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Old 03-22-2013, 09:29 AM   #21
cdhowell
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Originally Posted by Ignore
i just find his music too hectic, the constant energy, it wears me off, i find my favorite players to incorporate both, to me their solos sound more complete and well rounded and grounded, not as much overuse of lick playing.
By all he means he's a great guitar player but i dont quite get why people think he's the best the blues ever has been till now?
Is it a matter of taste or just less exposement, but how are the following not just on another level ?



I'm pretty sure for me it's just an issue of tastes. I tend to like the constant energy just because not many have that kind energy in their playing. B.B. King said that when he plays guitar it's almost like a conversation in that he'll play a lick, think it out or sing a lick then play a lick and carry his playing just like a conversation. Stevie Ray on the other hand is just kind wide open from start to finish and B.B. even stated that it didn't seem like he ever had to pause or anything, he could just keep going. And I think that's why I like SRV
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Old 03-22-2013, 10:11 AM   #22
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SRV took blues and brought it to a new level. He had housewives dancing to 'pride and joy'

Cant argue he's one of the best players to walk this earth. Utterly amazing licks and tone. I have no knocks on him. I dont love his music because I find it too predictable and frantic, and quite frankly the Texas shuffle blues is a little too white for my taste (Im a pasty white craker myself, just my preference). He's not the composer that some of the other guitar 'greats' are like Hendrix or Clapton or even Jimmy Page, BUT he played Voodoo Chile and Little Wing better than Jimi ever did, and I have been in love with Hendrix since I bought electric Ladyland on cassette and listened to it during detention in 10th grade (1988).

My cents anyway. The guy can play. If you like his stuff enjoy. There is no suberbowl for guitarists. If you have heard of them they do something right.
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Old 03-24-2013, 09:02 AM   #23
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I think my main gripe with him was that it seemed like there was no interplay with the band, it was just rhythm section backing him. I much prefer the types of blues where there is more interplay and improvisation between instruments. I like to see the musicians feeding off each other like you can hear in the Little Walter tunes and in lots of West Coast blues. Plus I can't say I enjoy his tone either.

In saying that though, he was a tasty tasty monster of a player and his versions of little wing, and his other tunes like riveria paradise and lenny are beautiful. He wrote some great tunes too, like Life By The Drop among others.
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Old 03-31-2013, 01:45 PM   #24
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thanks for the shares 'ignore,' loving the t-bone walker clip
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Old 04-02-2013, 07:54 AM   #25
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To me, Only BB King can match SRV talking about passion on stage and virtuosity.
im still kinda in awe since ive first heard Stevie Ray like five years ago. What I like the most is his tone which he achieved solely through his massive hands massively hitting massive strings, ive heard somewhere he would sometimes he would put a bass string on.
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Old 04-02-2013, 08:51 AM   #26
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What I like the most is his tone which he achieved solely through his massive hands massively hitting massive strings, ive heard somewhere he would sometimes he would put a bass string on.


This. The sheer note definition and "beefiness" for lack of a better word in his playing is what draws me into hero worship every time. It just looks and feels so natural to him, which is in essence, what the blues is all about. Feeling.

His version of Voodoo Chile is just mesmerizing
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Old 04-16-2013, 08:04 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by carmour1
I think my main gripe with him was that it seemed like there was no interplay with the band, it was just rhythm section backing him. I much prefer the types of blues where there is more interplay and improvisation between instruments. I like to see the musicians feeding off each other like you can hear in the Little Walter tunes and in lots of West Coast blues.


I guess you kind of have a point there but it is another cool thing about him that he didn't just hire some guys that were better when he took off. He turned down one or two really good offers to stay with his band members. He was a really humble guy. A blues great definitely, he's my inspiration. But the best? I think it would have been cool if I had been around to see Robert Johnson play...
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Old 04-16-2013, 09:32 AM   #28
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I guess you kind of have a point there but it is another cool thing about him that he didn't just hire some guys that were better when he took off. He turned down one or two really good offers to stay with his band members. He was a really humble guy. A blues great definitely, he's my inspiration. But the best? I think it would have been cool if I had been around to see Robert Johnson play...


I think you misunderstood. I'm not saying that his rhythm section was incapable of playing that kind of interactive/improvisational blues. I'm saying that it was a stylistic choice by SRV. I'm sure his band could've done it had he wanted it. They were actually great players who didn't overplay and had a great sense of rhythm. It's just SRV went for a specific sound where nothing else really got in the way of the guitar. It sounds egotistical but it was more about him than it was about a band sound
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Old 04-21-2013, 01:31 AM   #29
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I'll have to admit that I'm a bit old school...loving the sounds of Robert Johnson, John Lee Hooker, Lightnin' Hopkins and yes, as someone mentioned, T-Bone Walker as well and I've been A SRV fan for many years but Buddy Guy has been bringing a young fellow along that you have to hear to believe. He's just a kid, about 14 I think, and absolutely incredible. His name is Quinn Sullivan, he's all over you tube so shouldn't be hard to find. Give him a listen. You'll be glad you did...I promise.

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Old 04-21-2013, 08:34 AM   #30
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That guys amazing! He's a great singer too.
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Old 04-21-2013, 01:08 PM   #31
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Yes, he really is a very special talent and, to me, adds credence to the ambiguity of any sort of ranking list or 'best ever' title among blues guitarists. SRV would quite likely appear (or not) on most lists of favorites but I, for one, wouldn't relish the task of trying to put them into any sort of order because...well, because it's just not possible to do so.
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Old 04-22-2013, 06:38 AM   #32
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Yes, he really is a very special talent and, to me, adds credence to the ambiguity of any sort of ranking list or 'best ever' title among blues guitarists. SRV would quite likely appear (or not) on most lists of favorites but I, for one, wouldn't relish the task of trying to put them into any sort of order because...well, because it's just not possible to do so.


Agreed
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Old 04-22-2013, 06:41 AM   #33
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I set up my guitar with beefy strings, tuned down half a step, then a whole step. SRV must have had a death grip. I work on an assembly line and my hands and fingers are strong by my standards, but the bends he got out of such a heavy set-up is amazing to me. His tone was ridiculous.
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Old 04-22-2013, 09:51 AM   #34
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His name is Quinn Sullivan, he's all over you tube so shouldn't be hard to find. Give him a listen. You'll be glad you did...I promise.



I have a hard time taking him seriously. It's great to see a young cat playing and singing the blues but it's just not there for me
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Old 04-22-2013, 01:01 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by carmour1
I have a hard time taking him seriously. It's great to see a young cat playing and singing the blues but it's just not there for me
I'll go out on a limb here and take a wild assed guess...your list of favorites will very likely differ from mine...am I right? I'd venture an even wilder assumption that your list of favorites doesn't include Brent Mason. Mine does (check out Smokin' Section) and while he is mainly known and recognized as a country studio guitarist, he is a student of blues as well and, along with his drummer/guitarist brother Randy, is a more than accomplished blues musician. You'll find Albert Lee and James Burton on my list as well and again, while neither of these fellows are generally recognized as blues musicians, their respective styles are steeped in basic blues tradition and either can play the blues as well as anyone. Vince Gill is one that makes my list as well and still another not generally regarded as a blues musician but is one of those genre crossover types who can flat wail on a blues tune should the notion grab him. SRV is certainly on my list and now Quinn Sullivan is as well but once again, I'll hazard a guess (still out on that same limb) that my list could be a bit longer than yours.

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Old 04-23-2013, 01:49 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by HotDan!
I'll go out on a limb here and take a wild assed guess...your list of favorites will very likely differ from mine...am I right? I'd venture an even wilder assumption that your list of favorites doesn't include Brent Mason. Mine does (check out Smokin' Section) and while he is mainly known and recognized as a country studio guitarist, he is a student of blues as well and, along with his drummer/guitarist brother Randy, is a more than accomplished blues musician. You'll find Albert Lee and James Burton on my list as well and again, while neither of these fellows are generally recognized as blues musicians, their respective styles are steeped in basic blues tradition and either can play the blues as well as anyone. Vince Gill is one that makes my list as well and still another not generally regarded as a blues musician but is one of those genre crossover types who can flat wail on a blues tune should the notion grab him. SRV is certainly on my list and now Quinn Sullivan is as well but once again, I'll hazard a guess (still out on that same limb) that my list could be a bit longer than yours.


Our lists of favourites would surely differ, as would anyones. I love players like Danny Gatton and Brent Mason, i was just watching this clip

But when it comes to blues, I really am kind of a purist. I can appreciate guys like Brent Mason, Albert Lee, John Scofield etc playing their version of the blues, but it always sounds incredibly affected by their genre of expertise (be it country or jazz or what ever).

I would beg to differ that the names you mentioned couldn't play blues as well as someone like Hollywood Fats, Junior Watson, Anson Funderburgh, Jimmie Vaughan, Kid Andersen, Alex Schultz, or Igor Prado could. This is because the aforementioned guys dedicated so much time and effort to learning the tradition and musical history of the genre. They can play idiosyncratically in nearly any style of blues, but also each have their own unique sounds that make them originals.

Look.. I love a lot of guitar players. I draw influences from a tonne of guys from Roebuck staples to Django to Scotty More to Knopfler, to Tiny Grimes and Bill Jennings , T Bone Walkerm, Curtis mayfield, Cornell Dupree, Leo Nocentelli etc. I'm no genre nazi, I enjoy a wide range of stuff.

Brent Mason might be a student of the blues, but guys like Junior Watson are the real living masters.

I just think there's a big difference between wailign over a blues tune and actually playing THE BLUES.

Since when was this a dick measuring contest about who has the bigger list of influences? Maybe it means I am more discerning with my taste, but I don't think I'll ever hear better electric blues players than early B.B. King, Otis Rush, Jody Williams, Earl Hooker, Hollywood Fats, or T Bone Walker. Their shit is literally beyond compare.
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Old 04-24-2013, 01:17 PM   #37
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Well, I'll just say this. In it's most simple form, blues really only is governed by one 'rule' that defines its form. 12 bars, 4/4 time and flatted 3rd, 5th, and 7th. How that most simple 'rule' is interpreted and applied by a particular player determines what you get to listen to (yeah, I know, duh, right? Just thought I'd start with that).

From experience, I've come to believe that one truly cannot be 'kind of' a purist. Either you are or you are not. A true purist tends to be somewhat close minded and a bit uppity and snobbish in their opinions. I'll share a story that has a lot to do with the way I came to that belief. I attended a festival some years back and while wandering from venue to venue, I occasionally commented very similarly to the way you just did. An old gentleman who had been following along close to my group overheard some of my ramblings and said to me, "young feller (I was 50 something at the time and this old man looked to be nearly twice my age) there's nothing wrong with what you're saying but if you keep on thinking like that...you're missing out on a lot". Now...I've never claimed to be the sharpest pin in the cushion so it took some pondering on that simple statement for me to realize what it really meant. I'll not elaborate on what it came to mean to me because it could mean something entirely different to you.

Some folks will say that 16 bar blues is 'wrong'. Others will say that the only 'real blues' was produced during that golden period of the 20's, 30's and 40's. Still others say that the electric guitar ruined blues and that Texas Blues isn't real either. All of that and more is an ongoing argument and just a matter of perception about what is 'real', what is good. If you think it's good...then it is good. The same goes for players.

Earlier in this thread I made mention of a handful of players that I prefer (there's a lot more). I also mentioned just a few players that I appreciate (there's a lot more here too). That post was made a bit tongue-in-cheek and with a little sarcasm intended. I hoped that those of you who read it would get the same sort of chuckle out of it that I did while writing it. You could spend literally days going through the old albums, hearing riffs that later players lifted and made their own. There might not even have been an SRV (for example) if it weren't for Albert King, Buddy Guy, Taj Mahal, Big Bill Broonzy, Willie Dixon and so many others. If Stevie were alive today, he would very likely tell you the same thing. Blues music has become diluted in interpretation as well as it's presentation during its evolution over the past century and I've come to believe that that's not necessarily a bad thing.

If you were to take a look, you would find Clapton, Cray, SRV, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Guitar Shorty, Jack White, Johnny Winter as well as some of the players you mentioned among my music collection but right next to them is John Lee Hooker, Lightnin' Hopkins, Muddy Waters, Otis Rush, Magic Sam, Freddie King, James Cotton, Little Walter, Son House, Robert Johnson, Charlie Patton, Blind Willie Johnson and so on so I'm with you on that account.

I agree with everything you said with the exception that, taking into consideration the fact that, as you said, players are "... incredibly affected by their genre of expertise (be it country or jazz or what ever), I see (and hear) Mason, et al, playing their interpretation of blues with the same feeling and conviction as any of the players you named. I never meant a 'my thing is longer than yours' allegation, just noting that I've learned to expand my appreciation base. Oh and the Gill and Mason rendition of Liza Jane is great and I like it a lot but that's country rock not blues...it doesn't follow the 'rule'.

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Old 04-24-2013, 04:58 PM   #38
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[/quote]Well, I'll just say this. In it's most simple form, blues really only is governed by one 'rule' that defines its form. 12 bars, 4/4 time and flatted 3rd, 5th, and 7th. How that most simple 'rule' is interpreted and applied by a particular player determines what you get to listen to (yeah, I know, duh, right? Just thought I'd start with that).
[/quote]

I refuse to believe that this is all the blues is. Every other point at which we differ comes back down to this really.

I'm not quite sure what I'm supposed to do here. I give these new players a chance, I listen to a lot of their stuff but it just doesn't move me. Kenny Wayne Shepherd/Quinn/John Mayer/Joe Bonamassa etc just sound so canned. They are just nowhere on par with other modern blues artists like the late Sean Costello.

I don't really have much time for blues that starts and ends with hendrix and SRV. The well is deep.. draw from it.


PS: You should know by reading my comments that I realise that clip isn't blues, so either you're patronising me, or you're patronising me. :/
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Old 04-24-2013, 06:39 PM   #39
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I just said that that is what defines the blues form, not that that's all there is to it. I'll reiterate this: Some folks will say that 16 bar blues is 'wrong'. Others will say that the only 'real blues' was produced during that golden period of the 20's, 30's and 40's. Still others say that the electric guitar ruined blues and that Texas Blues isn't real either. All of that and more is an ongoing argument and just a matter of perception about what is 'real', what is good. If you think it's good...then it is good. The same goes for players.

You know...I don't think we're in much disagreement here at all. To me it seems that we're saying pretty much the same thing...just a little differently. Anyhow...the one thing that we definitely agree on is that SRV is probably not the best blues player who ever lived and that it is likely not possible to just arbitrarily name a player who is and that's what this thread was really all about in the beginning.

My comment pertaining to the clip was simply an observation and not intended to be the least bit condescending or patronizing although, after taking a second look at it, I can see how it could be construed as such. I'll offer an apology for that and I'll offer this as well. A discussion/argument about music is great fun, even on the net but a whole lot more fun over a pint at your favorite pub.

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Old 04-24-2013, 08:26 PM   #40
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Meh anyone who says 16 bar blues is wrong or that the only real blues was in the 20s/30s/40s or texas blues isnt real or electric guitar ruined blues are close minded idiots.

I just draw a distinction between Blues-Rock and Blues. They really seem like such different beasts.

Agreed on the pint @ the pub

if i had to pick a favourite blues guitarist it would probably be Hollywood Fats
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