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Old 11-14-2012, 08:28 PM   #1
ChucklesMginty
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Limiting input in Reaper?

Recording some guitar into Reaper and noticed the input signal is way too loud, it's not audibly clipping but I can see the top of the sound wave getting cut off. I tried using the Pad input on my UX2 but it's still too loud.

I'm just recording direct and using VST plugins, which I have set to make the signal quieter. Haven't used Reaper in ages but I don't remember this happening.

How do I limit the signal?
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Old 11-14-2012, 08:57 PM   #2
DisarmGoliath
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Turn down the gain on the interface's preamp? That's what you should be doing, because you need to stop the signal clipping BEFORE it is converted into a digital signal by the DAW. Once it hits the DAW (as in, recording - not monitoring), if it is already clipping, it's irreversible.
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Old 11-14-2012, 10:55 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DisarmGoliath
Turn down the gain on the interface's preamp? That's what you should be doing, because you need to stop the signal clipping BEFORE it is converted into a digital signal by the DAW. Once it hits the DAW (as in, recording - not monitoring), if it is already clipping, it's irreversible.


Would turning down the channel fader in Reaper not have the same effect? Doesn't that control the level for the recording?
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Old 11-14-2012, 11:09 PM   #4
ChucklesMginty
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DisarmGoliath
Turn down the gain on the interface's preamp? That's what you should be doing, because you need to stop the signal clipping BEFORE it is converted into a digital signal by the DAW. Once it hits the DAW (as in, recording - not monitoring), if it is already clipping, it's irreversible.


I'll have a look round the settings, I guess something changed since that last time I used it.

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Originally Posted by jetwash69
Would turning down the channel fader in Reaper not have the same effect? Doesn't that control the level for the recording?


No, it just turns down the level of a recording that's already clipping.
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Man, I forgot how freaky those old school movie skeletons are. Especially that jerky stop motion way they move.

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Old 11-14-2012, 11:14 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChucklesMginty
No, it just turns down the level of a recording that's already clipping.


OK. Didn't know 'cause I've always left those virtual faders alone for recording and set the levels on my mixer, which happens to also have a 12-channel USB interface. That way I don't have issues with clipping in the monitors (which I drive from the mixer, not the computer).
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