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Old 04-13-2013, 11:11 AM   #1
jacobmusicboy
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expanding baritone vocal range

Im a 19 year old singer im a baritone. my voice sounds somewhat like jeremy camp . f2 is the end of my low end and f4 the high end. i can hit an a4 using my head voice but it sounds trebly and really ugly . i really want to sing like myles kennedy and chris daughtry . i believe its all about the technique . and im sure the right technique doesnt involve strain .


what is that right technique? I read that myles kennedy uses bel canto technique and anotherthing i speak in a low tone does that affect my range? are high pitched notes supposed to sound loud while singing? i have dark deep voice and i love singing with a scratch in my voice i play guitar i write songs AND HIGH PITCHED parts of the song are the peaks

i really want to nail those notes . people like scott stapp and the skillet singer and james hetfield are baritones i believe but they also hit high notes in their songs how do they do it ? thats a lotta questions . i know .coz im serious about music and about improving . anyone with right knowledge kindly help me out
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Old 04-13-2013, 02:03 PM   #2
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Range expansion is a long process, and it isn't particularly rewarding. My range has expanded by one step in the past year of music school. You can improve the tone of your high register, though.

Make sure you are using enough air when you go for high notes, it's easier to hit them loud rather than soft. Be sure that you are breathing properly. Breathe from the bottom of your stomach, and your whole body should expand when you take a breath. Support all of your notes with a full air column. Stand up straight and avoid slumping so you don't have cramped lungs or a crooked air column.

Also, take a few lessons. They never hurt.

Also, strain is bad. Strain and tension will pinch your tone on any instrument or voice. Tension is never good.
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Old 04-13-2013, 05:07 PM   #3
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moved to singing &vocals subforum
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Old 04-13-2013, 05:12 PM   #4
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You're probably trapped in chest voice as most beginners. You need to find your head voice. It will actually be falsetto at first...weak, unsupported and breathy. Don't give up on it though, it's the tool to build a strong head voice. It's going to take a while though so you need patience. There are lots of videos or articles that can teach you about this.
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Old 04-20-2013, 06:50 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sethis
You're probably trapped in chest voice as most beginners. You need to find your head voice. It will actually be falsetto at first...weak, unsupported and breathy. Don't give up on it though, it's the tool to build a strong head voice. It's going to take a while though so you need patience. There are lots of videos or articles that can teach you about this.

F2-F4 is pretty standard baritone vocal range, with head voice. Head voice does not start out as falsetto, falsetto is a completely different vocal mechanism.

Anyways, Regardless of range expansion techniques, you're not going to sound like Myles Kennedy. His vocal timbre is completely different than that of a baritone, and it won't match up. Just work with what you've been given...as a leggiero tenor, I'd kill to be a baritone a lot of the time, there is SO much music that we just can't sing.

What will42 says is correct, on all accounts.
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Old 04-21-2013, 05:19 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Doveri
well if you have proper cord closure then you can obviously tune your tone/resonance to sound like different singers.

and for expanding your range, of course you can expand it. It's very complex thing to train that takes a long time, but my best simple advice, would be to sing with a bunny/nerdy/nosey voice whenever you sing anything.

Tyson2011, hah maybe it would be nice to be a baritone, but not if you have a low ass texture. I'm a baritone but I only had 1 octave of chest and the rest falsetto to begin with. took a long time to work closure through the whole range and tune my resonance.



its just a matter of getting over the passagio

Of course you "can" change your voice, musical theater people do it all the time. But for the best possible tone, he should focus on making his voice sound good, not trying to sound like a second rate version of someone else (I struggled with this for a LONG time, I started out in an 80's cover band and was constantly trying to match singers..it wasn't until starting training as an opera singer that I got over it)
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Old 04-27-2013, 11:42 AM   #7
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My 2 cents : try to consider your voice as ONE voice from lows to highs, and not focusing too much on the higher notes. Working on your low register is also helpfull to develop your range.
Then you have to find out about mixed voice (Thyroid Tilt), it will allow you to access your "head voice" without flipping into falsetto.
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Old 04-27-2013, 12:46 PM   #8
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F2-F4 is pretty standard baritone vocal range, with head voice

Sorry but, to my experience, that's all chest voice for a baritone. Now that I can get into my head voice, I can hit well into the octave above the F4 before using falsetto in the 5-6'th octave.

My voice used to have a G2-G4 range, which is pretty much the same baritone range, and now I have the ability to go from G2 to notes in the 6'th octave. It's all about training your voice, finding your head voice, and practicing to not strain.
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Old 05-02-2013, 12:13 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BloodReverence
F2-F4 is pretty standard baritone vocal range, with head voice

Sorry but, to my experience, that's all chest voice for a baritone. Now that I can get into my head voice, I can hit well into the octave above the F4 before using falsetto in the 5-6'th octave.

My voice used to have a G2-G4 range, which is pretty much the same baritone range, and now I have the ability to go from G2 to notes in the 6'th octave. It's all about training your voice, finding your head voice, and practicing to not strain.




that sounds interesting. Does that mean you are a baritone who can sing tenor also . Is your head voice powerful like the chest voice. Can you explain a bit more about your vocals and the techniques you use?
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Old 05-02-2013, 12:17 AM   #10
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Thank you all for your replies. This is a question that almost all the male singers have. So keep on posting , it will help other struggling baritones like me. haha .
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Old 05-02-2013, 02:40 AM   #11
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Basically, there's a point in your voice where it kind of "shifts gears". You have your lower chest voice and your higher head voice, but it's finding the way to connect them and mix them (mix voice) where you get your full voice out of.

I can't accurately describe how it feels other than, lower notes are felt in the chest resonating where high notes only resonate in your head.

Yes, the high notes are powerful like chest voice. Tenor's just have an easier time singing it. It's basically the difference between Russel Allen (Symphony X, extremely well-trained baritone) hitting his high notes vs Scott Barnes (In Fear and Faith, natural tenor with an average tenor range).
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Old 05-02-2013, 06:51 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BloodReverence
Basically, there's a point in your voice where it kind of "shifts gears". You have your lower chest voice and your higher head voice, but it's finding the way to connect them and mix them (mix voice) where you get your full voice out of.

I can't accurately describe how it feels other than, lower notes are felt in the chest resonating where high notes only resonate in your head.

Yes, the high notes are powerful like chest voice. Tenor's just have an easier time singing it. It's basically the difference between Russel Allen (Symphony X, extremely well-trained baritone) hitting his high notes vs Scott Barnes (In Fear and Faith, natural tenor with an average tenor range).


thanks mate

i recently discovered my head voice but it has a lot of treble in it. I can hit notes like b4 n c4 using head voice but i cant sing using it . The break happens at g4 ,at that moment im like 'should i switch to head or chest'. What im saying is my head voice has an ugly tone and its easily distinguishable when i shift from chest to head. Is their a way i can make them sound more chesty.

What do you think about belting. ?is it a good technique?

If i can hit those notes using my upper register then i can sing in it i guess . I think you can help me out with this.
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Old 05-02-2013, 02:14 PM   #13
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Any note you can hit in "falsetto" you can hit in a full voice, remember that. It'll take time and effort, but it is possible.

I'm not going to say that you should or shouldn't belt notes, just due to the fact that, without proper technique, belting can hurt. A lot.

My head voice was similar, one exercise you can do to help strengthen it is to start on a falsetto note and slowly transition it into your full voice. Mess around with your falsetto until you can get rid of the breathiness and put some body behind it.
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Old 05-02-2013, 05:18 PM   #14
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^Everything he said. Plus my favourite exercise is octave slides, very light at first. They really helped me but you gotta do LOTS of them. So don't get discouraged cause it may take from several months to a few years.
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Old 05-09-2013, 05:29 AM   #15
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"chest" and "head" are only resonance places. It's different from "full voice" and "falsetto" which are 2 different mechanisms.
To extend your range, you have to find out about "mixed voice" and "thyroid tilt". There are good explanations on the internet and youtube.
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Old 05-09-2013, 07:39 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BSaxby
"chest" and "head" are only resonance places. It's different from "full voice" and "falsetto" which are 2 different mechanisms.
To extend your range, you have to find out about "mixed voice" and "thyroid tilt". There are good explanations on the internet and youtube.


though it's important to note, a singer should always sing with their resonances and not get the idea that a full voice is supposed to be 'strong'. If a singer's resonance is light, so is their full voice.
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Old 05-10-2013, 04:49 AM   #17
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The fact is that one should consider is vocal range as ONE voice, feeling the buzz in the soft palate - mask, without overthinking about bridging.
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Old 05-11-2013, 08:59 AM   #18
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Your speaking voice resonates properly. yet when you yell at someone across the room it becomes a strain. see for yourself.

Learn to use your speaking voice incorporate that and become relaxed controlling it.
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Old 05-12-2013, 01:59 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by metalmetalhead
Your speaking voice resonates properly. yet when you yell at someone across the room it becomes a strain. see for yourself.

Learn to use your speaking voice incorporate that and become relaxed controlling it.


I dunno about you but I'm the opposite. I've blown my voice out more from talking than yelling, when i yell i end up using the same technique i use for screaming, diaphragm support, and it doesn't strain.
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Old 05-14-2013, 04:22 AM   #20
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for me too, speaking voice and singing are two different things
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