Go Back   UG Community @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com > Music > Musician Talk
User Name  
Password
Search:

Reply
Old 01-12-2013, 09:39 PM   #1
zuhairreza
Registered User
 
zuhairreza's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
What scales should I begin to learn?

Hi!

I am self-taught and I've been playing electric guitar since April of 2009. Most of the time I love to listen to and play hard rock and heavy metal music, and bands I am into would include Metallica, Iron Maiden, Alter Bridge, Guns N' Roses, Scorpions, Accept, Kreator, Running Wild, etc etc. I never had any music class and thus my music theory knowledge consists only of bits and pieces I picked up along my guitar journey over these 3 or so years, and random tidbits which I taught myself sometime.

Anyway, I am very familiar with the basic blues and minor pentatonic scale patterns. Lately I've been trying to better my music theory knowledge, and specifically, learn a variety of other scales "formally" (as in, devoting a seperate practice time only to scale memorization and practice).

I am trying to do this in an organized/formal way, and sadly, I just have no clue at all what scale I should first begin learning in-depth. I think I need to know the scales needed most for the music I play, and also those "most used" in music in general, etc. Well, as I said already, I play hard rock, heavy metal, thrash metal, blues rock, and would love to play some alternative rock or maybe some jazz, etc.

Can anyone kindly make me a list which lists what scales I need to learn? A comprehensive list such as: the major scale, the minor scale, the pentatonic scale, etc. would be REALLY helpful, and I will focus on them from each time I practice guitar next time.

Also, how can I learn each scale shape in all different positions of the guitar fretboard? Is there any web-page, website or anything which can help me with this? From left and right I keep hearing knowing many scales will help me "make sense of " music theory later and "connect the dots". I want to know each scale shape in all different positions, and unfortunately, I have looked online a lot and have not found anything helpful.. yet.

Thank you please!!!!!!
__________________
Here's the link to my Youtube channel:

http://www.youtube.com/user/zuhairreza41

... and feel free to add me on Facebook if you're a musician at all:

https://www.facebook.com/zuhairreza1991

zuhairreza is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2013, 09:48 PM   #2
mdc
UG's Mr Chord Man
 
mdc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Just the major scale mate. musictheory.net
mdc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2013, 09:50 PM   #3
Thomas_Erak_Fan
Registered User
 
Thomas_Erak_Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by zuhairreza

Also, how can I learn each scale shape in all different positions of the guitar fretboard? Is there any web-page, website or anything which can help me with this? From left and right I keep hearing knowing many scales will help me "make sense of " music theory later and "connect the dots". I want to know each scale shape in all different positions, and unfortunately, I have looked online a lot and have not found anything helpful.. yet.

Have you tried this one?:

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php
__________________
"Because computers and science" - Rody Walker
Thomas_Erak_Fan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2013, 10:34 PM   #4
Swannie
drives a hearse
 
Swannie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: The Gates Of Dawn
The enigmatic scale. It's all you need.
__________________
"The man that hath no music in himself, nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils. The motions of his spirit are dull as night, and his affections dark as Erebus. Let no such man be trusted."
Swannie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2013, 10:46 PM   #5
mdc
UG's Mr Chord Man
 
mdc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swannie
The enigmatic scale. It's all you need.

Ya
mdc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2013, 10:56 PM   #6
sTx
Proud Autodidact
 
sTx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Oberlin, Ohio
First, learn all the notes on the fretboard, so that once you know how scales and chords work, you can wreak havoc all over the place. Biggest mistake I made was letting myself get 'boxed in'.
__________________
You simply MUST check out my music on

Reverbnation Downloads available here
Myspace Streaming Only


Especially for fans of Tool, APC, Avant-Garde, Ambient music, rock instrumentals, and fans of music in general. Will not disappoint.
sTx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2013, 11:12 PM   #7
KG6_Steven
Serving Knowledge
 
KG6_Steven's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Neither here nor there.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sTx
First, learn all the notes on the fretboard, so that once you know how scales and chords work, you can wreak havoc all over the place. Biggest mistake I made was letting myself get 'boxed in'.



Learning scales without learning the notes on the neck is pointless. Learn the notes on the neck of your guitar. It's what will set you free.
KG6_Steven is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2013, 01:16 AM   #8
Kromeo
Registered User
 
Kromeo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
I really don't have much to say, but I am just going to add that learning the harmonic minor scale will be a short-term release so to speak. Well, it was for me because of the augmented 2nd between the 6th and 7th scale degree.
Kromeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2013, 04:37 AM   #9
barbuzim1
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by sTx
First, learn all the notes on the fretboard, so that once you know how scales and chords work, you can wreak havoc all over the place. Biggest mistake I made was letting myself get 'boxed in'.


That could take you half your life.
yes knowing the notes could help but NO ONE plays 1/16 notes on 200 bpm while thinking C D Eb F F# G A B A Ab G etc...

try to add notes to you Pentatonic scale that you all ready know. between every two notes on the same string and after or before every note (but stay in a half tone or a tone distance from you original note) use your ears to judge if the scale you came up with is good.
barbuzim1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2013, 05:13 AM   #10
Morphogenesis26
UG Nerd
 
Morphogenesis26's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by sTx
First, learn all the notes on the fretboard, so that once you know how scales and chords work, you can wreak havoc all over the place. Biggest mistake I made was letting myself get 'boxed in'.


This. So much this.

I had learnt common scale shapes like the pentatonic, major, minor, and harmonic minor shapes early on and at the time it seemed really cool, like I was progressing as a musician. Well, it started to become a problem when all I could of was shapes and boxes to solo with, and I had also neglected other skills.

Something I heavily urge you to focus on is the notes themselves and the relationship they have with each other, along with a very important technique: Vibrato.
__________________
When life gets tough and you don't know what to do, then just keep






Morphogenesis26 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2013, 05:18 AM   #11
deltadaz
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Chromatic
Major
Minor
Harmonic min
Melodic min
Pentatonic Maj/Min
Blues

not just the shapes learn the theory along with these scales

The major is the most Important everything else is compared to it

for linking the scales together you want to look up the caged system
__________________
But this goes up to 11
deltadaz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2013, 05:41 AM   #12
losing battle
UG's Trollestia
 
losing battle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Stealing your underpants!
The major and minor scales, as for the minors understand the function of the scale as well.
__________________
BTMAM was never relevant
Quote:
Originally Posted by chookiecookie
@everything lb has ever said

Wtf is wrong with you

Quote:
Originally Posted by lolmnt
everypony calm down!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bladez22
numa, if I grow boobs and cat ears in the night, I'll let you know
losing battle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2013, 06:01 AM   #13
skilly1
Registered User
 
skilly1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by barbuzim1
That could take you half your life.
yes knowing the notes could help but NO ONE plays 1/16 notes on 200 bpm while thinking C D Eb F F# G A B A Ab G etc...

try to add notes to you Pentatonic scale that you all ready know. between every two notes on the same string and after or before every note (but stay in a half tone or a tone distance from you original note) use your ears to judge if the scale you came up with is good.


^ this + 1 and learn the major scale
Learning scales is definitely not pointless, it's the quickest place to start off and your ear and technique improves by practicing these
skilly1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2013, 06:04 AM   #14
rockingamer2
Larmarky Remark
 
rockingamer2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Rainy Northwest
Quote:
Originally Posted by barbuzim1
That could take you half your life.
yes knowing the notes could help but NO ONE plays 1/16 notes on 200 bpm while thinking C D Eb F F# G A B A Ab G etc...

Half a life? Really?
__________________
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^

"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity."

MUSIC THEORY LINK

SteamID: CarrionComfort
rockingamer2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2013, 06:22 AM   #15
20Tigers
1
 
20Tigers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Major scale. CAGED system.

(Learn the five root note shapes of each position. The five associated tonic chord shapes of each position. Then the rest of the notes that make up the rest of the major scale in each position. Learn the scale degree and note names as you do this. Then focus on learning I IV V in each of the five positions and then ii iii vi and viidim in each position. - end result is to know the notes up and down the fretboard, the scale degrees up and down the fretboard and where to find any chord anywhere on the fretboard.)
__________________
Si
20Tigers is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2013, 07:03 PM   #16
KG6_Steven
Serving Knowledge
 
KG6_Steven's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Neither here nor there.
Quote:
Originally Posted by barbuzim1
That could take you half your life.
yes knowing the notes could help but NO ONE plays 1/16 notes on 200 bpm while thinking C D Eb F F# G A B A Ab G etc...

try to add notes to you Pentatonic scale that you all ready know. between every two notes on the same string and after or before every note (but stay in a half tone or a tone distance from you original note) use your ears to judge if the scale you came up with is good.



I honestly fell out of my chair when I read that. Ok. No I didn't. Half a life? It only took me three months to memorize the notes on the neck. And that was accomplished using only 15 minutes out of my daily practice routine. Honestly dude, I think you missed the point.

Your hit and miss approach to embellishing the pentatonic scale is admirable, however it's a rather careless approach. Using that approach, notes that might work on some chords may not work on others.

Personally, I prefer knowing the notes on the neck, knowing my scales and knowing theory, so I can figure out if an out-of-scale note is going to work. I also prefer being able to tear it loose all over the neck, so I'm not stuck playing the same scale pattern all the time.
KG6_Steven is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2013, 02:14 AM   #17
91RG350
At least Microsoft cared
 
91RG350's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: NSW, Australia
Quote:
Originally Posted by KG6_Steven
..... It only took me three months to memorize the notes on the neck. And that was accomplished using only 15 minutes out of my daily practice routine....

Cool. How did you do it? TS could benefit from your experience.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlanHB
It's the same as all other harmony. Surround yourself with skulls and candles if it helps.
91RG350 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2013, 06:25 PM   #18
food1010
Bassist
 
food1010's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by barbuzim1
yes knowing the notes could help but NO ONE plays 1/16 notes on 200 bpm while thinking C D Eb F F# G A B A Ab G etc...
This reminds me of a Dizzy Gillespie (I think) quote. When asked what he thinks about when he plays, he responded simply by singing. Let me see if I can find the Hal Galper video where he talks about that.

The point is, you can't think in note names in real time. HOWEVER, you need to use the note names first to be able to internalize them. Well, maybe you don't NEED to, but it definitely makes it much more possible.

Edit: I found the video, and I really ****ed up the quote, I'm sorry.
__________________
Only play what you hear. If you donít hear anything, donít play anything.
-Chick Corea

Last edited by food1010 : 01-14-2013 at 06:56 PM.
food1010 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2013, 07:01 PM   #19
Hail
kill both bass players
 
Hail's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Dallas
Quote:
Originally Posted by barbuzim1
yes knowing the notes could help but NO ONE plays 1/16 notes on 200 bpm while thinking C D Eb F F# G A B A Ab G etc...


i don't play 16th notes at 200bpm in general unless i'm showing off my dickish bass-olo skills cause you sound like a tool and your shit stank
Hail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2013, 08:42 PM   #20
KG6_Steven
Serving Knowledge
 
KG6_Steven's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Neither here nor there.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 91RG350
Cool. How did you do it? TS could benefit from your experience.



Like I indicated... 15 minutes each night. It involves memorizing the intervallic relationships on the fretboard. For example, if you play the G at the third fret of the sixth string, there's another G two frets up on the third string, in other words, on the fifth fret of the third string. From there, the next G is on the eighth fret of the second string. Find all the notes of a given letter on all the strings. You can do a similar thing starting on the fifth string. Do this for A, B, C, up through G. This method is quite popular and works. Once you get to the point where you feel you know the notes, then you can start changing it around. Start at F, then do all the Ds, then all the Bs. Then start adding in sharps and flats. By this time, they should be fairly easy to find. Once you're getting really good, the next thing to do is to name the notes, while you're playing lead. Yes. You'll probably have to do this in your head, but if you can do it, then you're really making good progress.

This is the method I used. It works. It does take dedication, but if you stick with it, I guarantee results.
KG6_Steven is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:44 AM.

Forum Archives / About / Terms of Use / Advertise / Contact / Ultimate-Guitar.Com © 2014
Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.