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Old 03-27-2013, 06:26 PM   #1
tomc2
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Amp Noise Solutions

*Sorry for the vague title*

So a few months back I bought a Laney AOR head. The amp has an overdrive push/pull gain knob, that I never used. I set the amp clean and used a pedal for any dirt. But lately I was experimenting and I found an awesome tone with the built in OD. It sounded great, but I was getting a tone of hum, so I plugged in my Boss Noise Supressor, but I realized that it wasn't making a difference because of the noise coming from the amp, not my guitar. Anyone know of anyway I could fix the noise?
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Old 03-28-2013, 03:50 AM   #2
Goodtimes666
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you would put the noise suppressor in the effects loop.
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Old 03-28-2013, 08:10 PM   #3
coldandhomeless
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while putting it in the loop helps, the BEST possible way is this, the boss ns2 can be used before and after gain. guitr>ns2 input. ns2 SEND>front of amp. amp effects send>ns2 RETURN. ns2 output> amp effects loop return. set the threshold to about 2:00, decay at min. any boost pedals between ns2 and guitar. let me know how u like it. u can leave it on with clean and dirty both! label the jacks with tape, cause ull forget.
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Old 03-28-2013, 09:47 PM   #4
Cathbard
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Punch your amp firmly on top while it's on. Does it make a loud popping sound?
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Old 03-29-2013, 03:12 AM   #5
bowen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coldandhomeless
while putting it in the loop helps, the BEST possible way is this, the boss ns2 can be used before and after gain. guitr>ns2 input. ns2 SEND>front of amp. amp effects send>ns2 RETURN. ns2 output> amp effects loop return. set the threshold to about 2:00, decay at min. any boost pedals between ns2 and guitar. let me know how u like it. u can leave it on with clean and dirty both! label the jacks with tape, cause ull forget.

This. It is called the NS-2 X pattern. You can google image search it and find diagrams which may help explain it more clearly. Some people have gotten phase issues or found it to colour their tone too much, so try it out, and if you don't think it is for you at all then you don't risk buying too much equipment to find a result which you are not pleased with. The ISP G-String Decimator can do this function as a gate in front and a gate in the loop as well, however, the ISP will work in a much different way and might be to your taste.
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Old 03-29-2013, 11:23 AM   #6
coldandhomeless
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ya if it works, at most it will cut your hi end a tad. and volume slightly. phase issues def happen with a parallel loop, so make sure its series, i agree the decimator gstring is better, but both function similarly. if it works with the ns2, it will work with the isp better. less tone suck.
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Old 03-29-2013, 02:38 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coldandhomeless
ya if it works, at most it will cut your hi end a tad. and volume slightly. phase issues def happen with a parallel loop, so make sure its series, i agree the decimator gstring is better, but both function similarly. if it works with the ns2, it will work with the isp better. less tone suck.

The less tone suck notion is probably the case, but depending on what you are using it for. For high gain applications I have never noticed a drastic difference negatively affecting my tone in the X pattern, or in front of the amp. When I used this set up with a 6505+ I noticed that it not only helped cut out noise from the amp, but because the NS-2 is not true bypass and is a buffered pedal it sent a buffered signal to two separate parts of the amp.

So let me try to explain how the functions of the NS-2 X pattern and the ISP G-string Decimator actually function in quite different ways, and affect the amps sound/tone differently all while aiming for the same noise cancellation features.

In the case of a boosted amp, with an overdrive pedal engaged into the NS-2 Input, the NS-2 will send your guitars boosted signal to the front of the amp via the NS-2 Send. You would notice if you turned off the effects loop of your amp, that this kind of voids the noise suppressor in front and doesn't stop guitar noise totally. However, from the front of the amp goes into the pre-amp section of the amp, and then to the effects loop send which you send to the NS-2 Return, and out of the NS-2 Output back to the effects loop return.

So what is going on here is almost as if the NS-2 is sending two buffered signals to two separate parts of the amp. Both the front of the amp, and the effects loop return. Using an overdrive pedal as a boost, this is essentially sending your boosted guitar signal both to the pre-amp section and to the power-amp section without any pre-amp influence. With the NS-2 engaged this will gate noise from the guitar and from the amp itself, while sending two of the same buffered signal to two separate sections of the same amp. This is why doing this method seems to create a noticeable volume increase with high gain amps.

The ISP G-string works in a more linear fashion. It is designed specifically for being used in front and in the loop of the amp simultaneously, where as the send/return function of the NS-2 is designed to silence pedals in front of the amp, and was never engineered with gating two parts of the same amp at once. The G-string is true bypass, and is not buffered, so using this pedal it is not going to colour the tone of your amp like some people feel the NS-2 might. The G-string will gate your guitars signal, and will gate the noise created by the amp in the effects loop. This is done without sending two of the same buffered signal to two separate sections of the same amp, and in return remains true to the amps original sound and does not colour the tone.

So as a matter of tone suck, that is subjective to what set up you are using and what music you are playing and how good your ear is. The ISP won't do what the NS-2 does better, because the ISP G-string does not do what the NS-2 in the X pattern does at all. They function in two very separate ways, one being of two buffered signals from your guitar and the other operating in a linear function with no buffers.
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