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Old 02-28-2013, 03:35 PM   #1
Ragdim
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Notation Question

Beginner player here with a quick question about the notation in the picture below. I want to know what the name of that notation is, and *more* importantly what frets are played for the circled item (this is the only piece of information I need to play this correctly).

Thanks in advance!
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Old 02-28-2013, 05:44 PM   #2
Artemis Entreri
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Really poorly done slash chords?
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Old 02-28-2013, 06:49 PM   #3
d1sturbed4eva
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I'm pretty sure you're playing the same chord (Em) but only play the strings the slash goes through.
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Old 02-28-2013, 11:24 PM   #4
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Well. the bottom staff is "guitar tablature", "tab for short.

The frets held relate to the numbers on the lines.

So, you'd be playing the E, A, & D strings of the guitar fretted @2 (The F# on the bottom E string turns the Em chord into an "add9" chord.

The note time values are the same as they would be on a regular staff. The numerical values of the fretted notes take the place of the note symbol on the standard staff.

The "V" symbol indicates an up stroke of the pick.

So, leading up to your red mark, you have two 1/8 notes as down strokes, and then a 1/16 note on the up stroke.

Last edited by Captaincranky : 02-28-2013 at 11:27 PM.
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Old 03-01-2013, 11:46 AM   #5
Ragdim
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Artemis Entreri
Really poorly done slash chords?

Is this actually a slash chord, though? Why didn't the musician just notate with a standard slash chord format like Em/F#? (this is just an example format, probably got the chords wrong somehow, though)

If these are indeed slash chords, then I'm assuming the tab numbers that I circled in the picture below are the bass notes? If so, why is there no bass note for the 3rd slash chord? (bear with me, I only just looked up slash chords on wikipedia)

Thanks a million, and have a good day ya'll.
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Old 03-01-2013, 02:29 PM   #6
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Because the bass note stays the same until the chord changes. You'll see in the 2nd part of the measure, the bass string fingering goes to "0, 0, 0".

The term "slash chord", applies to a different type of notation. "Slash chords" are usually indicated when you have just the song lyrics, with the chord symbols above them. Check out out tab section, and pull up a tab that is indexed as "chords, you'll see what I mean.

Most times they are giving you the chord "shape" (fingering).

A/A is fingered differently than A/C# (A/A the root note bass, would just be written A). That applies to a 5 string A major chord played from A-5 to e-1. If you play the bottom string, E-6, then it becomes a "slash chord" again, "A/E"

Oftentimes slash chords indicate a walking bass line. So: A/C#, A/B, A/A would basically walk the bass down from C# to A, while maintaining the basic A chord shape.

Last edited by Captaincranky : 03-01-2013 at 10:57 PM.
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Old 03-02-2013, 05:10 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Captaincranky
Because the bass note stays the same until the chord changes. You'll see in the 2nd part of the measure, the bass string fingering goes to "0, 0, 0".

Wouldn't it be bass "notes" then? Not trying to nitpick, just trying to be extra specific so I don't miss anything.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captaincranky
The term "slash chord", applies to a different type of notation. "Slash chords" are usually indicated when you have just the song lyrics, with the chord symbols above them. Check out out tab section, and pull up a tab that is indexed as "chords, you'll see what I mean.

Most times they are giving you the chord "shape" (fingering).


I think I got it (I checked out the tabs section). So in summary, these aren't slash chords?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captaincranky
A/A is fingered differently than A/C# (A/A the root note bass, would just be written A). That applies to a 5 string A major chord played from A-5 to e-1. If you play the bottom string, E-6, then it becomes a "slash chord" again, "A/E"

Oftentimes slash chords indicate a walking bass line. So: A/C#, A/B, A/A would basically walk the bass down from C# to A, while maintaining the basic A chord shape.

Not too sure about the top part, but the bit about "walk the bass down" makes sense.

Thanks for your time so far!
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Old 03-02-2013, 06:34 PM   #8
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If I were to write out the Em chord in your example in "slash chord format", it is indeed a "slash chord".

I'd write it thus. "Em/F#" or "Em with F# in the bass. The note to the right of the slash is ALWAYS a single bass note.

When I see this "A", I automatically assume, (correctly), that this is an A major chord, and that it has the "root", or 1st note as the lowest note in the bass. That would be an "A", and that's why the chord is called "A". If the lowest note ISN'T an "A", then it's a "slash chord".

"Tablature", in your example, doesn't require any such notation, because is telling you flat out, where to put your fingers. The 2nd fret of the E-6 string, (in standard tuning), is an F#. And so that technically makes it a "slash chord".

Tablature, is for people that either can't, or simply choose not to read music. (Not making a judgment). It also helps if you don't understand at what "position" a lead solo is being performed. In that capacity it enables a musician with more experience, point a beginner "in the right direction". So, there's no naming of notes involved in the system. All that's required is that the guitar's basic tuning be stated, and then it tells you where to put your fingers. Tab also gives you the chord "shapes" you'll be using.

Last edited by Captaincranky : 03-02-2013 at 06:38 PM.
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Old 03-02-2013, 06:39 PM   #9
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Wow this thread blew up and I never got an email. Slash chor was the wrong term I guess. What I meant to say was the type of notation where the chord is written above the staff and rhythmically laid out with "slashes" in the bars. The reason I said poorly done is that this isn't clear. And since no one seems to have figured it out, that's what I'm sticking with.
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Old 03-02-2013, 07:05 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Artemis Entreri
Wow this thread blew up and I never got an email. Slash chor was the wrong term I guess. What I meant to say was the type of notation where the chord is written above the staff and rhythmically laid out with "slashes" in the bars. The reason I said poorly done is that this isn't clear. And since no one seems to have figured it out, that's what I'm sticking with.
That was actually clear to me. What I see is a syncopated rhythm using shortened strokes. The stroke pattern is deliberately designed to avoid habit patterns. The upstroke across the bass notes is unusual to say the least. I couldn't exactly say that, as it would have confused the issue to the point of despair.

There's also perhaps a bit of a"cross picking" study going on,. (I think).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slash_chord

Last edited by Captaincranky : 03-03-2013 at 03:01 AM.
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Old 03-26-2013, 07:42 PM   #11
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Been a while since I posted. Regarding the last picture I posted, I'm still curious about the numbers I circled in red; what's the point of indicating those particular fret numbers?

(also as a complete aside, I was mistaking those as the bass notes before when they weren't even in the bass. This is relevant just for any confusion that might crop up)
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Old 03-28-2013, 11:26 PM   #12
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Guys, it's not an Em/F#...read the actual notation. The guitar's tabbed in Drop D
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Old 03-28-2013, 11:45 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XianXiuHong
Guys, it's not an Em/F#...read the actual notation. The guitar's tabbed in Drop D
So then you have to fret the 2nd fret on E-6 to produce an E on that string.

The drop D tuning taketh the E away, and your finger puteth it back.

This is Em in drop D

e-1 0
B-2 0
G-3 0
D-4 2
A-5 2
E-6 2 (0 in standard tuning).

I'm sure you know this, but that's just for the record.
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Old 03-29-2013, 01:08 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Captaincranky
So then you have to fret the 2nd fret on E-6 to produce an E on that string.

The drop D tuning taketh the E away, and your finger puteth it back.

This is Em in drop D

e-1 0
B-2 0
G-3 0
D-4 2
A-5 2
E-6 2 (0 in standard tuning).

I'm sure you know this, but that's just for the record.



This is correct.
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Old 04-01-2013, 08:34 PM   #15
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Old 04-01-2013, 08:44 PM   #16
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I mean, it's obviously someone who has no idea what they're doing...
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Old 04-01-2013, 10:54 PM   #17
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XianXiuHong is correct about the tuning being dropped D. Low E on the guitar is just below the 3rd auxiliary under the staff. That would place the D below that, (D2) on the 4th line under the staff, which it is.

The music shows a full chord on beat 1, first measure E minor, then a top line melody E, E, F#, E leading to the full 6 string D major chord.

As to what the shit and broken lines on the staff are, it appears they are pointing the the timing of the notes.

Right or wrong, that's my final guess. So Em chord, melody in between, D chord. The broken lines point the the timing of the melody.

If you need any more than for an answer or dispute it, please take up the topic in "Musician Talk" sub-forum.

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