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Old 06-14-2013, 09:23 AM   #1
vaggelas96
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exercises for bass

Hello i want to ask you if you know where i can find exercises to increase my accuracy and my speed on bass guitar
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Old 06-14-2013, 09:24 AM   #2
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or any easy songs to play!!!
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Old 06-14-2013, 09:43 AM   #3
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Speed is a by product of accuracy. I have a few suggestions:



Stu Hamm's entire fretboard "fitness" is out there on Youtube. (I also didn't know Stu had ink!)

http://www.amazon.com/Bass-Fitness-...r/dp/0793502489. Joasquin De Pres' book is excellent for what you are looking for.

Spider Scales (dozens of youtube vids out there)

For songs--check out the thread at the top of the forum page.
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Old 06-14-2013, 11:00 AM   #4
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you know i got 1 week that i got my bass and i have learned to play ac dc tnt.I learned iron man and unforgiven riff but some parts are too fast for me because i am totaly begginer and i can t do lessons with a teacher.So is there any easy song to recommend me???
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Old 06-14-2013, 02:23 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vaggelas96
Hello i want to ask you if you know where i can find exercises to increase my accuracy and my speed on bass guitar

Spider scales.

Code:
|---41------52------63------------ |--3--2----4--3----5--4----------- |-2----3--3----4--4----5---------- |1------42------53------6--------- (etc)


The perfect exercise. Good for finger strength, speed, accuracy, finger-per-fret, etc. Just don't overdo it.

Learn your modes. They are the basis of everything you'll ever play.
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Old 06-14-2013, 06:26 PM   #6
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Chromatic exercises with a metronome are probably the best way to build speed. Scalar and Modal exercises with a metronome are the best way to build accuracy. Start off at a reasonable speed and work your way up. It is as boring as hell, but it works.
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Old 06-16-2013, 06:31 AM   #7
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Do you want to be a professional bassist?

If not, just play some songs. Pick a song which is slightly out of your comfort zone (known as the learning zone), practice the passages slowly and accurately at first and then speed them up until you can play at speed. An exercise is just a passage.

If you want to speed up your octaves, find some songs with some fast octaves in. Likewise, if you'd like to practice chromatic runs then find some songs with them in. You will enjoy your practice a lot more and, as I said, unless you want to be a professional bassist then it should always be fun.

The way to get better is to simply play, play, play. It will come.
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Old 06-16-2013, 06:56 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaz91
Learn your major and minor keys. They are the basis of everything you'll ever play.


Fixed.
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Last edited by Sickz : 06-16-2013 at 06:28 PM.
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Old 06-16-2013, 03:19 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaz91
Learn your modes. They are the basis of everything you'll ever play.


this is literally the most wrong thing i've ever read on this entire site. do you kiss your mother with that mouth?
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Old 06-16-2013, 03:32 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sickz
Unsuccessful Fix.


Fixed.
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Old 06-16-2013, 03:39 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ziphoblat
Fixed.


Care to elaborate?

95% of all music out there uses regular major or minor keys, i am genuinely interested in knowing how that's not a fix from "you should learn modes".
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Old 06-16-2013, 04:08 PM   #12
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i daresay anything outside of church music, art music, and a few choice tunes from modal jazz is going to deviate from tonality.

even if you were to consider modes as their own method of analyzation, they remain a subset of tonality and are as such obsolete outside of a context wherein we can apply modality as a convention rather than a misinterpretation of the tonic, accidentals, and the consonance/dissonance relationship over a given passage or series of passages.

this is why i don't like to leave MT

Last edited by Hail : 06-16-2013 at 04:11 PM.
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Old 06-16-2013, 05:02 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sickz
Care to elaborate?

95% of all music out there uses regular major or minor keys, i am genuinely interested in knowing how that's not a fix from "you should learn modes".


"Out there."

Wonderful. And 97.567% of all statistics are made up on the spot.

I dare-say that the majority of music "out there" probably doesn't even use heptatonic scales. Perhaps the majority of music you listen to does, but then how is that even remotely relevant?

Ultimately, major/minor are just modes, and if you're going to take the time to understand both of them (when, at least in my experience, in the majority of pop/rock etc minor is vastly more common than major) you may as well put in the little bit of extra effort required to grasp modes as a whole.
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Old 06-16-2013, 06:01 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ziphoblat
Ultimately, major/minor are just modes, and if you're going to take the time to understand both of them (when, at least in my experience, in the majority of pop/rock etc minor is vastly more common than major) you may as well put in the little bit of extra effort required to grasp modes as a whole.


please tell me you don't think the major and minor modes are the same as the church modes
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Old 06-16-2013, 06:26 PM   #15
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Lol this is bass forum and people are arguing about modes. Way to go UG.

But yeah. Why is everybody always saying that modes are important? You are understanding modes wrong. I think people are talking about scale shapes when they refer to modes.

Major and minor are keys! Dorian and mixolydian for example aren't keys like major and minor are.

And why do people always say "practice scales blablabla"? Scales aren't the most important thing in music. And I don't think scales should be the first thing to learn. Because then all you do is practice your scales with metronome and don't spend any time on actual music. I didn't practice scales until recently because I started taking lessons and my teacher showed me some scales. Though I already understood what scales were (and maybe that's why I didn't want to spend too much time playing them up and down). But I never really practiced them.

Learn the fretboard would be better advice. It won't get MT regulars mad.
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Old 06-16-2013, 06:27 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ziphoblat
"Out there."

Wonderful. And 97.567% of all statistics are made up on the spot.

I dare-say that the majority of music "out there" probably doesn't even use heptatonic scales. Perhaps the majority of music you listen to does, but then how is that even remotely relevant?

Ultimately, major/minor are just modes, and if you're going to take the time to understand both of them (when, at least in my experience, in the majority of pop/rock etc minor is vastly more common than major) you may as well put in the little bit of extra effort required to grasp modes as a whole.


I'm going to be honest and say that i made up that statistic on the spot only to prove a point, cause i know that the majority of music music can be put as either being major or minor. And that is not based on my music taste as you said, i'm very much a bebop guy as well as a fusion guy.

I changed that because, as said, almost all music is based on major or minor keys and scales. Hell, a lot of jazz is just major or minor with accidentals. There is very little "true" modal music out there. And if he needs to get familiar with anything, it's major and minor, cause he might never ever use Lydian or Locrian for example, cause that is advanced stuff.

The statement "Modes are the basis of everything you'll ever play" is wrong. Major and minor keys are the basis of everything you'll ever play is more correct.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hail
please tell me you don't think the major and minor modes are the same as the church modes


Also this.
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Old 06-16-2013, 07:13 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sickz
I'm going to be honest and say that i made up that statistic on the spot only to prove a point, cause i know that the majority of music music can be put as either being major or minor.


Again, what are you basing that on? Nobody has a record of all the music there is or ever was. What about microtonal music, for example?

Quote:
The statement "Modes are the basis of everything you'll ever play" is wrong. Major and minor keys are the basis of everything you'll ever play is more correct.


Which are divided further into modes, a simple understanding of which can provide an easy perspective from which to add variety to what you're playing, regardless of whether or not their typical applications in popular music technically fit all the criteria laid out by "advanced" music "theory".
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Old 06-16-2013, 08:06 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ziphoblat
Again, what are you basing that on? Nobody has a record of all the music there is or ever was. What about microtonal music, for example?


i assure you anybody who's at a level to analyze music beyond western conventions and develop a taste for microtonality, polytonality, or music legitimately built off of modality, atonality, serialism, schillinger method, et al ad nauseum isn't going to be asking for some exercises to make their bass technique a little tighter.


Quote:
Which are divided further into modes,

wrong
Quote:
a simple understanding of which can provide an easy perspective from which to add variety to what you're playing,

no, that's intervals, tension, resolution, and accidentals you're thinking of
Quote:
regardless of whether or not their typical applications in popular music technically fit all the criteria laid out by "advanced" music "theory".

if you want to listen to music with static harmony, go for it, but the reason modes aren't in popular music is because they're bland, boring, and are too unstable to experiment with. they're far more restrictive than anything implied by "advanced music theory" (which is simply a study of relationships)

modes as you seem to think they exist are nothing better than exotic scales with exotic names, and if you're at a playing level where a set of notes you read about on the internet can still encapsulate your approach to a piece, you're probably not in a position to be giving anybody advice about their musical education.
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Old 06-16-2013, 08:21 PM   #19
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Oh gods, why do I even bother sometimes.

If you learn the major, melodic minor and harmonic minor modes then you are are also learning all the chords that can fit into any key, giving you better ability to write and improvise. A key is not a specific series of notes, it is a selection of notes and each key encompasses every single mode.

To say that music just uses major and minor scales keys is entirely wrong as they are modes themselves, ionian and aeolian. Besides, dorian and mixolydian are just as common.

Last edited by Spaz91 : 06-16-2013 at 11:29 PM.
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Old 06-16-2013, 09:21 PM   #20
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wait do you know the difference between a scale and a key because i really don't think you do

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaz91
A key is not a specific series of notes, it is a selection of notes and each key encompasses every single mode.


because this is very wrong. all a key signifies is the point of resolution. "In the key of E major" does not mean the piece is using the E major scale. it means that the passage within the key resolves to E major. no more, no less. you are describing a scale, which is a series of notes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaz91
To say that music just uses major and minor scales is entirely wrong as they are modes themselves, ionian and aeolian. Besides, dorian and mixolydian are just as common.


this is also very wrong for a few reasons. the first being that ionian and aeolian are built off of a specific series of conventions similarly to the other modes, alienating them from their counterpart in modern tonal music. however, due to our understanding of cadence in modern music, by default the major or minor will replace the ionian and aeolian in function even in examples wherein the ionian or aeolian are used (unless expressly considered by the composer as an experiment within modality that would bring it into a grey area of intention, i guess)

you're thinking of modal scales rather than what modes actually are, and even in that case modal scales are of very limited use once you know what an accidental is - opening up the option, theoretically, of at any given time utilizing any of the 12 given notes over any piece to some degree, and producing, by your logic, thousands of modes.

TS, learn your chord construction, tension, resolution, and where those tie into intervals and you'll be more than equipped to handle anything that can be thrown at you in a practical setting. modes are just a buzzword that are drastically overprioritized. run up and down your scales and exercises for finger dexterity, but don't worry about using them for everything you're doing because they're little more than a very, very small part of your arsenal in real life usage.
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