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Old 06-27-2013, 08:57 AM   #1
Sickz
Jazz Musician
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
In need of advice.

Hey everyone.

So i have a question, i don't know if it's at all possible to do this, but i think it is. But to make sure i thought i'd run it by you guys here, cause many of you have more experience with singing than me.

Alright so very brief background on my singing. I started singing about one year ago, since i am going to highschool studying music you get to choose two instruments you get private lessons in. First year i chose guitar since i am mainly a guitarist/bass player, and then the second year (last year) i chose singing.

Now i have improved A LOT since i started, my range has improved and so has my tone. My teacher has been really good and taught me proper technique from the start so i got a relaxed jaw and neck and all that, as well as good breathing. (By "good" here i mean "okay" obviously, since i have only been singing for about a year)

Anyway, now to the question. During this summer i have been working on my singing on my own, keeping in mind not to tense up and such stuff. But i've found for much of the music i want to sing i am just a tiny bit to low at the moment. I can get up to a good E (Top space on a G clef), but when i get up to the F i start feeling a tad strain on my voice, the F# is where my voice cracks and the G is only available in falsetto.

Now is there any way to improve this so i could one day reach that G and maybe beyond with a voice that is more "fuller" than falsetto. I don't mean i want a trick to be able to sing higher, i want to do it properly, i am just asking if you think it's manageable for a baritone singer to sing higher without using that thin falsetto sound. Cause i am really trying to get to the point where i can sing stuff like Metallica, in other words, hard rock/heavy metal clean vocals (Well cleanish, some gutter in them).

Thanks for taking the time to read my post, any suggestions are helpful!
Thanks in advance.
Sickz
__________________
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote:
Originally Posted by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
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Old 06-27-2013, 05:00 PM   #2
Sethis
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Join Date: Dec 2011
Yes of course, it's totally possible. In fact, most singers (yes, even tenors) have trouble somewhere around these notes when they are untrained. They just sound constricted and bad in general at first. In fact, that's one reason why many inexperienced tenors think they are baritones. Any note that you can hit in falsetto, you can learn to hit in a fuller voice. But it will probably take a while, at least 2-3 years would be a realistic goal imo.
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Old 06-28-2013, 06:26 AM   #3
Sickz
Jazz Musician
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Great! Thanks for the response!

Is there anything in particular i should do to improve or just continue with what i am doing? Which is warming up with your normal exercises (Scale runs, arpeggios, intervalls, articulation etc) and then just practicing and learning songs within my current range.
__________________
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote:
Originally Posted by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
Sickz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2013, 04:25 PM   #4
Sethis
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
To be honest, I learned how to sing mostly by singing songs that were challenging for my level, not too easy and not too hard, while always checking that I apply correct technique. The exercises that helped me the most though were sirens ,over an octave or less too, that I gradually used to go over my comfortable range. The transcending tone is also good where you start a note in falsetto and transition to full voice. But really there is no single way in becoming a good singer, whatever works for you. Since you have a teacher you already have someone to guide you. And to be precise, when I said at least 2-3 years I didn't mean that you need that much time to just hit the notes, I'm talking about really mastering them and being able to sing them just as relaxed and easy as you do with your lower notes. That takes time.

Last edited by Sethis : 06-28-2013 at 04:29 PM.
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