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Old 12-26-2012, 12:19 PM   #1
mrdanny
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Improvisation

Hey, I am interested in improvising in my guitar but I don't know how, what I always do is to put a backingtrack like a "blues in A" and I play random notes from the pentatonic minor in the 5th in the 6chord...
I don't know music theory, I want to know what notes I can play or scales to make a good blues sounding in all my guitar and not to be so limited by using only the pentatonic minor in A... When I say blues I am speaking in all genres, I don't know how it works....

Thanks
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Old 12-26-2012, 12:22 PM   #2
mdc
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What blues records do you have in your collection?
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Old 12-26-2012, 12:30 PM   #3
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No answer? S'ok. I know the answer.

I just find it worrying when people want to play a genre of music... but they don't even listen to it as it's not on their shelf, or on their iTunes.

If you want to learn how to speak a language, then go and live that country, you know?
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Old 12-26-2012, 12:36 PM   #4
mrdanny
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I just go to youtube and search for a backingtrack, I play any video I find who's usually called "any" style in "any note""
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Old 12-26-2012, 12:48 PM   #5
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1) Learn the major scale. Then the relative minor scale. Congratulations! You now know blues and lots of other musical styles! Yay! Do all this while listening to all the blues you can, in all forms, listen to Jazz too.

2) Impatient? Learn all 5 pentatonic shapes. Then learn the blues scales. Yay! Blues!

3) Even more impatient? Learn lots of Jimi Hendrix, SRV, Jeff Beck etc.

If you start from anything but the top you'll miss vital information, but you can get away with starting with option 2 and do very well. Start at number 3 and you're not much more than a parrot.

It's up to you. Get a teacher though, and listen to loads of blues.

What do you listen to now?
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Old 12-26-2012, 01:50 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mephaphil
1) Learn the major scale. Then the relative minor scale. Congratulations! You now know blues and lots of other musical styles! Yay! Do all this while listening to all the blues you can, in all forms, listen to Jazz too.

Not really. If you know your major and minor scales, you have the tools to learn a style, but saying you know the major scale and thus know the blues is like saying I know the specs of a Honda Odyssey and thus are an F-1 driver. There's a little more to it than just scales.

The secret to improvising isn't in playing. It's in listening. Any idiot can regurgitate scales over a progression and sound in tune. Anyone can go into autopilot and play notes from a scale and sound mediocre. The guys who are truly excellent at improvising melodies are the ones who can listen to a chord progression and get it into their head, hear a melodic line in their head that both follows and leads the progression, then reproduce it through their instrument.

If you want to get good at blue improvisation, you'll want to listen to a lot of blues improvisation, good and bad. Get those blues progressions in your head. Once they seep into your mind, start humming. Then try to figure out how to play what you were humming. If you do this enough, eventually, you'll get to the point where it gets easier and easier to figure out what you were humming over a progression. Then, one day, you'll just start playing first instead of having to hum.
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Old 12-26-2012, 03:03 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geldin
Not really. If you know your major and minor scales, you have the tools to learn a style, but saying you know the major scale and thus know the blues is like saying I know the specs of a Honda Odyssey and thus are an F-1 driver. There's a little more to it than just scales.

The secret to improvising isn't in playing. It's in listening. Any idiot can regurgitate scales over a progression and sound in tune. Anyone can go into autopilot and play notes from a scale and sound mediocre. The guys who are truly excellent at improvising melodies are the ones who can listen to a chord progression and get it into their head, hear a melodic line in their head that both follows and leads the progression, then reproduce it through their instrument.

If you want to get good at blue improvisation, you'll want to listen to a lot of blues improvisation, good and bad. Get those blues progressions in your head. Once they seep into your mind, start humming. Then try to figure out how to play what you were humming. If you do this enough, eventually, you'll get to the point where it gets easier and easier to figure out what you were humming over a progression. Then, one day, you'll just start playing first instead of having to hum.


Some points I agree with, others I don't. I was being slightly facetious and giving the guy a starting point.

Scales enable you to work out melodies easily. Without knowing it you'll be blindly stabbing at notes while I've already worked it out because I know what I'm humming is a minor 3rd followed by whatever.

Unless you've managed to somehow work out the major scale and all the pentatonic shapes you're going to be stuck in familiar patterns and/or making mistakes.

Sure you're right, there's loads of people who know loads of theory but are crap at phrasing or haven't listened to enough blues, haven't developed their ear etc, but in my experience they'll eventually catch up and overtake people who always play in the same position and think scales and theory are pointless. There's far more people who know very little than those who know a lot, and a good basis to improve is so much better than spending 20 years playing the same crap. This includes everything you said, but with a greater emphasis on understanding what you're playing. Which is why I said listen to lots of blues, and jazz as you'll normally write in a similar way to what you listen to, and you'll understand it.

Please note how I listed the methods in importance and how I explained the reasons behind it. You can't define blues, neither can I, but if I know the major scale and understand it I can start to mess around with blues like melodies. If I know shape 4 of the blues scale I might do it quicker but by understanding the base formula I'll be better grounded in the future.

I feel like I've already explained this. It can't help to expand on it though
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Last edited by Mephaphil : 12-26-2012 at 03:08 PM.
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Old 12-27-2012, 08:39 AM   #8
mrdanny
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well, I listen to all kinds of styles, more oriented to rock/metal, but I love blues and jazz at the time, thanks for all answers there are helpfull, just want to know where I can play the scales, if I learn for example the major scale, and I have to play the song in "c" where I can play it? in all the "c" notes of the guitar and to the scales there or.. I don't know...
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Old 12-27-2012, 09:17 AM   #9
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Sounds like you may need to start here:

https://www.google.com/search?q=gui...iw=1182&bih=819

Study these fretboard diagrams then start asking questions. If you have the means an instructor is the best way to learn this stuff.
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Old 12-27-2012, 02:59 PM   #10
Mephaphil
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Quote:
Originally Posted by demonhellcat
Sounds like you may need to start here:

https://www.google.com/search?q=gui...iw=1182&bih=819

Study these fretboard diagrams then start asking questions. If you have the means an instructor is the best way to learn this stuff.


That couldn't confuse a person anymore if it tried.

Go to www.justinguitar.com and follow the lesson guides, it's second best to having a teacher but it's an ok start, just try and stay on that site rather than jump from one to another as you might get side tracked.
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Old 12-28-2012, 01:20 PM   #11
mrdanny
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Thanks to you all I'll get an intensity train of music theory for guitar and scales and listen to more music's for improvising, well, and thanks for the website, it's a good base!
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Old 12-30-2012, 01:49 AM   #12
nickeftink
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Play in the right key, use your scales and modes, and practice it to a jamtrack of a key you want to work on.. Then, just feel it, I guess. The more you improvise the more little riffs and patterns you'll find effective in your playing for when the improvisation will really count, haha.
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