Go Back   UG Community @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com > Music > Musician Talk
User Name  
Password
Search:

Reply
Old 06-26-2013, 12:27 AM   #1
Unreal T
Registered User
 
Unreal T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Song Forms

I am trying to understand forms of song better. When I try to understand them I get so locked into definitions. I know there are many forms but doesn't it just come down to the melody structure and the way the phrases are constructed? I think of all music as a story and there are many ways to tell a story with music so whatever has been told and sounded good to most peoples ears they came up with names of parts of the songs such as verse chorus bridge etc.

I do not know much about older music such as baroque or classical but I am sure it comes down to the same thing?
Unreal T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2013, 05:01 PM   #2
will42
UG's bassoon-master
 
will42's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
I'm not entirely sure what you are asking, but I'll try. The traditional Italian Song Form is generally a two-reprise ternary, which goes [:A:][:BA:], but that's not really what you're asking, I think. Classical music and pop music (pop is metal and blues and rock and jazz) don't really share the same forms.

Are you asking why forms came about, or what they are?
__________________
Strauss!
"I am hitting my head against the walls, but the walls are giving way." - Gustav Mahler.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AeolianWolf
absolutely what will said

Yay, my first compliment!
will42 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2013, 07:30 PM   #3
Unreal T
Registered User
 
Unreal T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
I am trying to figure out what elements of music characterizes different song forms and what elements of music are the most important/common in defining sections of the song.

In popular music what are they? Like if you took 100 different bands from different genres and compared their verses choruses bridges intros etc. are there any elements of music that they all have in common to define each section.

Last edited by Unreal T : 06-26-2013 at 07:33 PM.
Unreal T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2013, 07:35 PM   #4
HeretiK538
Petrol
 
HeretiK538's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Leicestershire, UK
In pop music (and metal and rock and whatever) there's the very common intro-verse-prechorus-chorus-verse-prechorus-chorus-solo-chorus-outro format. Most-all rock songs you'll ever hear will be a variation on that. You don't necessarily need a prechorus (sometimes called a bridge), it depends on you and the song

Edit: This isn't a steadfast rule, but often, a verse will be a fairly low-key, quiet affair, which then builds up through the prechorus into a big, loud, catchy chorus. So I figure, if your chorus isn't catchy, you might want to try and find a way to make it that way, certainly for pop music. Again, not a steadfast rule, and the more you write, the more you'll work out what works for you. Hope that helps!
__________________
Rotten Playground
Listen to me and Jameh muck about on a podcast
as if you have anything better to do.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Reverend_Taco
Grass stains on my dicks

Quote:
Originally Posted by T00DEEPBLUE
Pfft. Gay? Nah, gay is the manliest sex that exists.

Last edited by HeretiK538 : 06-26-2013 at 07:37 PM.
HeretiK538 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2013, 07:47 PM   #5
Unreal T
Registered User
 
Unreal T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Yeah I just think of if as a story to tell. Like from start to finish because that is all what music is even in its most complex forms going back years and years ago to classical , baroque etc. There are tried and true ways to make it sound a certain way but in the end you can do whatever you want with it if you understand how to manipulate the elements of music very well.
Unreal T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2013, 08:10 PM   #6
Fallenoath
My minds playin' tricks
 
Fallenoath's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Centralia WA
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeretiK538
In pop music (and metal and rock and whatever) there's the very common intro-verse-prechorus-chorus-verse-prechorus-chorus-solo-chorus-outro format. Most-all rock songs you'll ever hear will be a variation on that. You don't necessarily need a prechorus (sometimes called a bridge), it depends on you and the song

Edit: This isn't a steadfast rule, but often, a verse will be a fairly low-key, quiet affair, which then builds up through the prechorus into a big, loud, catchy chorus. So I figure, if your chorus isn't catchy, you might want to try and find a way to make it that way, certainly for pop music. Again, not a steadfast rule, and the more you write, the more you'll work out what works for you. Hope that helps!



Nice avatar. =)

On a side note Ive been wondering what OP is too just haven't asked it. Mostly,because I didn't know how to word it.
__________________
Just another Sheep in the design of the Almighty Machine.


-GEAR-
Gibson 60s Les Paul Tribute
1999 Ibanez RG470 (MIJ)
Peavey 6505+
Egnater Tweaker 15 (Yeah, I tweak)
Fallenoath is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:24 AM.

Forum Archives / About / Terms of Use / Advertise / Contact / Ultimate-Guitar.Com © 2014
Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.