Go Back   UG Community @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com > Instruments > Gear Building & Customizing
User Name  
Password
Search:

Reply
Old 02-14-2013, 07:25 AM   #1
fairytaleman
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
protective coating on a les paul

hello all,
I bought a gibson studio 50s tribute dark-back a while back.At first I was super excited playing it but something was off...I realised that the neck was quite sticky and was getting in the way of me playing smoothly.On top of that the body got a few dings from hits that shouldn't even affect the finsh.Comparing with my other les paul (epiphone standard) I found out that on my gibson les paul there wasn't any laquer coating(if you call it that).Went to a guitar store and the guy told me that it would cost me about 350 euros.Of course I don't want to give that kind of cash and I don't think that doing a 350euros work on a 700euros guitar is worth it.
So, first of all do you think that the amount of money is too much? (note that I live in Athens,Greece)
Could that work be done by me?Would it be hard and what kind of tools do I need?
If that work could be done by be, what kind of coating do I use and where do I get it from?
Could a poor done job affect my instrument in any other way than cosmetically(could it affect the sound of the guitar for example)?

Thanks for taking the time to read my post and I'll be thankful for any insight.
(sorry for my english, I'm not a native speaker...)
fairytaleman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2013, 07:39 AM   #2
Robbgnarly
Registered User
 
Robbgnarly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: NSB, FL
Epiphone uses polyester paints, Gibson uses Nitro based laquer

So the two guitars will feel very diffrent. The finnish is also very thin on the Gibson, so it will be much less durrable than the poly on your epiphone.

Leave your guitar alone, it will sound just fine a few dings will not change the tone.
__________________
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
Robbgnarly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2013, 08:39 AM   #3
fairytaleman
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
yeah i would agree but i greatly dislike the sticky feeling on the neck. it keeps me from playing as relaxed as i want
fairytaleman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2013, 12:21 PM   #4
kiaba94
******
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: the south
for that sticky feeling just mask off by the heel and up by the headstock and then get some 0000 steel wool and just lightly scuff the neck. it will make it satin feeling and since it is so fine it barely removes any finish.
kiaba94 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2013, 02:26 PM   #5
MG_Sora
UG's Industrial Designer
 
MG_Sora's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Flying In A Blue Dream
I'd suggest NOT doing the steel wool thing, in the short run it might help, but what you're doing is making micro scratches in the surface to make it feel like satin. In the long run, you'll end up filling those micro scratches with dirt and sweat from your hands.

That's exactly what causes the stickiness in my experience, so you can see why I don't like that.

I believe that Dunlop makes a product to clean the paint/wood on guitars. Use that and if you still fell like it is sticky try to use a polisher/buffer to get the neck to feel soft as new. It's not like it hasn't got a clear coat on it, it's probably just a wood sealant, so it's not like it's the bare wood.
__________________
Are You a PROG-HEAD? I'm NOT.
MG_Sora is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2013, 10:00 AM   #6
MrFlibble
Puts a bangin' donk on it
 
MrFlibble's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Salisbury, Wiltshire
You only do the steel wool thing to poly finishes. Nitro finishes lose their 'sticky' feeling after a few months of regular use (or less, depending on your skin, how you play and the environment the guitar is kept in).

It is really not smart to scuff, sand or in any way reduce the finish that is already on there, as it is already very thin.

As for the body finish, it's not supposed to have any kind of thick, high-gloss coat. The Tributes have a thinner and more matte coat than most Gibsons and even the glossiest Gibsons have a more matte and thinner finish than Epiphones. That's the whole point. A lot of the cost of a Gibson is in the time it takes to do those ultra-thin finishes. They're also why Gibsons tend to have a brighter and more responsive tone than Epiphones. You could shoot some gloss nitro over the top of it if you really want, but this won't protect the guitar any further, it will take months to do, it will be expensive and it will require stripping the guitar down to begin with.

Basically, Gibsons are not for people who want a flashy, thick, full-gloss finish and the dark tone that comes with that. That is the realm of Epiphone Elite/Elitist, PRS Singlecut/245 and ESP Eclipse CTM guitars. Half the point of a Gibson is the finish and the feel, tone and even smell of it.

Stick with it. In a couple of months it will no longer feel sticky and you won't care about dinging the top. Take a look at what happens to nitro finishes after ten years or so, a couple of dings now is nothing.
__________________
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
MrFlibble is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:36 AM.

Forum Archives / About / Terms of Use / Advertise / Contact / Ultimate-Guitar.Com © 2014
Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.