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Old 05-09-2013, 01:39 PM   #1
OurRequiem
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reamping questions

I've been reading up on reamping guitar tracks because im trying to learn how to do it. Can someone explain the process for me? I understand you make a dry try and use an amp at the same time in there a spilt cord for doing that? And then when your doing the reamping process do you use an actual amp or a simulated amp? And finally what do you play the dry track through if you do use a real amp? Thanks I think it'd really help my recording quality out. Check out my band the wretched abyss on Facebook and listen to left for dead im looking for tips to make it better quality. Thanks!
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Old 05-09-2013, 02:10 PM   #2
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Reamping means just that...you are re amping the track. This can be done if you are on a tight budget and you can't afford to go to a studio and spend days/weeks getting the right guitar tone and the right amp/cab/mic/preamp etc setup.

So, you record a dry DI track (meaning it is just the signal coming from your guitar to your interface with no effects or amp sims or anything added. Then, you send that track out of your interface/mixer via a reamp box into the amp of your choice, or you can send those tracks out to people that will do it for you with amps you don't have.

You can "reamp" with amp sims, but it is a different process. You basically just insert the amp on to the track and that's it.

You don't have to use the amp at the same time, that is the whole point, the DI tracks offer you a safety net just in case you find later on that you ****ed up somewhere, you don't have to record all of the parts again, you just send the DI out to a new amp and that's it.
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Old 05-09-2013, 04:08 PM   #3
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Maggot pretty much nailed it. But if you do want to use an amp while collecting a DI track use a DI box. Personally I just create my DI with an amp sim, and then re-amp it back to my physical amp at a later time (allows me to record when the kids are sleeping with an amp sim)

One thing that I am unsure of, and have heard of, is acoustic coupling (I think that's the term). That is the interaction between the amp and the guitar (like feedback). The sound waves from the amp will interact with the strings while vibrating and can cause a different sound. If I could record that way with my amp at the right loudness I would do it that way, but as I said above I am usually not recording at a time I can have my amp at that level. I have also seen lots of videos of people playing guitar in the control room of studios, so I am unsure of how much it effects the sound, but just thought it was worth noting that its there.
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Old 05-09-2013, 04:19 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BeeScreamer
Maggot pretty much nailed it. But if you do want to use an amp while collecting a DI track use a DI box. Personally I just create my DI with an amp sim, and then re-amp it back to my physical amp at a later time (allows me to record when the kids are sleeping with an amp sim)

One thing that I am unsure of, and have heard of, is acoustic coupling (I think that's the term). That is the interaction between the amp and the guitar (like feedback). The sound waves from the amp will interact with the strings while vibrating and can cause a different sound. If I could record that way with my amp at the right loudness I would do it that way, but as I said above I am usually not recording at a time I can have my amp at that level. I have also seen lots of videos of people playing guitar in the control room of studios, so I am unsure of how much it effects the sound, but just thought it was worth noting that its there.


Good point. There are some things you can only do when you are either in the same room as the cab or are monitoring pretty loud in the control room. Or, if you wanted a totally exaggerated effect you could hold a pair of headphones that are blasting the amp signal over the neck of the guitar, it wouldn't sound too natural but hey, it's an effect.
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Old 05-09-2013, 04:41 PM   #5
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So in my situation is reamping even really worth it? im having a hard time seeing the benefit of reamping unless you have the DI track sent out and reamped through an amp you dont have. i have a bugera 333xl, recorded with a sm57 into a behriner 4 track mixer into reaper. i also have a line 6 pod but the preamps in that arent that great. should i just dial in the best tone i can and then forget about re amping? ive heard mixed suggestions on where the sweet spots are for the amp setting (like turn up the mids, and turn down bass and gain when recording) what are your suggestions/experiences? what if i layered a track from the 333xl and then reamped a Di track with a sim?
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Old 05-09-2013, 04:53 PM   #6
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Well, since you only have one amp/cab/mic combination you could just take your time to set up the best tone you can get and leave it as is. It wouldn't hurt to record DIs at the same time though, you never know when/if you might need them.

I have never used a 333XL before so I can't be of any help as far as that is concerned. But yea, just get a ballpark sound in the room then mess around with mic placement, preferably with headphones so you can hear what you are getting. Beyond that i'm afraid I can't help.

If you want to try using a real amp with an amp sim then go for it. You may have to try to get an impulse response from your cab/mic and use that with the sim though or it may sound weird. There are guides out there for that if you Google "how to make impulse response" or something.
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Old 05-10-2013, 07:44 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OurRequiem
So in my situation is reamping even really worth it?...ive heard mixed suggestions on where the sweet spots are for the amp setting (like turn up the mids, and turn down bass and gain when recording) what are your suggestions/experiences?


Well, if you reamp, you can spend all day moving the mic around and playing with your amp settings without having to play the guitar part all over again because you weren't sure whether or not you liked it.

If you have a clean DI track, you could play it back through the amp a whole bunch of times, and keep each track. Label them all according to mic position, like:
- 0.5" from grille, directly in front of cap
- as above with mids boosted to 6
-2" from grille, at edge of cone
- as above with gain at 4
-1" from grille, at edge of cone, off axis 45 degrees pointing towards cap
.... etc.....

Then you can compare the exact same performance across all thirty miking and tone variations to see what you like best - then delete the others.

That said, you can spend upwards to $400 on a good reamp kit. If you buy a Radial DI box and a Radial Reamp box, you're in it for about that.

I started with a Behringer DI box, which was both too noisy and deteriorated some of my signal going to the guitar amp when I tried to split it. I upgraded to the Radial J48 and it is way better. I picked up a DIY kit called "line2amp", which is a kit where you build your own reamp box. It was about $50 and works a treat.

CT
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Old 05-11-2013, 11:23 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by axemanchris
Well, if you reamp, you can spend all day moving the mic around and playing with your amp settings without having to play the guitar part all over again because you weren't sure whether or not you liked it.

If you have a clean DI track, you could play it back through the amp a whole bunch of times, and keep each track. Label them all according to mic position, like:
- 0.5" from grille, directly in front of cap
- as above with mids boosted to 6
-2" from grille, at edge of cone
- as above with gain at 4
-1" from grille, at edge of cone, off axis 45 degrees pointing towards cap
.... etc.....

Then you can compare the exact same performance across all thirty miking and tone variations to see what you like best - then delete the others.

That said, you can spend upwards to $400 on a good reamp kit. If you buy a Radial DI box and a Radial Reamp box, you're in it for about that.

I started with a Behringer DI box, which was both too noisy and deteriorated some of my signal going to the guitar amp when I tried to split it. I upgraded to the Radial J48 and it is way better. I picked up a DIY kit called "line2amp", which is a kit where you build your own reamp box. It was about $50 and works a treat.

CT


so im going to need a DI box? couldnt i just get a 1/4 to 1/8 inch cord and plug it into say a mp3 player or something of that nature and play it back like that or would that sound like shit?
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Old 05-12-2013, 09:02 AM   #9
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I'm not sure I'm getting what you're asking.

The 1/4" to 1/8" cord would go from what to what? What's the mp3 player for?

CT
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Old 05-12-2013, 09:10 AM   #10
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Gotta ask, do you even have an interface or a mixer?
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Old 05-15-2013, 03:50 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maggot9779
Gotta ask, do you even have an interface or a mixer?



no im just asking these questions for no reason. maybe you noticed the link? that goes to music i made? how do you think i was able to procure that?

whats the point of the DI box? does it do anything other than send a signal into the amp? if so couldnt you just take a mp3 player and play the track and have it in the amp using a 1/4 to 1/8 inch cord or would that for some reason sound like shit? because im not trying to spend a shit load of money reamping one song. ontop of that ive always considered finding the best tone in the amp to be the best way of going about it but since my tracks have been lacking something i thought id give it try. I dont even see the point of reamping unless your going to go through something that you dont have, or want to spend hours turning knobs on the amp you already have. so with that said ill be buying a celestion v30 loaded cab and ill try again, and playing with my amp, poor quality could be the shitty cab i have. so thanks or whatever i guess.
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Old 05-15-2013, 06:20 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by OurRequiem
no im just asking these questions for no reason. maybe you noticed the link? that goes to music i made? how do you think i was able to procure that?

lots of people use cheap techniques like running a 1/8" to 1/4" cable from their guitar to their computer line in. if you dont have the proper gear to send and recieve audio, this is not going to turn out well. its a valid question.
so you mention an berhinger mixer, how does that connect to your computer? because when you start talking about using an mp3 player, it sounds like you dont have the right I/O to get things in and out of your computer and DAW.


the way to do it is record a dry track first. you do not need to split the track and send to the amp. you just need an interface with an instrument input. save track, then move on to setup the following.

you need to send the output of your DAW to a line output on your interface.

the reason for a DI box after that (or preferably reamp box) is because the line output is not the same type of signal as a guitar. you are converting your output to the correct level. using line level will not sound right and will not work correctly.

the output of the reamp box (or backwards DI) is connected to your amp. you can now hit play on your DAW and your sound will come out of your amp.

setup another track in your DAW and record your microphone to that track. you hit record, and as the other track plays back it comes through your amp, the mic picks it up, and the second track records the new sound.


recording the dry track, exporting to an mp3 player and sending that signal to your amp will sound like crap. it suffers the same problem as not having the reamp box, you have the wrong level signal. you have also messed with the waveform as you exported, unless you use a completely lossless format. it is not going to get you the results you want.
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Old 05-15-2013, 06:38 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by OurRequiem
no im just asking these questions for no reason. maybe you noticed the link? that goes to music i made? how do you think i was able to procure that?


Well, when you ask about using an MP3 player to reamp I assume you don't care about quality or have a severely limited budget. I was just making sure
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Old 05-20-2013, 11:05 PM   #14
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When recording the dry track to software you want a di box to change the impedance of the signal. It's not 100% necessary, but it stops noise, and also provides the right levels [you have to be careful with volume coming in and out if you don't use di/reamp boxes.

Than when you reap, you want to put it through a reamp box to get the impedance back to what the amp input expects. Alternatively you can use a PASSIVE di box in reverse for this, but it won't be perfect.

Whilst neither are completely necessary, I'd say they are if you want a good quality recording. Scratch tracks can probs be done without [if you are careful and research it].

The advantage in reamping is it allows you to tweak the eq's, add and subtract effects and muck around with mic placement whilst the amp is playing [can also be done if you have a friend around lol]. And also you can use different amps and cabs and that kind of thing.

You can definitely use amp sims or software effects as well, but that's not usually referred to as reamping, as you only take the di signal, and don't output it back into a hardware amp.


It's only really worth it with the hardware [di and reamp boxes] imo.
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Old 05-21-2013, 12:58 AM   #15
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Considering how cheap DI boxes are these days, I can't think of many situations where you wouldn't want to ttrack a clean guitar signal as a form of insurance.


I find DI boxes on guitars particularly useful in three situations:

1) Live recording
Live and studio making are pretty different, so when you're doing live recording a DI gives you a safety net if the tones turn out to be crap. You can even place the DI box after their pedalboard to capture every element of the performance, or bofe the effects for maximum consistency.


2) The band turn up with crappy amps
A lot of the bands I work with are good players but turn up with awful gear....Marshall MGs, Line6 Spiders, Fender Frontmen etc.
If they know their stuff isn't great, just tell em you're taking a DI and they'll be glad of it.

However, there's sometimes kids who insist the fizzy shitfest is 'their sound' and want it recorded exactly as is. In those circumstances I'll stick a 57 in front of it for the look of the thing and ask them to plug into my 'special grounding box' to help the amp sound it's best. Then you quickly throw a good amp modelling VST on the track and when they listen back they'll be thrilled at 'how awesome their amp sounds'


3) The band change their mind after tracking
Record it with a big throaty JCM800 rock sound, and then halfway through mixdown the band realise the track would sound better with the smooth scooped tones of a Dual Rectumfrier? No problem.


Don't forget 'reamping' doesn't necessarily mean a real amp...it could just as easily be your favourite modelling preamp or VST plugin.

I'm aware that doesn't really apply to the OP but sod it, someone might my ramblings useful.
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