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Old 03-03-2013, 06:05 PM   #1
JordanC97
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bass amp question

Found two amps, both by Laney, for very little money, but I can't seem to find anything about them on the internet.

The first one is a Laney RB3 65w. I've found one review and it seems to be okay, but I would like another opinion.

The second one is a Laney Linebacker 100w. There seems to be a head also called Laney Linebacker and that is the only thing I can find information on, nothing about the bass amp. Anyone with any knowledge of this, please help me!

I have a Westfield P-bass and I play pop punk like Blink 182 and Green Day. They don't need to be unbelievably loud, but I will be using it for band practice with drums and two guitars.

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Old 03-03-2013, 09:56 PM   #2
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If you're going to use it for band practice you want a powerful amp. If those are your only two choices I would go with the 100 watt.
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Old 03-03-2013, 10:01 PM   #3
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i'm not too sure on laneys reputation in the bass amp world, what sort of budget are you looking at?
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Old 03-03-2013, 10:40 PM   #4
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I've always liked Laney bass amps, but I can't speak for either of those two models.
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Old 03-04-2013, 04:52 AM   #5
Phil Starr
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There's a lot of old Laney stuff around which says their longevity must be OK. The best thing you can say about the sound is that it is very ordinary. The risk of either of these amps is tht they will struggle with a full band, even at rehearsal with the bigger of the two you will only just be powerful enough. Between 30W and 100W is a bit of a no-mans land for bass amps. Too loud for home practice and not enough for gigging and marginal for rehearsals depending upon the speakers. If you can find a little more and go for something like some second hand Peavey or similar then you won't need to upgrade so soon.

It's not a bad time to buy second-hand as a lot of gigging bassists are trading in high quality but heavy gear for smaller lightweight amps and cabs. 4x10's and 15's that sound great but are big and heavy can be picked up at real bargain prices.
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Old 03-04-2013, 01:52 PM   #6
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Phil, can't agree regarding too loud for home practice, all amps have a volume control.
If I do any home practice it's with my gigging amp and cab.
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Old 03-04-2013, 10:25 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Swift
Phil, can't agree regarding too loud for home practice, all amps have a volume control.
If I do any home practice it's with my gigging amp and cab.

I second this. My only amp (and therefore practice and stage amp) Is a Hartke HA3500 (guess what! yes, 350 watts) Through a GK MBE212 cab. And I can bedroompractice with it just fine.

As said above, you'll be pushing those 100W to get to the requiered volume. MAybe you can pull it off, maybe you don't, depends on how loud is your drummer and how big the other instruments' rig is. It's preferable to have 200+ watts, and if possible, a good cab.

I don't know anything about the linebacker, but the RB series is quite lacking on the low end side, and I found them thin sounding, no matter how you EQ it. Wouldn't recommend it, and least beign only 65watts.

What is your budget, you may be able to get something more powerful for your money!
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Old 03-04-2013, 10:49 PM   #8
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I used a Crate Amp for years, it was just fine even for being made over 15 years ago before I got it.

But the one I like at the store when I go play is the $300 "Acoustic" Bass Amps, they also work great for my guitar when I took mine in and the dude told me to try it on it. If it weren't for budget I would like to get a Fender Bass Combo Amp or a Ampeg half stack.
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Old 03-05-2013, 04:54 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Swift
Phil, can't agree regarding too loud for home practice, all amps have a volume control.
If I do any home practice it's with my gigging amp and cab.

OK I'll qualify this. Of course no amp is too loud. All I wanted to say was that you don't need 50-100W in your bedroom so paying the extra for something this size which you still can't gig with and which is going to struggle even at a full band rehearsal doesn't make much sense. Far better to spend a little more and get something you won't quickly need to upgrade.

It actually makes me a little cross that manufacturers and retailers sell things to inexperienced bassists that aren't really designed to carry out any useful purpose other than to fill a price point. They really are a waste of money and generally sold to people for whom money is tight who can't afford to get it wrong.

Just to make it clear, there are plenty of perfectly cheap and decent practice amps which don't take up a lot of space and which are capable of driving your family and the neighbours nuts. !5-20W is perfecxtly adequate for this. The next stage in amps, for most bassists is to be able to match a drummer. To do this comfortably you'll need 100W with loud (efficient) cabs and a bit more with ordinary ones. The only reason you'd buy a bass amp of 30-100W is if you are playing in a band which doesn't have a conventional drummer.

If anyone is interested they might want to read a bit more detail http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/colu...ng_it_loud.html
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Old 03-05-2013, 07:56 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Phil Starr
It actually makes me a little cross that manufacturers and retailers sell things to inexperienced bassists that aren't really designed to carry out any useful purpose other than to fill a price point. They really are a waste of money and generally sold to people for whom money is tight who can't afford to get it wrong.


You nailed it there spot on, I feel sorry for the beginners who fork out for something that in reality has no true end user functional purpose because at the end of the day they'll find that they need to go out and spend again if they want to gig
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Old 03-05-2013, 08:12 AM   #11
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I've done gigs for years on a 90W Behringer amp at school, I was playing with a 30 - 50 person concert band, and I used a 100W Roland Cube with a ~10 person jazz band. It really depends on what kind of bands you're playing with, and how big a venue/crowd. I'm an advocate of getting as much wattage as you can whilst sticking with a reliable brand/model until you reach the 250W-300W range, but 100W amps definitely have their place and usage in the market and it's not just to scam poor beginners into buying something they don't need.
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Old 03-05-2013, 02:05 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by chatterbox272
I've done gigs for years on a 90W Behringer amp at school, I was playing with a 30 - 50 person concert band, and I used a 100W Roland Cube with a ~10 person jazz band. It really depends on what kind of bands you're playing with, and how big a venue/crowd. I'm an advocate of getting as much wattage as you can whilst sticking with a reliable brand/model until you reach the 250W-300W range, but 100W amps definitely have their place and usage in the market and it's not just to scam poor beginners into buying something they don't need.


I don't think that is what was being said, It's the little Noddy amps with 8" speakers that manufacturers are claiming to be bass combos, they are as much use as a chocolate fireguard.
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Old 03-05-2013, 09:32 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Swift
I don't think that is what was being said, It's the little Noddy amps with 8" speakers that manufacturers are claiming to be bass combos, they are as much use as a chocolate fireguard.

I was getting the impression people were saying those little ones were okay to start practicing yourself at home, but the ones around 100W were useless because they were bigger than you need at home but too small to gig which just isn't true.
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Old 03-06-2013, 05:49 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by chatterbox272
I was getting the impression people were saying those little ones were okay to start practicing yourself at home, but the ones around 100W were useless because they were bigger than you need at home but too small to gig which just isn't true.

Since it was me who started this I'll clarify. A drummer with a full kit will routinely produce about 100-110dB. A budget 100W combo will produce about 104dB depending upon the exact model. Some produce less so 100W is marginal if you want to match a drummer and a bass combo run flat out all the time won't sound as good or last as long as one run well within its limits.

So, 100W is around the pivot point for anyone wanting to work with a drummer, would you want to have to buy a new amp because your drummer buys heavier sticks? Most of the people reading this will want to work in a band with drums. My criticism of amps below 100W is, I think, fair for the majority of bassists. Even amps around 100W are marginal and I think beginners need to be aware of that.

For me the 100W bass amp is a specialist piece of kit not a general tool. I'm not surprised someone has successfully used theirs for years but in things like jazz bands which aren't in the plans of most of our readers. I actually use a 120W Hartke kickback as my go to amp for its portability but I play a lot of acoustic stuff and my band are carrying a 2000W PA so I DI the bass. I also have a 600W Ashdown as backup for bigger gigs. Actually I bought the Hartke as backup but I'm old and money isn't as tight as it was so I can afford the specialist kit.

My criticism though was of the cheap 30-100W kit which is sold as beginners amps and at relatively low prices. They won't do the business for most of us and are a false economy. Unfortunately there are planty of salesmen who won't tell you that.

I don't really disagree at all with Chatterbox. The 100W amp will be OK for the uses he mentions and the 250W is where it gets comfortable the rest is all in my longer article.
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