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Old 12-19-2012, 02:24 PM   #1
Andre Lopes
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Books To Boost my Musician Course

Hi Guys, i love your tab website.

Anyway,
I need help :P
I want some amazon Books to give me more knowledge that i dont have yet.
I had some months of guitar courses but i stopped
i will return now, and i want to speed it up by reading some books of theory and figure wth is pentatonic scales :P

Would you guys recommend me any bible of guitar?
Size doesnt Scares me, what scares me its buy it and regret it later because it sucks;



I love this website

Cya
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Old 12-20-2012, 05:08 AM   #2
Sickz
Jazz Musician
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
When it comes to guitar, there is only 2 books i recommend.

The Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine and Creative guitar by Guthrie Govan.

The jazz theory book does a great job of teaching you theory, from easy to advanced. If you really want to progress as a musician, theory is a great thing to have, and getting into jazz theory will help you in alot of ways, or atleast give you new ideas. But i admit, it won't be easy. I got the book a while ago, and i have a long way to go before i can understand everything fully. I had a pretty good foundation on theory but after 30 pages i was lost. But yeah, if you are looking at expanding your horizons and expanding your knowledge of theory, one of the best IF NOT the best i own. But that's just my opinion.

Creative guitar is a great book for both basic theory but mainly for technique. Guthrie goes into great detail with all the commonly used techniques there is, and supplies you with exercises to practice these techniques. It also contains techniques borrowed from other instruments, for example he explains how to do slapping on guitar. An overall great book for anyone thinking about improving or expanding their technique.

On the other hand i believe learning stuff by ear is the best thing you can do as a musician. Transcribing songs by bands and artists you like (not only guitar parts, but parts by other instruments aswell) is probably the best thing you can do to improve and develop in a way that you'd like.
__________________
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote:
Originally Posted by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
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Old 12-20-2012, 05:52 AM   #3
socrfb
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Join Date: Dec 2011
I've got 3 books I'd recommend, all of them from Amazon for less than $15 each. The first is Guitar Aerobics by Troy Nelson. It's a 1 year course filled with exercises that are organized by techniques. The exercises start off fairly simple and gradually progress in difficulty.

How it works is for each exercise it'll give you a genre to use and a bpm range to use. You're supposed to do 10 reps for 10 sets, with speed gradually progressing as you go. I just use the backing drum tracks that come with it, each one is 89 seconds long so if you sit through the whole thing you'll be doing a little less than or more than 10 reps before moving on to the next speed, but it's easier than counting how many times you do the lick at the higher speeds. For example, the rock/blues tracks start at 40bpm then ends at 120bpm, but the metal tracks start at 40bpm and end at 112bpm, but each genre has 10 speeds. It takes only 15 minutes to go through them, but that's if you can do them without any problems. It goes over 7 techniques, 1 each day of the week:

Monday: Alternate Picking
Tuesday: String Skipping
Wednesday: String Bending
Thursday: Arpeggios
Friday: Sweeping
Saturday: Legato
Sunday: Rhythm

The second book is for theory. It's Music Theory for Guitarists by Tom Kolb. Starts off with simple stuff like the basics of reading music, then over time it progresses into scales, modes, chord construction, etc. It occasionally (I think 1 per chapter) does a little quiz to apply what you just read on paper.

The third book is Guitar Fretboard Workbook from Hal Leonard. Basically it helps you learn your way around the fretboard like all the notes up the neck, finding particular notes, modes, scales, triads, etc. It's a workbook, so you're supposed to do the activities, then practice them. It uses the idea that applying the idea on paper is essential before actually practicing it. The book recommends going through it over the course of a year, which would be a chapter every 2-3 weeks, but it's ultimately up to you.

Last edited by socrfb : 12-20-2012 at 05:54 AM.
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Old 12-23-2012, 09:23 AM   #4
Andre Lopes
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Join Date: Dec 2012
Guys, im so sorry i got too long to reply!!
I started looking those books and it seems really nice;

Im mostly looking for Theory Books, because i have little of that.
And i like reading massive-info books XD

I know almost nothing of theory.
Just the basic.

Which one of those books below should i start with ?
Im just worried they arent complete enough, because they are only 50~~ 100 pages
Are they "complete" ? I mean, can i have an overral knowledge with them ?
Which one i pick first?


Music Theory for Guitarists by Tom Kol
http://www.amazon.com/Music-Theory-...+for+Guitarists
Just 100 pages ?


http://www.amazon.com/Guitar-Fretbo...tboard+Workbook
80 pages


http://www.amazon.com/Guitar-Aerobi...Guitar+Aerobics
100 pages
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Old 12-23-2012, 10:27 AM   #5
Andre Lopes
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Join Date: Dec 2012
I read some pages of Music Theory for Guitarists – Tom Kolb before buying it, and i didnt like it, because i dont understand those partitures >.<
I only understand tablatures!!
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Old 12-23-2012, 10:39 AM   #6
Andre Lopes
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Join Date: Dec 2012
Should i still try it ? I think it teaches partitures..
I dont know how hard it is !
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Old 12-24-2012, 07:29 AM   #7
Sickz
Jazz Musician
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
The music theory book by Mark Levine is basically as complete you can get in my opinion. It's about 540 pages long and it's pure theory. It's not "theory for guitarists" or "theory for pianists" it's theory for musicians, it can be applied to whatever.

I advice you to not purchase it if your not comfortable with sheet music though.

Maybe you should start with some more basic theory before you go about purchasing a big book on theory?

Check out the website "Musictheory.net". It teaches you how to read sheet music and the basic fundamentals of music theory.
__________________
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote:
Originally Posted by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
Sickz is offline   Reply With Quote
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