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Old 12-16-2012, 02:57 PM   #1
Highelf04
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Logic Pro 9- Buses

So essentially, buses?

I know what they are (at least I think I do)
They're used to group individual tracks and to send them to one mixing strip...
So I guess, this would work well with drums and stuff (If I'm right....I have no clue tbh)

Any help here at all?
Like actually setting them up, and properly using them
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Old 12-16-2012, 04:55 PM   #2
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Ok, buses (or aux channels) are essentially places you 'send' the pre-fader mix from a channel to on the mixer, which is separate from the main output (although in Logic, they are routed to the main output by default, though you can route a bus to another bus... which I'll get to in a minute). This, apart from the bit about Logic's default bus output, relates to both analogue mixers in the real world, and the mixer for any typically-laid-out DAW.

So what does that mean? It means that you can have a mix of that channel going to the main output, which is affected by the level the fader is set at. Then you can also send the signal pre-fader (i.e the level is unaffected by the position of the fader) and you control how much of it you send with the rotary fader/'pot' next to that send icon in the Logic channel strip.

Now then... 'why is this of any benefit?', you may ask. Well, there are several reasons, but I'll list the two main reasons I use them.

1) You may want to add the same plug-in to several different tracks (a nice reverb on the toms, for example). Apart from taking longer to set up several instances of the same plug-in, when you get to some of the high-end third party plug-ins they can use up quite a lot of your CPU resources, so if you can use one instance of the plug-in but send several channels to it, you're now doing the digital version of what engineers do with outboard gear when they don't have enough units to dedicate one to each channel it is needed on. It also means you can apply the reverb, and an EQ just for it, and compression etc. completely irrespective of the original channel's signal, and you can then blend the two with the channel fader and the aux channel fader.

2) You can group tracks (in Logic it's Cmd + G to turn on the Group Clutch, and then you have the group menu where you can place tracks into different groups) but this can be tiresome, and sometimes you want tracks in a few groups simultaneously, and navigating through all the groups, and clicking on the right tracks for that can be annoying and slow. Instead, I prefer to create aux channels (buses) for the different sub-groups (Drums, Bass, Rhythm Guitars, Lead Guitars, Vocals etc.) and send the original channels to them, so when I want to adjust the balance of the overall element I just need to use the one fader (instead of Shift + Selecting them all, or using the Group Clutch). This also allows you to easily apply compression to the drums bus or EQ to improve the mix of the drums overall. This is called mixing with sub-groups, and probably a lot of other things, but if someone refers to 'the drum bus' when mixing, it is this they are referring to - a bus/aux channel where all the drum tracks have been sent to, for a pre-output group.


Hope that clears everything up!


Edit: Oh, and to set them up (in Logic), just open up the mixer ('x' is the shortcut) and click + hold on one of the empty boxes below 'Sends'* and then highlight bus, and then select a number, which will then send it to that bus, or create a bus for that input if there isn't one already. Then you will see a little wheel/rotary fader appear, which you click and drag up/right to increase the level of signal sent to the bus. It makes sense to set this to 0dB (remember, it starts at -inf. and then up about 2/3 of the way to get to 0dBFS!) unless you want to send less of the signal than something you're already sending there, in which case you adjust it relative to the other send.

If you want to send the main channel output to a bus, as suggested in option 2 of what I mentioned, you have to click and hold over the box that will say 'Out 1-2' by default, and set that to a bus the same way as mentioned above.

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^everything goliath said.

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Old 12-16-2012, 05:02 PM   #3
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^everything goliath said.
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Old 12-16-2012, 05:10 PM   #4
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Oh, and finally... I meant to explain about sending a bus to a bus and forgot.

If you set up subgroups for the mix, and also have some auxes set up for reverbs etc. you can send the output of the reverb aux(es) to subgroups in the same way as setting the main output of a channel to a bus. This means you can then set the level of the reverb aux(es) for the subgroups with the aux master faders, and then you use the subgroup fader to adjust the level of that subgroup which will also lower the reverb level in check, rather than having to select several faders at once, or keep adjusting the reverb fader as well to keep it relative to the rest of the subgroup without messing up the balance of reverb vs subgroup.
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Old 12-16-2012, 06:26 PM   #5
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That was a long read xD

Cheers man, I appreciate it
I'm gonna start trying to use 'buses' in my recordings now...
It seems the proper thing to do xD

Thanks for the explanation on it, I appreciate that
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Old 12-16-2012, 08:06 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Highelf04
That was a long read xD

Yeah, I have a habit of doing that...

Quote:
Cheers man, I appreciate it
I'm gonna start trying to use 'buses' in my recordings now...
It seems the proper thing to do xD

Thanks for the explanation on it, I appreciate that

No problem - if you get stuck, I'm a Logic Pro user myself so PM me if you need to, though I think everything I said is what and where it should be in Logic (not at the Mac at the moment, so can't check I remembered it all correctly to the finest details!).

If you can get your head around it all from what I wrote, it will greatly improve your workflow when mixing if you can get into the habit of bussing tracks to subgroups (especially if you send a rough mix to someone you're working with, and they ask for 'the vocals to be a tiny bit quieter' or 'the drums need to be a bit brighter', as you can just lower the fader by 0.5-1dB or put a little high-end boost on the drum group and send them a new bounce of the mix).
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