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Old 12-27-2012, 07:07 PM   #1
Fouks
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Intervals

Hello.

Im starting to understand how intervals work, but i really can't figure out the meaning of inversions.

I know that a perfect inverts to a perfect, minor to major etc. But let's say that i have a perfect fourth (in the scale of C) which is an F and it then inverts to a perfect fifth which is a G. Can i play these two notes together on the guitar and they will be a perfect fifth, or how does it work?
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Old 12-27-2012, 07:10 PM   #2
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When you invert an interval, you change the quality.

The interval is dictated by the relationship of the top note to the bottom.

If you play a C-G, it's a fifth. It sounds as a fifth, and the relationship is a fifth.
If you flip it to G-C, it's a fourth. It sounds as a fourth, the relationship is a fourth.

The concept of inverting intervals is primarily for understanding and realizing symmetry and as a tool for organizing and memorizing intervals.
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Last edited by chronowarp : 12-27-2012 at 07:12 PM.
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Old 12-27-2012, 07:10 PM   #3
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An inverstion is when you take one of the notes and move it to the otherside of the other note by an octave to create a new interval.

That might sound confusing so if you have C up to F then to invert that interval you would take the C and move it up an octave to the other side of the F. Then you would have F up to C.

Alternatively you could take the F on that original C up to F interval and move it down an octave to the other side of the C. The result would be F up to C (or C down to F).

Note that C up to F is a perfect fourth. But an interval from F up to C is a perfect fifth.

You can do this with any interval.


So with A and C: A up to C is a minor third and is the same as C down to A. The inversion of this is A down to C (or C up to A) which is a Major sixth.
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Old 12-27-2012, 07:12 PM   #4
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An interval is two notes. I think you're confusing scale degrees and intervals.

C-F is an interval (a perfect 4th). If you invert it to F-C you get a perfect fifth.
B-D (minor 3rd) inverts to D-B (major 6th)
A-Eb (diminished 5th) inverts to Eb-A (augmented 4th)
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Old 12-27-2012, 07:13 PM   #5
mdc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20Tigers
Note that C up to F is a perfect fifth. But an interval from F up to C is a perfect fourth.

Typo?
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Old 12-27-2012, 07:17 PM   #6
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Ahh, that made everything clear. Thank you guys.
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Old 12-27-2012, 07:19 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mdc
Typo?

oops - thanks, -fixed.
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