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Old 01-10-2013, 11:05 AM   #1
Dark Raven X
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Fret hand during sweeps

I think sweep is the term I'm looking for? Just got back into proper playing after that Rocksmith game got it's hooks into me. As fun as it is, it's practice modes leave a lot to be desired, namely in explaining how I should be positioning my hand to play this more complex stuff.

Say I gotta hit 9 notes in around a second; ie 14, 15, 17 on the G, then 14, 16, 17 on the B, 14, 15, 16 on the e, all as one fluid string of notes.

First thing; should I be trying to pluck each individual note? Going back to the game - it's not displaying these as hammer ons, but as regular notes so I'm guessing I should really be picking em all, but it's hard not to play em as triplets rather than one long sequence. Any advice for string switching while keeping a rhythm?

My other big problem is moving my index off the 14 on the low string up to the next before I'm due to hit that one; should I be moving my whole hand up at the end of the first 3 notes super quick, or do I need to have moved my index to the next string up as soon as I've hit it?
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Old 01-10-2013, 11:29 AM   #2
theogonia777
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I don't think sweep is the term that you're looking for.

Really you could pick each note or play them as hammer-ons, or even a combination of the two. Make sure to take note of the difference in sound between the two. It's a matter of preference in terms of what feels better to you and what sounds more appropriate for what you're playing.

As far as rhythm, just the basic "play slowly with a metronome" thing is great. Also it might help try to count the notes in your head. As a bluegrass banjo player myself, I sometimes find this to be helpful for tremolo picking since I have to use three fingers to play notes in multiples of four.

Rather than 1-2-3 1-2-3 1-2-3 try counting 1-2-3-4 1-2-3-4 etc with the 4th note in the first four being the first note on the second string you play on in the lick and the 1st and 2nd of the second count of four being the next two notes and so on. Unless you are going for triplet feel (triplets being a steady 1-2-3 rather than a 1-2-3-(4) with the (4) being the last half of the 3rd note; I thought I should mention this since many guitarists incorrectly refer to that "galloping" sort of rhythm as triples and I wanted to make that clear), in which case the 1-2-3 1-2-3 etc would be appropriate.

That's personally what works for me as far as rhythm and picking vs legato, so maybe it would be of use to you.
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Old 01-10-2013, 11:31 AM   #3
Zaphod_Beeblebr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dark Raven X
I think sweep is the term I'm looking for? Just got back into proper playing after that Rocksmith game got it's hooks into me. As fun as it is, it's practice modes leave a lot to be desired, namely in explaining how I should be positioning my hand to play this more complex stuff.

Say I gotta hit 9 notes in around a second; ie 14, 15, 17 on the G, then 14, 16, 17 on the B, 14, 15, 16 on the e, all as one fluid string of notes.

First thing; should I be trying to pluck each individual note? Going back to the game - it's not displaying these as hammer ons, but as regular notes so I'm guessing I should really be picking em all, but it's hard not to play em as triplets rather than one long sequence. Any advice for string switching while keeping a rhythm?

My other big problem is moving my index off the 14 on the low string up to the next before I'm due to hit that one; should I be moving my whole hand up at the end of the first 3 notes super quick, or do I need to have moved my index to the next string up as soon as I've hit it?


There's a few things here to say things about so here goes:

Then Rocksmith has taken you more or less as far as it can (I always knew this would be a problem with it). Don't stop playing the game, I'm sure it's fun, but definitely move to other ways of learning.

Then yes, if something isn't marked as being legato (i.e. hammers and pull-offs) then it defaults to being picked.

Just a note on terminology: if it was in triplets it would still be one unbroken sequence. Triplets are three evenly spaced notes per beat so if it was written as triplets it would all be rhythmically the same.

Start slow, make sure you're doing it right slowly and speed up when you're comfortable with what you're doing at any given speed. When I say comfortable I mean that it shouldn't take any thought to play the line, that's how you know you're ready to move on.

This is somewhat hard to explain: when you're done fretting a note you should relax the finger you were using to fret. Don't lift it or anything, just stop putting pressure on the strings. Then when you need it again (for the first note on the next string in this case) you should fret there.

Thing is... this is an idealized process, it takes a lot of very focused, extremely slow, practice to get even close to this. The thing you should be focusing on is getting the finger to where it needs to be in time, don't move the whole lot of fingers at once; you won't have time and it'll leave the last note on the string before sounding too short.


Finally: what you're talking about is definitely not a sweep, as sweep is a way of playing lines where there's one note on each string and the picking hand makes one smooth motion across all the strings in one direction.

I think I've got some decent answers out there; if you need clarification on anything don't hesitate to ask back here.
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Last edited by Zaphod_Beeblebr : 01-10-2013 at 11:34 AM.
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Old 01-10-2013, 12:45 PM   #4
weaseldog43
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Dude, if all the first notes are on the fourteenth fret, then barre it with your index finger - economy of motion is the primary principle for performing at speed exercises and complex passages. Also, you should be using alternate picking and to accomodate the switch to the next string, start the passage with an up-stroke so that when you switch strings you'll be on a down stroke, and since your index finger is already fretting the note becasue it's barred there should be no issues with quick trasitions.
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Old 01-10-2013, 12:55 PM   #5
Zaphod_Beeblebr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weaseldog43
Dude, if all the first notes are on the fourteenth fret, then barre it with your index finger - economy of motion is the primary principle for performing at speed exercises and complex passages.


No. Dear lord no. By doing this all you're going to do is make muting much harder. Notes ringing together will sound infinitely worse than having to wait a while before playing it up to speed will.

Quote:
Originally Posted by weaseldog43
Also, you should be using alternate picking and to accomodate the switch to the next string, start the passage with an up-stroke so that when you switch strings you'll be on a down stroke, and since your index finger is already fretting the note becasue it's barred there should be no issues with quick trasitions.


It's across 3 strings, if strict alternate picking is being used then both inside and outside picking will have to happen. Starting on an upstroke may work better initially but then the issue happens between the B and E strings.
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Old 01-10-2013, 01:31 PM   #6
mdc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dark Raven X
I think sweep is the term I'm looking for? Just got back into proper playing after that Rocksmith game got it's hooks into me. As fun as it is, it's practice modes leave a lot to be desired, namely in explaining how I should be positioning my hand to play this more complex stuff.

Say I gotta hit 9 notes in around a second; ie 14, 15, 17 on the G, then 14, 16, 17 on the B, 14, 15, 16 on the e, all as one fluid string of notes.

First thing; should I be trying to pluck each individual note? Going back to the game - it's not displaying these as hammer ons, but as regular notes so I'm guessing I should really be picking em all, but it's hard not to play em as triplets rather than one long sequence. Any advice for string switching while keeping a rhythm?

My other big problem is moving my index off the 14 on the low string up to the next before I'm due to hit that one; should I be moving my whole hand up at the end of the first 3 notes super quick, or do I need to have moved my index to the next string up as soon as I've hit it?

If you have to play those notes as 16ths, then because it's 3nps pattern it will play mind games with the brain.

The only way to get through that is to tap your foot and then internalize the 16th note time frame... then play the 3nps pattern.

The trick there is to not let your brain think it's playing triplets, but sixteenths. It's great rhythmic exercise in itself.

If you have to alternate pick all the notes at that speed, you will only need the lightest of touches with the fretting hand when fretting the note in order for it to sound.

That's something called "optimum tension".
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