Go Back   UG Community @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com > Music > Recordings
User Name  
Password
Search:

Reply
Old 04-01-2013, 12:23 PM   #1
backlash92
Registered User
 
backlash92's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Vocal and drum techniques?

So I've managed to record some guitar parts for a thrash metal song to a fairly decent sounding track. The problem now is that the original midi drums I was using before started sounding a bit gross compared to the guitar.

Right now I'm basically going into mixcraft 6 and importing midi drums that I made using guitar pro and the only thing I could think of is adding some slight reverb and compression in an attempt to make them sound a bit more realistic. I'm wondering if maybe someone has tips on how to make midi drums better, or possibly a vst kit that I could load into the software in order to up the quality.

I also plan on adding vocals to which the last time I recorded I only used a usb mic with slight reverb. Please refrain from recommending better mics as I'm not looking into how to get the best sound but rather the best sound with the equipment I have available. Thanks
backlash92 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 01:07 PM   #2
Zaqq
Registered User
 
Zaqq's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Use EZ Drummer or Superior Drummer instead of MIDI drums.
Zaqq is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 01:07 PM   #3
chaosmoon
Registered User
 
chaosmoon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
For the vocals, compression, EQ and reverb are the most common things todo. Fool around with those for a while to sculpt the sound that you are looking for.

For drums, if you have the money, I'd recommend Steven Slate Drums. Great sounding samples and easy to use. I don't know any free drum VSTs, though they are out there.

You can also download audio files of drum samples, then copy/paste them into Mixcraft. Pretty time-consuming and tedious, but it's free, and pretty good quality.
chaosmoon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 02:14 AM   #4
Mark1433
Registered User
 
Mark1433's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Turin
I don't know if it could help but I use Hydrogen. You have different libraries of drums and it's not difficult to understand, just take a look at the tutorial on their website and than start messing around. there's only one thing: For start just copy the drum tabs you find on UltimateGuitar and use them for your songs, it'll help you understanding better how Drums work and find out the right combination between all the instruments, ignore this last comment if you are already aware of such a thing. At the moment I don't have any idea about vocals

http://www.hydrogen-music.org/hcms/
__________________
My last.fm profile!

SoundCloud

MaЯk
Mark1433 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 02:54 AM   #5
chatterbox272
Registered User
 
chatterbox272's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Perth, Western Australia
There's 4 free options for decent sounding drums that I know of:
1. Drummix Beta: the free version of the Drummix software, the samples weren't from the best of kits so they released these ones free.
2. Pipeline Audio KMS Drums: fairly flexible, I haven't heard the samples since a very early beta so I can't really comment on the quality but it's an option.
3. Hydrogen: A standalone Drum Machine program. There's a huge library of samples (some good, some not so) and you can mix and match pieces of kit all you want. Only exports to a stereo track AFAIK though, so if you want multitracked drums then you need to solo a drum, bounce to WAV, then repeat for every drum (or combination of drums) you want.
4. ReaSamplOMatic5000: This will yield the best results if you have the time and patience to set it up. You need to go to google and find samples for the drums you want (just google "kick drum samples" or "snare drum samples") and set it up in the sampler. There's a guide somewhere here for doing this, and if you do set it up I would highly recommend saving it as a track template.
__________________
Masquerade: #19


Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael J. Caboose
Time isn't made out of lines, it is made out of circles. That is why clocks are round.
chatterbox272 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 08:12 AM   #6
DisarmGoliath
Disarms Goliaths
 
DisarmGoliath's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Birmingham, UK
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zaqq
Use EZ Drummer or Superior Drummer instead of MIDI drums.

Oh my.


TS, for free your best bet is to find decent samples online (for free) and trigger them via your DAW's Piano Roll (MIDI editor) with a sampler plug-in/insert. This will allow you more control and better samples than any freeware drum software I've heard.
__________________

Music Stuff

Facebook - Website - YouTube

DisarmGoliath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 04:15 PM   #7
billyjack654
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
I used to record everything with midi drum samples but not fully satisfied with the quality.
I use drum loops now. So much easier to use and sounds great. Just a matter of cutting and pasting really.
billyjack654 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 05:25 PM   #8
DisarmGoliath
Disarms Goliaths
 
DisarmGoliath's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Birmingham, UK
MIDI is not a sound. How many times do we have to say this on here, MIDI is not the sound! MIDI is the data (it's a computer language) used for computers or other MIDI devices to communicate with each other, and tell each other things like when to play a sample, how long for, how loud (velocity) and any modifiers (pitch bend etc.).

Using 'MIDI drums', the way I described, can only give you poor quality if you aren't capable of programming drums. The samples used are down to you, but there are thousands of free, high-quality drum samples (real recorded hits, not synthesised sounds) all over the internet.

Using 'drum loops' is a cop out used by people who are too lazy to program drums, or don't want to spend the time doing so (sometimes for legitimate reasons, e.g. to save time when demoing an idea) by using pre-recorded drum loops. Just like the quality of the individual samples, the quality of the drum loops vary hugely depending on where you get them and how they were recorded.


Anybody saying 'MIDI drums aren't good enough quality' or similar is simply talking absolute nonsense and doesn't know enough about the subject - sorry to cause any offence, but I'm really getting fed up of these sorts of responses popping up on here.


FOR THE LAST TIME - MIDI IS NOT A SOUND, IT IS A COMPUTER LANGUAGE
__________________

Music Stuff

Facebook - Website - YouTube

DisarmGoliath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 10:32 PM   #9
chatterbox272
Registered User
 
chatterbox272's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Quote:
Originally Posted by DisarmGoliath
MIDI is not a sound. How many times do we have to say this on here, MIDI is not the sound! MIDI is the data (it's a computer language) used for computers or other MIDI devices to communicate with each other, and tell each other things like when to play a sample, how long for, how loud (velocity) and any modifiers (pitch bend etc.).

Using 'MIDI drums', the way I described, can only give you poor quality if you aren't capable of programming drums. The samples used are down to you, but there are thousands of free, high-quality drum samples (real recorded hits, not synthesised sounds) all over the internet.

Using 'drum loops' is a cop out used by people who are too lazy to program drums, or don't want to spend the time doing so (sometimes for legitimate reasons, e.g. to save time when demoing an idea) by using pre-recorded drum loops. Just like the quality of the individual samples, the quality of the drum loops vary hugely depending on where you get them and how they were recorded.


Anybody saying 'MIDI drums aren't good enough quality' or similar is simply talking absolute nonsense and doesn't know enough about the subject - sorry to cause any offence, but I'm really getting fed up of these sorts of responses popping up on here.


FOR THE LAST TIME - MIDI IS NOT A SOUND, IT IS A COMPUTER LANGUAGE

Most of the time when people talk about MIDI sound, they're talking about the default sound that their soundcard produces when given MIDI data, which I agree isn't good enough quality for anything.
__________________
Masquerade: #19


Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael J. Caboose
Time isn't made out of lines, it is made out of circles. That is why clocks are round.
chatterbox272 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2013, 04:14 PM   #10
billyjack654
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Sorry to get you so defensive on the subject but I'm not a drummer and when it comes to great kits I'd rather leave that to the experts. I really don't know too much about midi drum kits but what I did hear I didn't like. I'm sure you know better.
billyjack654 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:44 AM.

Forum Archives / About / Terms of Use / Advertise / Contact / Ultimate-Guitar.Com © 2014
Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.