Go Back   UG Community @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com > Instruments > Bass Guitar
User Name  
Password
Search:

Reply
Old 05-09-2013, 01:41 PM   #1
dog_style
UG Senior Member
 
dog_style's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: the U.S. of A.
Question why do some basses have 22 frets, and not 24?

seems like 2 extra short (shorter than the rest) frets wouldn't be a problem on some basses. especially when there's extra fretboard for it.
dog_style is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2013, 02:06 PM   #2
Tostitos
Got Mead?
 
Tostitos's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: The Emerald City
Because that's just the way they're made. Some basses have 22 frets. Some have 19, or 20, or 21, or 24, or 26, or 36. Just depends on the bass and what players want/need.
__________________
Composite Aficionado

Spector and Markbass

DeviantART
Crevado
Tostitos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2013, 02:59 PM   #3
glass_satellite
bass player
 
glass_satellite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
what he said^

I've owned a 20 fret Fender and currently own a 24 fret Warwick.

I like having the two full octaves accessible per string, but that's jus me.
glass_satellite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2013, 03:15 PM   #4
Sudaka
Novice Bass Player
 
Sudaka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: ARGENTINA, papá!
I own a 22 fret Sterling!
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatalGear41
When you break a bass string, that snapping sound is the sound of six dollars going down the crapper.



Sterling Ray 35
Hartke Ha3500 head - Gallien Krueger 212MBE cab
Tech 21 VT Bass
Zoom b2
Sudaka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2013, 05:46 PM   #5
Zaqq
Registered User
 
Zaqq's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
I own a 24 fret Yamaha, because all Yamaha basses seem to have 24 frets. The same with Warwicks (if I'm not mistaken), because they both have pretty modern designs. Fender basses are more conservative and usually have 20 frets. But I don't see a reason for basses to have less than 24 frets. Yeah, you're really play past 20th fret, but 24 fret necks usually are more comfortable to play at frets 15-20.
Zaqq is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2013, 05:56 PM   #6
Hail
kill both bass players
 
Hail's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Dallas
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zaqq
I own a 24 fret Yamaha, because all Yamaha basses seem to have 24 frets. The same with Warwicks (if I'm not mistaken), because they both have pretty modern designs. Fender basses are more conservative and usually have 20 frets. But I don't see a reason for basses to have less than 24 frets. Yeah, you're really play past 20th fret, but 24 fret necks usually are more comfortable to play at frets 15-20.

bolt-on design stability
Hail is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2013, 08:48 PM   #7
Black Ox
Registered Abuser
 
Black Ox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
To annoy me mostly.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranglehold
RIP Dimebag, best bass player Megadeth ever had.

SIX GUN KID https://www.facebook.com/6gunkid
Black Ox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2013, 09:32 PM   #8
FatalGear41
Battle Beagle!
 
FatalGear41's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Saturn's Rings
Quote:
Originally Posted by dog_style
seems like 2 extra short (shorter than the rest) frets wouldn't be a problem on some basses. especially when there's extra fretboard for it.


A lot of it has to do with the fact that Leo Fender nailed the electric bass design on his first try. The Fender Precision bass, and its sibling the Jazz bass, remain the industry standards for electric bass design. The Precision had 20 frets, and most bassists seem to think that 20 is plenty on an electric bass. As a result, the many companies that produce mainly knock-offs and "modern" versions of Fender's designs do not stray far from the original specifications. Fender basses - and their imitators - account for the lion's share of the electric basses ever produced. Making a neck with additional frets means lengthening the neck pocket (or neck area within the body of the bass), whether bolt-on, set-neck or neck-through. Otherwise, the longer neck means a longer scale length, and Fender set the standard at 34" with the Precision and the Jazz basses. Fender threw an extra fret or two on the modern versions of the old classics only because they knew that a lot of guitarists were used to having at least 21 frets (Fender) or 22 frets (Gibson). It had some appeal to guitarists who switched to bass.

Other companies who sought to do something entirely different - Alembic was the first - took an entirely new look at the electric bass. They made basses with more frets because they were not constrained by having to remain true to the Fender design specifications. Some of them threw extra frets onto their basses simply because Fender did not offer them. When you are designing a bass from scratch, you don't have to adhere to established specifications. The result is that a lot of "non-Fender looking" basses have 22, 24 or even 26 frets (i.e., the Warwick Vampyre NT).

Most people don't clamor for more frets on a bass because the overwhelming majority of bass playing does not reach into that range on the neck. Once you pass the 12th fret, you're in the guitar's territory. Virtuoso soloists make great use of those higher frets, but that's about it.

Leo Fender got it right the first time. Why don't more basses have 24 frets? Because if it ain't broke; don't fix it!

That's essentially why.
__________________
"It's only Rock and Roll until someone loses an eye!"

Quote:
Originally Posted by gregs1020
FatalGear41 knows the ways of the obscure. I hear it's just not with Gibsons. Beware, Halloween approaches...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaz91
DAMNIT FATALGEAR YOU RUINED MUH FLOW!

Last edited by FatalGear41 : 05-09-2013 at 09:34 PM.
FatalGear41 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2013, 03:01 PM   #9
dog_style
UG Senior Member
 
dog_style's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: the U.S. of A.
it's all getting more and more clear.
dog_style is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2013, 04:40 PM   #10
MaggaraMarine
Slapping the bass.
 
MaggaraMarine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Finland
I don't think so many bassists need 24 frets. My Thunderbird has 20 frets and it's enough for me. And when you play on the higher frets, it doesn't really sound like bass any more. There's pretty much no use for them if you are not soloing.

But really why not 30 frets? Or 40 frets?

Also my guitar has 22 frets and I don't need 24 frets on my guitar either. I have found out that I can't play guitars that have 24 frets. I get lost on the fretboard, there are too many frets. Yeah, I'm just used to having 22 frets and I don't need any higher frets.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Charvel So Cal
Ibanez Blazer
Digitech RP355
MXR Micro Chorus
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Hartke HyDrive 210c
MaggaraMarine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2013, 06:29 PM   #11
FatalGear41
Battle Beagle!
 
FatalGear41's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Saturn's Rings
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggaraMarine
But really why not 30 frets? Or 40 frets?


Try the Zon Hyperbass. Three-octave length neck; completely fretless! Bring on the microtonal madness!
__________________
"It's only Rock and Roll until someone loses an eye!"

Quote:
Originally Posted by gregs1020
FatalGear41 knows the ways of the obscure. I hear it's just not with Gibsons. Beware, Halloween approaches...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaz91
DAMNIT FATALGEAR YOU RUINED MUH FLOW!
FatalGear41 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2013, 06:14 PM   #12
dog_style
UG Senior Member
 
dog_style's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: the U.S. of A.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggaraMarine
I don't think so many bassists need 24 frets. My Thunderbird has 20 frets and it's enough for me. And when you play on the higher frets, it doesn't really sound like bass any more. There's pretty much no use for them if you are not soloing.

But really why not 30 frets? Or 40 frets?

Also my guitar has 22 frets and I don't need 24 frets on my guitar either. I have found out that I can't play guitars that have 24 frets. I get lost on the fretboard, there are too many frets. Yeah, I'm just used to having 22 frets and I don't need any higher frets.

i say 24 to complete two full octaves on one string since it's so close anyway.

i made not need them 2 extra frets, but i would play them because so many other people don't or won't.
dog_style is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2013, 06:17 PM   #13
dog_style
UG Senior Member
 
dog_style's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: the U.S. of A.
there could be just 12 frets, or maybe even 6.

but who would be into such a change? especially with 6 frets.
dog_style is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2013, 06:22 PM   #14
Hail
kill both bass players
 
Hail's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Dallas
Quote:
Originally Posted by dog_style
there could be just 12 frets, or maybe even 6.

but who would be into such a change? especially with 6 frets.


not really, unless you intend on a) having a lot of dead space on the fretboard or b) having multiple tones between each fretspace so it's a fretted/fretless hybrid

string tension is everything with bass.
Hail is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2013, 06:35 PM   #15
dog_style
UG Senior Member
 
dog_style's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: the U.S. of A.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hail
not really, unless you intend on a) having a lot of dead space on the fretboard or b) having multiple tones between each fretspace so it's a fretted/fretless hybrid

string tension is everything with bass.


6 frets would be a much shorter neck.

interesting observation you made though.
thanks.
dog_style is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2013, 07:18 PM   #16
Hail
kill both bass players
 
Hail's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Dallas
Quote:
Originally Posted by dog_style
6 frets would be a much shorter neck.

interesting observation you made though.
thanks.


would it just be the 18th-24th fret? think really hard about this now
Hail is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2013, 08:34 PM   #17
T00DEEPBLUE
Edits posts like a boss
 
T00DEEPBLUE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: The Dungeons
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatalGear41
Making a neck with additional frets means lengthening the neck pocket (or neck area within the body of the bass), whether bolt-on, set-neck or neck-through.

Fingerboard extensions allow for necks with more frets without a larger neck pocket.
__________________
Whoever reads this in Snape's voice gives 10 points to Slytherin.

(´・ω・`)
T00DEEPBLUE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2013, 10:08 PM   #18
FatalGear41
Battle Beagle!
 
FatalGear41's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Saturn's Rings
Quote:
Originally Posted by T00DEEPBLUE
Fingerboard extensions allow for necks with more frets without a larger neck pocket.


Those things are dodgy enough on a guitar, so I imagine they would be even more fragile and prone to cracking on a bass (bigger strings, greater neck tension, stronger vibrations, larger frets, etc.). They also negate the possibility of a "slab-style" fretboard. I would not trust one on a bass. I've seen too many of them break on "Strat-style" replacement necks.
__________________
"It's only Rock and Roll until someone loses an eye!"

Quote:
Originally Posted by gregs1020
FatalGear41 knows the ways of the obscure. I hear it's just not with Gibsons. Beware, Halloween approaches...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaz91
DAMNIT FATALGEAR YOU RUINED MUH FLOW!
FatalGear41 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2013, 05:08 AM   #19
MaggaraMarine
Slapping the bass.
 
MaggaraMarine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Finland
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hail
would it just be the 18th-24th fret? think really hard about this now

Not necessarily if you had some extra thick strings.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Charvel So Cal
Ibanez Blazer
Digitech RP355
MXR Micro Chorus
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Hartke HyDrive 210c
MaggaraMarine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2013, 10:00 AM   #20
T00DEEPBLUE
Edits posts like a boss
 
T00DEEPBLUE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: The Dungeons
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatalGear41
Those things are dodgy enough on a guitar, so I imagine they would be even more fragile and prone to cracking on a bass (bigger strings, greater neck tension, stronger vibrations, larger frets, etc.). They also negate the possibility of a "slab-style" fretboard. I would not trust one on a bass. I've seen too many of them break on "Strat-style" replacement necks.

I don't see why. The fingerboard extension is not under load past the point of the neck block as the neck block is where the load is taken.
__________________
Whoever reads this in Snape's voice gives 10 points to Slytherin.

(´・ω・`)
T00DEEPBLUE is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:18 PM.

Forum Archives / About / Terms of Use / Advertise / Contact / Ultimate-Guitar.Com © 2014
Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.