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Old 01-03-2013, 10:54 AM   #1
Gemisha
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Question Recording degree college recommend

Okay, before you guys start to take 'reality gun' and shoot my dream, I KNOW already how hard it's to go in music industry. Either this or the easy way out

First,
I want to learn and the only way to get the best of it by going to college.
I could learn by myself but it wont be enough.
Internet may be good but I wont know which one is correct or dead wrong.

Second,
I already read the older post and since it's posted back in 2009 and there only a few college that I see, MTSU, full sail, etc.
Maybe by now there are more recommendation for me

So, anyone can recommend me any good college preferably that wont put a hole in my pocket and does anyone also can posted what are the basic requirement for admission?
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Old 01-03-2013, 11:12 AM   #2
oneblackened
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I've applied to SUNY Purchase and UMass Lowell as far as cheap(ish) recording schools go. UMass is only cheap because I live in MA.
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Old 01-03-2013, 11:15 AM   #3
lockwolf
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Community College. I honestly wouldn't go for a bachelors in recording arts, especially since you are going to pay out the ass for a college offering a bachelors and since its a job you're definitely not guaranteed a job in at all, I wouldn't risk a life in debt to go after it. Lets break it down this way:

Full Sail's Recording Arts Bachelors Degree is 5 semesters at $15,000 a semester for tuition only (not including books, living expenses, ect). That puts you at $75,000 for tuition and that doesn't include books, required software, living expenses, ect.

Now, though probably not in your area, my local community college's recoridng arts Associates degree. 6 Quarters at $2,000 a quarter, including lab fees, books, instructors fees, and such. That puts me at $12,000 for a 2 year.

For the price of 1 semester at Full Sail, you can probably get your Associates in Recording at a local community college and learn a ton of the same things. The only huge difference is Full Sail is probably a lot nicer but thats why you're paying $15,000 every semester. You'll learn a lot of the same things, just in a fancier place with newer nicer gear.

Still, I work with a guy who went to school for Recording. Obviously, he's working with me at Target, not in a big fancy studio and we know a lot of the same things and 95% of what I've learned is either from online or reading books :p
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Old 01-04-2013, 11:23 PM   #4
Owen Gillett
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Hi Gemisha,

I think you are very wise to realise you need to study to truly gain the depth of knowledge you need.

I studied at SAE and eventually finished a Diploma. Although you only really start learning one you get a job and apply all the knowledge you have aquired, you DO need the background of education to tie it all together.

I'm not sure how expensive SAE is in your part of the world but you can usually do it part time which will make it cheaper.

I ended up doing work experience in every studio in Adelaide (which is a city of about 1 million people is Australia) and eventually, by making myself indispensable, got a position in a studio, eventually building that up to being head engineer. The fact that I had actual education as an engineer is what made a lot of the studios receptive to having me in for work experience.

It's not about luck. It's about creating the opportunities for yourself.

And finally, the expense is what it is: an investment which you can't put a price on if it is the ticket to getting where you want to go!

Best of luck,

Owen Gillett
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Old 01-05-2013, 10:08 AM   #5
axemanchris
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This question is one I have answered a few times on this forum, so I added it to my blog instead of searching and copying/pasting.

See, you're working on the false premise that "First,
I want to learn and the only way to get the best of it by going to college."

Give this a read:

http://greenroommusicblog.blogspot....erengineer.html

Don't just read the reality check part and stop reading, though.

CT
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Old 01-06-2013, 07:32 AM   #6
Gemisha
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@axemanchris I understand what u r saying but i will assume you're from US. I come from Malaysia, Music industry here it almost to none and what you're applying it just one way of the road I can take. Who said I can be a student and be an intern at the same time.

@Owen Gillett SAE malaysia only provide diploma and It's expensive
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Old 01-06-2013, 07:42 AM   #7
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I complete agree in regards to the autodidactic approach. If you surround yourself with the right people and you're prepared to experiment and study, you can surpass most college-educated people.

If I were a poverty-stricken young man, I'd be tempted to forge a diploma once I'd reached a provably legitimate level of performance.
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Old 01-06-2013, 10:43 AM   #8
axemanchris
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Do you want to work in Malaysia where there is, as you put it, almost no music industry? If the answer is yes, I really don't know what to tell you. If the answer is that you want to work in the US or whereever (I'm in Canada), then maybe come here first and then get your training.

CT
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Old 01-06-2013, 11:48 PM   #9
Owen Gillett
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gemisha

@Owen Gillett SAE malaysia only provide diploma and It's expensive



I think a Diploma is probably enough to get started depending on what your end goal is. In terms of the cost, again, it depends on what your end goal is as to how important it is for you to invest in it.

There is always a way to overcome the challenges whether they be financial or time or both. It's really just a matter of what you want to achieve and how badly you want it.

I only did a diploma and to be honest, this suited me because I wanted to just get out there and work. Since I have become a professional studio engineer and mastering engineer.

If you wanted to be doing plug-in coding for reverbs and going into the belly of psychoacoustics etc then I'm sure you'd need to go much further into theory/study.

Even doing a Cert III would help you a lot if you are just wanting to learn to record your own music better.

Again, Best of luck.

Owen Gillett

PS: I thought I knew a thing or 2 about recording before I studied and then promptly found out that I knew almost nothing. It was like a revelation realising how deep the wells of knowledge are. Sometimes the most valuable thing is to know when you don't know. You will go much further in life once you do!
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Old 01-07-2013, 08:10 PM   #10
DisarmGoliath
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Ok, I'm not sure if this will fall on deaf ears but I'll try anyway, even though Chris and lockwolf have already tried to iterate this...

To my knowledge I'm one of a few people, if not the only person, posting here who has actually been to university to study Sound Engineering & Production (the official title of my degree, which was a BSc [Bachelor of Science]) at degree level. I didn't actually complete the course though, I decided to drop out in the second year, but aside from feeling the course wasn't relevant enough for what I wanted, I'll list my reasons.


1) It's a hell of a lot of money, and the way the music industry is these days (lots of studios closing down, less money in recording, more and more people fighting for the jobs and getting into the trade as a hobby), it is very difficult to get a job with a degree like this - and aside from a few graduate programs, unless you are able to demonstrate knowledge of other audio-related subjects it is difficult to crossover into other fields with the degree.


2) While I had a few good lecturers who were very helpful, I didn't actually learn that much from uni in some respects - one guy in particular taught me a lot about electronics, but in recording or mixing or ___ respects, most of what I learned at uni was actually through my own research often inspired by something a lecturer had hinted at. In fact, being around other like-minded individuals I was able to discover a few good places to get resources from, but a lot of the knowledge I've picked up since I started to seriously get into audio engineering in 2008, has been through the internet (forums, mainly this one), magazines (Sound On Sound is my favourite, though occasional Tape Op have some good articles) and books (Mixing With Your Mind, Mastering Audio, Recording Engineers Handbook etc.).


3) Even some of the best lecturers had an element of gear snobbery, as much as I hugely respect them, so it was often quite easy to appear to have an answer for something by name-dropping expensive gear rather than being specific about what you would do with it, and despite some of the amazing things we had access to (there were several studios and many mixrooms, plus an anechoic chamber) I don't feel we looked deep enough into why certain things were done until quite late in the course. Some stuff was obsessed over when it was far too basic or simple and that frustrated me, whereas other stuff that was taught seemed so irrelevant and almost like it was done to give a larger syllabus and gain the 'BSc' status instead of to give knowledge of 'Sound Engineering'.


Ok, a lot of the problem was probably that the course wasn't right for me, but I definitely think you need to try and speak to as many current and past students as possible and see what they think of it. I miss uni itself, but I don't regret my decision not to stick at it, and onl wish I'd saved myself more money by dropping out sooner. Since dropping out, I've continued my passion for the subject in my own time, while actually working a normal job to earn money and get my own flat with my gf etc. and I've recorded bands since, including recording and mixing my own band's album which was released in April 2012 and on Jan 18th 2013 it is coming out on vinyl, through a German record label (Pure Steel Records) who we signed a deal with licensing the use of the album on vinyl and it's on sale worldwide. I also have potential upcoming work with bands I've met through gigging, and a band who have accepted my terms etc. for recording a few tracks in the near future, which I'll be paid for and apart from some of the knowledge on the subject, university helped me with very little of this.


So, to close this near-essay ( ) I'd basically like to say that to get a lot out of university you have to put a hell of a lot in (MatrixClaw, the other mod here, has just graduated on a different subject and can probably attest to the workload you'll have) and aren't guaranteed any job or benefits afterwards. I'm not saying "don't go to uni", but I am saying "make sure you are certain it is the right thing for you" first.
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Old 01-08-2013, 01:04 PM   #11
Gemisha
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I'm still undecided that why I'm posting but if my intention were to go and work in US. IN you're guys opinion which one is better at least test the water first or just jump straight in?

I don't want to "jump into the sea looking for the treasure when I don't know how to swim"
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Old 01-08-2013, 01:21 PM   #12
ChemicalFire
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Thing is you don't have to go to college to learn how to mix... or in your metaphor "swim".

I think that's the crux of most of the arguments in this thread. The cons of going to a professional college out way the pros unless you know the education will be a) good and b) useful later on.
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Old 01-09-2013, 01:22 PM   #13
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I think your time and resources would be better spent avoiding those pricey schools that are all image. The truth is that even the top guys are struggling in the industry climate of today. I would recommend getting your chops at a community college program.
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Old 01-09-2013, 01:32 PM   #14
Gemisha
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I'm in between public or community right now.. But price aside which one is better going for 4 years or 2 years programme
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