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Old 01-06-2013, 10:12 PM   #1
ChucklesMginty
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What if I worked at it for years, but just never had a voice I liked?

I mean shit, I'd be happy just singing and playing bass in a pop punk group playing blink-182 or some shit. In fact I'd love to do that, no range required for the most part. But I have the shittiest voice, I hate my voice even just talking it's so annoying.

I mean take someone like Joe Satriani, he obviously worked at singing. But he just has the flattest (in tone) voice ever and it's lame. I could easily see that happening for me.

Or someone like James Labrie - huge range and control (well kinda...) But a lot of people just hate his tone, but that's his voice. He can't change it.

"I could never imagine you having a nice voice honestly" I've heard that from quite a few people.

Anyone relate? It makes it hard to get motivated.
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Last edited by ChucklesMginty : 01-06-2013 at 10:13 PM.
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Old 01-06-2013, 11:26 PM   #2
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You have no idea how good your voice could be, and you won't, until you work at it.

Ultimately, if your voice doesn't make a sound that you like, you'll have to work with a singer. There are worse things. Sure there's a risk in working on your voice (although I suspect you'll be able to make enough progress to help with harmony parts, etc) but you know what? There's a risk in not working on your voice, too! What if you could be good but don't give yourself the chance?
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Old 01-06-2013, 11:50 PM   #3
food1010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HotspurJr
You have no idea how good your voice could be, and you won't, until you work at it.

Ultimately, if your voice doesn't make a sound that you like, you'll have to work with a singer. There are worse things. Sure there's a risk in working on your voice (although I suspect you'll be able to make enough progress to help with harmony parts, etc) but you know what? There's a risk in not working on your voice, too! What if you could be good but don't give yourself the chance?
Good advice.

You can change a lot about your voice with technique. I wouldn't ever assume that learning proper vocal technique isn't worth doing. Honestly, I think everyone who enjoys music should have vocal training.

Sure you may never have the exact sound you want, but you have to embrace what you do have.

You should upload some clips of you singing.

I'm assuming you've listened to recordings of your voice before?
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Last edited by food1010 : 01-06-2013 at 11:51 PM.
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Old 01-07-2013, 12:08 AM   #4
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Never, I sing quietly along to songs sometimes. I had a vocal lesson just the once at school and did some warm ups, probably one of the only times I've sang loudly.
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Old 01-07-2013, 12:34 AM   #5
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You should do it. It may be worse than you think, but then again it might be better. Either way, it'll be incredibly informative. If you end up hating it, good. That's the first step to getting better. You can't improve if you don't know what you need to improve. I mean, diaphragm support and some diction will never do you wrong, but if you know exactly what you don't like about your voice, then you know exactly what you need to work on.

Just lock yourself in a room for a bit and lay down a couple tracks. Make sure you sing out. Do a couple different styles. Maybe something mellow and lower in pitch and then something more high and belty. Anything in between would be useful as well. Just make sure nobody is around if you don't want them to hear you and don't worry if it sounds good, just do it.

If you don't want to post it here, that's fine. Believe me, I've been there. My voice used to be horrendous. I still don't like singing out loud around other people. It's really more of a mental block than anything.

However, there are a lot of people here that could give you boatloads of good advice if you were to post your clips. Remember, you'll never get any better unless you take that first step.

I hope this has instilled even the slightest bit of confidence (or maybe hope would be a better word). Either way, you'll be surprised how much better your voice will sound with some technique under your belt.
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Old 01-07-2013, 02:21 AM   #6
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You have to put work in if you want a good voice. Alot of singers were once like you, hated how their voice sounded etc, it takes years of training to develop a REALLY good voice, howeve,r everyone progresses differently(some people are naturals and can sing great right off the bat) you can get decent in about 6 months with a good vocal coach, it depends alot on your work ethic though.

As far as Satriani and Labie, maybe thats how they want to sound? Just because you dont like their voice doesn't mean thousands of others dont. Different strokes for different folks. Yes, everyone has their own vocal timbre, but with proper technique and alot of passion anyones select timbre can sound amazing. Ken Tamplin can imitate pretty much any singer, he gets a sound very close to the original singer, so can other great learned singers, your voice can make ALOT of different tones if you learn properly. .
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Old 01-08-2013, 04:49 AM   #7
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Play the hand you've been dealt.

Own your voice. it is what it is. You can learn to control it (pitch, breath, improve tone etc) but don't worry about what other people say. There's nothing wrong with having a unique voice. Learn to work with what you've got.
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Old 01-08-2013, 07:07 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChucklesMginty
I mean take someone like Joe Satriani, he obviously worked at singing. But he just has the flattest (in tone) voice ever and it's lame. I could easily see that happening for me.

There's no such thing as flat tone. I think you're definitely referring to bad technique. Maybe bad vocal placement or support, I can't tell for sure...

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChucklesMginty
Or someone like James Labrie - huge range and control (well kinda...) But a lot of people just hate his tone, but that's his voice. He can't change it.

His tone is amazing. It's just that most metalheads are used to harsher vocals instead of more operatic vocals. And that's just a difference in technique and approach.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChucklesMginty
"I could never imagine you having a nice voice honestly" I've heard that from quite a few people.

Seriously that seems unlikely although without having heard you I can't really give an opinion. Some genre might fit your voice better but if you're determined enough you can also "make the genre fit your voice".

Actually, I believe most people hate their voice especially when they hear it recorded. It just sounds different than what you hear in your head.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doveri
This topic is completely true with me. I've been singing for 4 years, i can hit notes from a2-c#6 without thinking, BUT, i sound like complete utter garbage in any of my notes. my chest voice is extremely dull sounding, my mix voice is semi-decent but still has this inherent squeezed/unnatural sound, I have no transition from my mix to head voice, and my head voice always has a 100% pure falsetto sound regardless of how I attempt to change it.


There's a difference between singing for 4 years and training for 4 years. I imagine these C#6 are just squeals. If you've really been training for 4 years you should at least be able to bridge chest/head voice. So stop worrying about range...if you can master the notes up to C5 you're almost covered.

Last edited by Sethis : 01-08-2013 at 07:14 PM.
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Old 01-09-2013, 06:25 PM   #9
Duce180
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You could work on doing head voice exercises on "Gee" and "Goo" on a piano scale. The G provides solid cord closure, that can help with power in your high range. You have to develop your "high mix" (in SLS terms), its a tricky part of the voice, you have to get the right resonance from head and chest voice. I would seek a vocal coach to access and train that part of your voice, in the meantime the head voice exercies should help a bit.

(To Doveri)
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