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Old 05-03-2013, 11:56 AM   #1
Deders
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How do you fix a slightly twisted neck?

Hi everyone, this is my first post here. I'm currently fixing up an Aria Pro II Magna Series guitar for a friend. I'd put up a picture but I need 15 posts before I can upload anything

I've had experience setting truss rods before but this guitar's neck seems to be twisted so that if I put my fingers on the 1st and 24th fret, there seems to be a little more space between the 7th fret and the low E string than there is with the high E string, indicating the truss rod or at least the neck is slightly warped.

We are using different strings for the setup, I believe he was using Ernie ball Slinky's, I suggested Skinny top Heavy Bottom (10-52) as he would mostly be playing in D and sometimes dropping the low D to C.

I've found that the heavier gauge has meant that we need to more tension springs for the Floyd Rose before I can actually tune the guitar but does anyone have any tips on getting the truss rod back in shape or do you think the strings will do that themselves once I adjust it to get a low action?
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Old 05-03-2013, 01:30 PM   #2
solidrane
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Clamps, clamps clamp the shit out of it, clamps all of the f***ing place. - only my experience with warped, twisted, and permabowed necks.

I assure you someone else will provide a more... Reasonable solution
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Old 05-03-2013, 01:52 PM   #3
SerpentineGtars
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Clamping?

At the very least (and providing it's only minimal warping/twisting), I'd pull the frets, plane the fretboard until its true again and then refret.

If it's bad, then you're looking at a new neck.
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Old 05-08-2013, 08:30 PM   #4
badkirk
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twisted neck is usually junk. just sayin'.
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Old 05-08-2013, 09:13 PM   #5
scguitarking927
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I saved this video from youtube incase I'd ever encounter something like this.

video

Easy little jig to rig up, all you need is a block of wood and a clamp.

It gets to the part about the "twist" after a minute or so.
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Old 05-09-2013, 09:26 AM   #6
Mars Rover
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The neck may be OK. You seem to be describing a slight disparity in the relief measurement of the low E compared to the high E. The bass side having more relief is common, likely due to higher string tension on the bass side. A slight difference here doesn’t necessarily indicate a neck twist. A slightly twisted neck does not necessarily force the use of an unacceptable amount of relief.

If you follow conventional relief logic, the heavier strings could use a bit more relief than the lighter ones. For example, you could set the truss rod for what you consider acceptable relief on the bass side and end up with a dead-straight neck on the treble side. The guitar may play great that way with little or no rattle. Or you could set the relief for the high E and end up a little more relief that you would like on the bass side but still the guitar may play just fine.

With an unfamiliar guitar, I set the neck nearly dead straight with just a barely detectable amount of relief on the high E – and the low E will usually end up with a bit more. Look at it as a straight neck with the least amount of relief as insurance against back bow, which is a bad thing. If it plays fine, I leave it. If there’s too much rattle that I can attribute to relief, I start adding some. Level frets are important and also when judging relief, try fretting at the 1st fret – and a high fret close to wherever the neck meets the body (instead of 1st and 24th).
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