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Old 08-16-2013, 03:07 PM   #21
crazysam23_Atax
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Suggestion:
Learn EGBDF and FACE, then slow down and figure out the notes on the staff for some simple songs. For example, pick up sheet music for "Mary Had a Little Lamb". It's a simple tune, which means it won't be as hard to figure out as something complex. Pick up several songs like that and keep reading until you can look at those songs and sight read them without having to stop and figure out what to do. Then, move on to harder songs and so on.

There is no quick secret to this. You have to work at it. Music has no shortcuts; you have to do the work to learn things properly.
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Old 08-16-2013, 03:53 PM   #22
eric_wearing
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Every Good Boy Does Fine and FACE are simple enough. As for the simplicity thing, I shall take that and run heh. Thanks.

I'll be back to this post once I'm able to do intermediate stuff and talk about that :P
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DBKGUITAR
To be a good lead guitar you must be VERY GOOD AT RYTHM

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggaraMarine
My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!
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Old 08-16-2013, 04:01 PM   #23
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Well written sheet music will at least give you a clue where you should play a chord.

Assume you have an uninverted G major chord written out, G(3), B(4), D(4).

That can't be played in the open position of a guitar, because the B & the D, are on the same string. You can play it at the 3rd position with this fingering, D-4, 5th fret, G-3, 4th fret, & B-2, 3rd fret.

So, the way a chord is written on the staff, is also a rough equivalent of a tab, once you know the names of the notes written on the staff, and the names of the notes that make up any given chord. After that, it's just about interpolating the two factors, practice, and a bunch of memorization..
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Old 08-16-2013, 06:14 PM   #24
crazysam23_Atax
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eric_wearing
Every Good Boy Does Fine and FACE are simple enough. As for the simplicity thing, I shall take that and run heh. Thanks.

I'll be back to this post once I'm able to do intermediate stuff and talk about that :P

Keep in mind that a lot of it is about finding the most comfortable fingering. For instance, there's a lot of spots I can play an E note (assume I mean an E(4), which is the E is EGBDF). But you have to find the most comfortable fingering for you to be able to not only play that E, but the notes before and after it. Make sense?
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Old 08-16-2013, 07:11 PM   #25
eric_wearing
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yeah. When I was playing Mary Had a Lil Lambda (haha) I figured it out pretty quick. I saw the G on the main staff and the first E above it so it kinda gave me a reference point only problem so far is the octave names/# and the key signature but even then I'm starting to learn the Circle of Fifths :P
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Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

Quote:
Originally Posted by DBKGUITAR
To be a good lead guitar you must be VERY GOOD AT RYTHM

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggaraMarine
My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!
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Old 08-16-2013, 07:54 PM   #26
Captaincranky
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eric_wearing
....[ ]......only problem so far is the octave names/# and the key signature ...[ ]....
The octave names (rather "octave numbers"), are best learned on a piano keyboard diagram, with the numbers in place. They are especially useful when discussing vocal ranges. Anyhoo, "middle C", is "C4", and the number changes on each "A". A piano has 88 keys and therefore spans approximately 8 octaves.

Key signatures are "best" (IMO) memorized using a system of remembering which key comes next in the "add a sharp or add a flat sequence". C, all natural, G 1 sharp F#, D 2 sharps, F# + C#, A 3 sharps, F3, C#, + G# and so forth. You just build the next key adding sharps (or flats) the the ones you already have.

This helps to play melody on the guitar in different keys, without actually changing position.
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Old 08-17-2013, 02:17 AM   #27
eric_wearing
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That actually helps a lot. I thought the # would change on the C as per the rest of general music. Thanks
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Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

Quote:
Originally Posted by DBKGUITAR
To be a good lead guitar you must be VERY GOOD AT RYTHM

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggaraMarine
My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!
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Old 08-18-2013, 05:41 AM   #28
Hupio
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android app

I wrote an Android app with the aim of helping guitarists learn to sight read.

Here's a link

***AlanHB edit removed advertising details*****

Let me know what you think.

Last edited by Hupio : 08-18-2013 at 05:44 AM. Reason: can't post links
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Old 08-19-2013, 03:16 AM   #29
eric_wearing
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hupio
I wrote an Android app with the aim of helping guitarists learn to sight read.

Here's a link

***AlanHB edit removed advertising details*****

Let me know what you think.


I'm still gonna keep going the way I'm going (I just found an old hymn book and that's VERY useful) but pm me the site so i can check it
__________________
Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

Quote:
Originally Posted by DBKGUITAR
To be a good lead guitar you must be VERY GOOD AT RYTHM

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggaraMarine
My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!
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Old 08-19-2013, 09:43 AM   #30
Virgman
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Obtain Levitt's "Modern Method For Guitar".

Start at the first lesson and work through Volume 1. Step by step you will learn to sight read.

It's excellent. I've never seen a better method for learning to sight read on the guitar.

Learning to sight read is like learning to read books. You begin with very simple books and progess over time.
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Old 08-19-2013, 03:52 PM   #31
mdc
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Read backwards from the last bar.... but read each bar forwards. This will develop your eye movement rapidly, because you'll notice that you have to jump from the END of the bar to the START of the PREVIOUS bar. So always look ahead.

Try articulating notes, like string bending. This is a really good one because you actually have to fret the WRONG note due to having to bend up to the correct note.

With basic reading exercises there is not likely to be any articulation or expression marks, so feel free to add your own. Very useful if you have a simple chart to read at a gig.

Last edited by mdc : 08-19-2013 at 03:53 PM.
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Old 01-23-2014, 09:04 AM   #32
bigfootedfred
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CelestialGuitar
I'd say the best way to sightread is to first look at the key signature. If you can identify what key the piece is in, then sightreading is just a matter of looking out for accidentals and identifying intervals. You should be able to tell what each interval looks like, so you know how to move from the note that you're on. What string to play each note on shouldn't be a problem, as it'll be fairly self explanatory when you're actually playing through the piece. I actually learned sightreading from singing, as I study Opera and Musical Theatre, and with that, it's about knowing how to go from the note you're currently on to the next note, you'll know how to sing each interval, so when you put what you know together with what you see, you can quite easily get a grasp of what the piece requires. That same principal can easily apply to guitar, and, in fact, it's so much easier to do it on a guitar, as it's a visual instrument, you can see all of these intervals you'll need to play, and it'll be so much easier. Really, you shouldn't be reading note by note, it'll make things far too difficult, and will make faster and more complicated passages impossible.


ive only recently started to learn sight reading after all these years its been so much easier since reasiling just what you said its very good advice to anyone reading, justkinda think up and down. using all FIVE didgts on your fret hand also helps so much. i started doing that early with as i liked war of the worlds as a kid. but kinda wrong also. for me anyway.your hand will strech and your mind will get used to more fingers :-)
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Last edited by bigfootedfred : 01-23-2014 at 09:16 AM.
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