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Old 12-08-2012, 01:31 PM   #1
ArtistLion
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What are the requirements before starting a band?

I'm thinking about starting a band. I have done some browsing on the time you can start a band. But many sites list information where you can find good band members (interesting info, but not something I need right now).

I want to know what level you got to be (in theory and technicality) before considering to start a band. IMO my skill set doesn't seem band worthy at all. I think that I'm not even mediocre.

This is my current skill marge

Known chords (ones that I don't have to think about/look up):
A, C, D, E, G, Am, Em, Dm (1st position). F and B are still a hit or miss thing.

Highest Chord switching speed: 34 bpm

Known scales(from memory):
A minor pentatonic

Highest scale playing speed: 90 bpm

Bend skills: 1 tone bend from 10th fret to upwards, 1/2 tone bend from 8th fret to upwards

Known unmeasured skills: Hammer-on, pull-off, slide, arpeggio, shuffle rhytm, palm mute

Known theory: I-IV-V shape from 6th string, the notes on the 6th string

Known riffs/licks: Heartbreaker (Led Zeppelin), not on speed; Whole lotta love (Led Zeppelin), not on speed;

Known songs: none >_>

Transcriptions: Dead End, bass section (Final Fantasy 8);
Martial Law, bass section (Final Fantasy 8). I don't know if they are right though. Which brings me to another question, 'how do you guys know whether youre transcriptions are right?'.
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Old 12-08-2012, 01:53 PM   #2
racertj5
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I'd say you need wayyyy more practice before you start a band. Get your chords perfect at the very least then go from there
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Old 12-08-2012, 01:55 PM   #3
Zaphod_Beeblebr
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Do you want to start a band?

If "yes" do it.

Simple.

Quote:
Originally Posted by racertj5
I'd say you need wayyyy more practice before you start a band. Get your chords perfect at the very least then go from there


No he doesn't. All you need to start a band is the will to do so.
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Last edited by Zaphod_Beeblebr : 12-08-2012 at 01:57 PM.
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Old 12-08-2012, 02:05 PM   #4
epicrate
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I started a "band" with a drummer and another guitar player about 2 weeks after getting my first guitar, It sucked, I'm not sure what I expected, what I got was an ear ache, we spent an hour playing nothing loudly, Fast forward a couple months after I learned a few simple songs, and it was much more enjoyable,

Their isn't really any set in stone requirements, If you have a few buddies who play and have similar interest, start jamming, It won't hurt
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Old 12-08-2012, 02:25 PM   #5
AJScott
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There's no point at which is a good point to start a band, but the fact you can remember the name of each chord you know shows that I'd learn a bit more first. I know too many to think off the top of my head, the same with songs and techniques.

Try not to focus on lists like this, find people who are at a similar/higher skill level as you and jam. There is no point at which one is ready for a band, I've been in a band (again too many bands to count) since practically Month 1 of playing guitar and it really helps. You learn together as a group and bounce ideas off each other.
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Old 12-08-2012, 02:39 PM   #6
blazing riff
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AJScott
There's no point at which is a good point to start a band, but the fact you can remember the name of each chord you know shows that I'd learn a bit more first. I know too many to think off the top of my head, the same with songs and techniques.

Try not to focus on lists like this, find people who are at a similar/higher skill level as you and jam. There is no point at which one is ready for a band, I've been in a band (again too many bands to count) since practically Month 1 of playing guitar and it really helps. You learn together as a group and bounce ideas off each other.


+1. Just do it, being in a band is not about being a good player, look at Green day or blink 182. Most of the time they just use 3 or 4 chords, they are not playing at a very technical level but still they made some really catchy music. Just go out there and have fun jamming.
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Old 12-08-2012, 02:49 PM   #7
Nero Galon
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I can't say its what I did but really, if you can get a few friends to play with then it will definitely help you improve because if they know more than you then they would be like a free teacher in some ways and you'll have a good time too.

I have been playing for around 2 years now and never actually jammed with anyone yet. I should get shot.

Because of this I probably have no skills playing with others and all that I know is stuff that i've found in Youtube tutorials and tabs which is enough.

And as for the chords, its only really now that i've started to try and remember what the names are. Obviously I know the common ones such as D, C, G, A, Em and all of that but I couldn't name a single power chord. And its good to start on your barre chords early on because I much prefer to use them over open chords.

The more you expose yourself and sooner, the more and faster you'll learn.
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Old 12-08-2012, 02:56 PM   #8
KG6_Steven
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Reading your massive list of qualifications, I had to chuckle to myself.

If you have to ask us if you're qualified to be in a band, then you're not ready. You will know when you're ready.

Years ago, I was taking lessons from an excellent teacher. I had been taking lessons for about three years, when my instructor set up an opportunity for me to play guitar with another of his students, who was brushing up on his lead skills. It was supposed to be just the two of us messing around on guitar, but it turned out he had invited his complete band. It was an absolute train wreck. They were transposing songs into different keys and I couldn't keep up. I was asked to take a lead part in one song, but knew I wasn't ready for it. It was quite wise of me to decline, as it would have been a mess. I learned some valuable lessons from that day.

When I realized that I was ready, I started playing guitar with a couple of other self-taught guitarists. These guys have been playing for several years and know how to play 2-part rhythm fairly well, but don't know how to play lead. I'm supplying my lead skills and also tossing in fills, riffs and chord fragments.

So, what's the bottom line here? Well, your musical skills are like a foreign language. The more skills you know, the more of the language you know and the better you can communicate. Right now, you're communicating at a very basic level.

So, go ahead and try the band thing, but realize that if you're playing with more capable musicians, it may not go as well you expect.

Edit: Something else I thought of... If all you ever do is play along with recordings in your bedroom, it gives you a false sense of security. The recordings you probably play along with are perfect and nobody ever makes a mistake. Playing with other live players is very dynamic. Other musicians will make mistakes - perhaps even you. When this happens, you have to adjust and compensate. This will make you a better musician.

Last edited by KG6_Steven : 12-08-2012 at 03:02 PM.
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Old 12-08-2012, 03:25 PM   #9
mikey85123
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KG6_Steven
Reading your massive list of qualifications, I had to chuckle to myself.

If you have to ask us if you're qualified to be in a band, then you're not ready. You will know when you're ready.

Years ago, I was taking lessons from an excellent teacher. I had been taking lessons for about three years, when my instructor set up an opportunity for me to play guitar with another of his students, who was brushing up on his lead skills. It was supposed to be just the two of us messing around on guitar, but it turned out he had invited his complete band. It was an absolute train wreck. They were transposing songs into different keys and I couldn't keep up. I was asked to take a lead part in one song, but knew I wasn't ready for it. It was quite wise of me to decline, as it would have been a mess. I learned some valuable lessons from that day.

When I realized that I was ready, I started playing guitar with a couple of other self-taught guitarists. These guys have been playing for several years and know how to play 2-part rhythm fairly well, but don't know how to play lead. I'm supplying my lead skills and also tossing in fills, riffs and chord fragments.

So, what's the bottom line here? Well, your musical skills are like a foreign language. The more skills you know, the more of the language you know and the better you can communicate. Right now, you're communicating at a very basic level.

So, go ahead and try the band thing, but realize that if you're playing with more capable musicians, it may not go as well you expect.

Edit: Something else I thought of... If all you ever do is play along with recordings in your bedroom, it gives you a false sense of security. The recordings you probably play along with are perfect and nobody ever makes a mistake. Playing with other live players is very dynamic. Other musicians will make mistakes - perhaps even you. When this happens, you have to adjust and compensate. This will make you a better musician.


Great post! That's exactly why I am learning music theory and the caged system. It really comes in handy when people start transposing or putting a capo wherever cause it sounds good. If you know theory and caged you can transpose and shift any song anywhere on the neck, and the best part is you can still play lead all over the neck because you are not using a capo.
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Old 12-08-2012, 05:55 PM   #10
Hydra150
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An instrument, or one that you can borrow. And some other people who can also acquire instruments.
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Old 12-08-2012, 07:39 PM   #11
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As long as you don't misrepresent yourself, your abilities, then there's no problem trying to find some friends to practice with. You're bound to find there are other beginners who would rather learn in a group than on their own.
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Old 12-10-2012, 01:27 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blazing riff
+1. Just do it, being in a band is not about being a good player, look at Green day or blink 182. Most of the time they just use 3 or 4 chords, they are not playing at a very technical level but still they made some really catchy music. Just go out there and have fun jamming.


yea, especially GD and blink! I have learned guitar from these two awesome bands
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Old 12-10-2012, 02:46 PM   #13
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In my opinion, it's always a good time to start a band, no matter what your skill level is. Being in a band will subconsciously make you a better player, especially with rhythm. You'll learn a lot.
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Old 12-10-2012, 03:13 PM   #14
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Playing with other people advanced my skill faster in a couple months than plinking in my bedroom alone for 5 years. Also the enjoyment of playing with a full band (even simple chord progressions) is awesome. There will always be some squeeks and sqwaucks until you can get a nice PA. Just gotta do it.
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Old 12-10-2012, 05:23 PM   #15
CHICO 2
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Just put out the word in your circle of friends and you would be surprised how many others are into music that you didn't know about.
Be careful if you choose to put a notice up at your local music store.You could get some shady people that just want to break into your place and steal stuff, remote possibility but something to think about.
I started by learning guitar from scratch with a friend 14 years ago.
My band presently is idle due to a member changing shifts.
It's a drag because it is so much fun and now we can't get together as much. It helps to have others that are crappy as you ,that way nobody gets bored.haha
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Old 12-11-2012, 12:12 PM   #16
Mephaphil
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Punk wasn't about being able to play modes and scales. It was about sending out a message and the music was a tool, it didn't matter if it was perfect, it was meant to be sloppy. DIY, people

And it was awesome. The Clash, the Dead Kennedys. Awesome bands. RIP Joe Strummer.

Anyway, there's no better way to start than to just start. You learn from other musicians. You might find it hard to find people willing to stick with a beginner so find other beginners or get your friends to learn drums, bass etc.

Anyone who says no, you aren't good enough don't realise that you'll only play music that you can play, so you're always ready. It won't sound great at first but no band does.

Good luck and post your first demo on here and don't forget us when you're famous!
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