaces sticky) would probably cost just as much as paying to use a studio.
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Old 11-07-2012, 04:56 AM   #3
Androidjoey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaryBillington
Actually, if you're looking to use your recording for any kind of demo, whether it's to sell your band to potential venues or to sell the CD to fans, then paying to get it done at a professional studio is an extremely worthwhile investment.

Unless you have a lot of experience in recording, mixing & mastering your songs, attempting to do it yourself will result in poor quality and nobody will want to hear your work. Getting yourself to a point where you could produce something worthwhile would take a good couple of years practice.

Also consider that the equipment you'd require (most of which is discussed in the Interfaces sticky) would probably cost just as much as paying to use a studio.

Well that's what I was thinking but the people around here want $150 on top of recording the songs to mix each song so i'm thinking it would be better for me to get a friend of mine who is fluent in pro tools to help produce it O and I took a peak at the interfaces sticky and found this http://tascam.com/product/2488neo/specifications/ would this be good enough for mixing and recording
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Old 11-07-2012, 06:21 AM   #4
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The Tascam 2488 is a great piece of kit - I use the MkII that preceded the Neo & get on very well with it. It's more than capable of creating professional quality recordings, but the hardest part is developing the skills needed to utilise it fully.

With a purpose built DAW like the 2488 there's a much smaller learning curve than there is for a software based system, but only for actually learning how to use the main functionality - learning to record/mix etc is like learning a whole new instrument, it takes a lot of time & practice.
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Old 11-07-2012, 04:43 PM   #5
Androidjoey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaryBillington
The Tascam 2488 is a great piece of kit - I use the MkII that preceded the Neo & get on very well with it. It's more than capable of creating professional quality recordings, but the hardest part is developing the skills needed to utilise it fully.

With a purpose built DAW like the 2488 there's a much smaller learning curve than there is for a software based system, but only for actually learning how to use the main functionality - learning to record/mix etc is like learning a whole new instrument, it takes a lot of time & practice.

Ok thanks for the info.
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Old 11-07-2012, 05:25 PM   #6
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No problem.

Of course, to create a high quality demo CD you'll also need a selection of microphones for the different instruments and some quality monitors. If you really need a professional sound you'll also need to consider the room you're recording in and probably acoustic treatment as well.

To get started though, the 2488 & the mics you already use for your band will be enough.
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Old 11-07-2012, 08:47 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Androidjoey
complete waste of money in the long run


Actually, it's kind of the opposite. Assuming that the quality of said studio is decent, you'll be paying a lot more to do it yourself. To get the equipment they probably are using, you'll probably be spending about $1,000 or more.

But the biggest thing is knowledge and experience. Anyone can throw a mic in front of an amp. I's knowing how to achieve that sound is what's so valuable, and takes years to do that. I'm not really trying to dissuade you, but you'd be much happier with the results from the studio.
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Old 11-07-2012, 09:55 PM   #8
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From your profile, it seems you're going to be recording metal. You're probably going to want to record a real drum kit then.

So... an 8-channel interface (minimum) is going to run you at least $500.
Some drum mics.... say.... kick, snare, toms, floor, overheads left and right = $600.
Vocal mic - $200
pop filter - $20
headphones for tracking - $20
Cables and stands for above - $250
Monitors - $400
Software - $60
Room treatment - $200

Total = $2250

These prices are all very conservative. You really can't spend appreciably less, but you sure can spend a whole lot more.

You know how it took you a few years to get your guitar playing ready for prime time? You don't seriously think you're going to get your recording skills ready for prime time much faster, do you?

So, yeah... option 1 = $2250 and, to be modest, you'll have your demo done in two years.

Or, option 2 = For that price, you could book a week in a project studio and pay probably considerably less than that, and have it done in a week.

My advice has always been, if you want to learn how to record, then do so. If you want a recording done inexpensively with decent gear and someone who knows how to use it, go to a project studio. If you need a great recording done with excellent gear and a real pro behind the mixer, go to a pro studio.

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Last edited by axemanchris : 11-07-2012 at 09:58 PM.
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