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Old 08-13-2013, 09:07 PM   #1
eric_wearing
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Practicing rhythm

So as most guitarists my age and skill (18 and 3 years) I been putting off rhythm. I'm looking to remedying this though and I was wondering will Punk music will help me control rhythm?
My favorite band is Rise Against and the lead guitar is pretty easy for me to grasp. But when I tried bass or rhythm guitar (which was the craziest rhythm I ever had to try compared to metal and regular rock stuff I cover) I was so outta my element that I was embarrassed to call myself a guitarist-in-training. Anyway my question's up there in bold so yeah, there ya go.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DBKGUITAR
To be a good lead guitar you must be VERY GOOD AT RYTHM

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Originally Posted by MaggaraMarine
My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!
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Old 08-13-2013, 09:15 PM   #2
Banjocal
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Slow it down. Take it easy, use a metronome. You can, providing it isn't early punk with the anti-music aesthetic, which might throw you off at times, but getting used to different playing styles and rhythms is great practice. As I said, take it slowly. Walk before you can run, as frustrating as it is to have to do that.

Look up a few lessons on here and on the Youtubes. Plenty around to keep you going. And don't be embarrassed: being a musician is all about learning. Even the greats learn something new every time they play. Might not be quite so big a revelation, but they're always learning something about their instrument.
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Old 08-13-2013, 11:07 PM   #3
DystoCreativity
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Heh, if Rise Against's rhythm is tricky, I suggest trying to tackle some Math Rock, if you're feeling masochistic.

Joking aside, just play along with a metronome (it become your best friend while developing your rhythm) - start slow and steady, and move on as you figure it out. Rhythm comes easier to some than to others, but it still comes to all if you just take your time.

And eventually, perhaps you will be tackling the absurd rhythms and time signatures of Math Rock.

Oh, and I suppose Youtube may be able to help, as well.
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Old 08-14-2013, 01:35 AM   #4
eric_wearing
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^^^Ik it was a joke but I suck at all punk music cos the rhythm is all fast and even when I move my power chord as fast as Yngwie playing Dragonfarce, my right hand goes all deflated lol. Never been able to play Blood Red White & Blue for that simple fact haha my future as a mathmusician is not forseeable lol

Anyway, maybe I'll try the most basic of basic math rock....though I don't even understand triplets just yet heh. Anyone wanna explain triplets? I'd google but this site seems to give better answers.
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Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

Quote:
Originally Posted by DBKGUITAR
To be a good lead guitar you must be VERY GOOD AT RYTHM

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggaraMarine
My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!
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Old 08-14-2013, 04:55 AM   #5
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Have u looked in the sticky on in the techniques section?
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Old 08-14-2013, 05:55 AM   #6
MaggaraMarine
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My guitar teacher told me to only practice upstrokes. That's usually your weak point. When you practice upstrokes, your downstrokes get better too because you always have to move your pick up between the downstrokes (even if you are only doing downstrokes, obviously). So try playing only upstrokes and see how good you are at it. For me (and most guitarists I think) it's a lot harder to play upstrokes than downstrokes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eric_wearing
^^^Ik it was a joke but I suck at all punk music cos the rhythm is all fast and even when I move my power chord as fast as Yngwie playing Dragonfarce, my right hand goes all deflated lol. Never been able to play Blood Red White & Blue for that simple fact haha my future as a mathmusician is not forseeable lol

Anyway, maybe I'll try the most basic of basic math rock....though I don't even understand triplets just yet heh. Anyone wanna explain triplets? I'd google but this site seems to give better answers.


Triplets... So the idea with triplets is that you play three equally long notes at the time of one note. The basic triplet is an 8th triplet. If you are playing in 4/4 and want to play 8th triplets, there would be 12 equally long notes in a bar.
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Old 08-15-2013, 12:53 PM   #7
Blind In 1 Ear
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i played in my high school show band where we played R&B, disco, pop, jazz, and rock. so i really learned how to play different rhythms. i already liked and played that stuff along with other stuff, but putting it in a real life band makes you better i think. i've been in other bands and jam with people when i can. i also like to practice to jam tracks or just songs, i also just jam alone a lot and write. i usually mentally picture myself playing live when i'm jamming to tracks and stuff though and i find it helps. sometimes i actually get pre stage nerves lol. i think if you learn to love just making music, it will come easier and like with anything, the more you do it the better you get. it's all in your head really. you have to play rhythm like it's all you are going to play. don't just give it your all in solos, give it your all always. that may seem obvious but a lot of people kind of just go on auto pilot when it comes to rhythm. sure it can sound good, but it wont sound as engaging as if you REALLY mean it. you shouldn't really change your mind set much when going from rhythm to lead. to me, i just see making music.

if it's certain patterns or timing or speed that's an issue, that really just comes down to practice. take it slow, work on accuracy and control first and staying loose. there are lots of lessons on youtube and online you can find on strumming patterns and rhythmic ideas, you just have to take the time to find them. again i find your mind set has to be in the right place if you want to progress.

also for bass, think like a drummer. sounds weird but it helps a lot. in fact, think like a drummer for guitar too. try to be in the pocket with the kick and snare and adjust your dynamics to bring out the snare hit. the bass should be more with the kick. if the guitar and bass are tight with the snare and kick like that, you'll sound good and rhythmic. when i play guitar i'm thinking of the whole song, not just the guitar part. i'm thinking how i want the guitar to fit in this or how can i express the drums, bass and guitar on just guitar? i find when i do that the parts fit together a lot better.

remember, those who can solo well are also usually good rhythm players. good solos are rhythmic in nature, not just notes over some chords. rhythm applies to everything so if you want to get better at rhythm, THINK about rhythm anytime you play. it's probably the most basic part of music so you really should be thinking about it all the time. eventually, you will love it and feel it and you wont have to consciously think about it, but you'll be aware of it.
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Old 08-15-2013, 03:20 PM   #8
eric_wearing
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Practice upstroking, think like a drummer, slow down with a metronome, aaaand....sorry, I didn't understand your explanation of triplets. All I get is that it's a tad off beat, right? I assumed that it'd be played as one note between each beat count like this (b=beat/kick/snare/click/whatever. t=triplet):

-b---b---b---b-
.....t....t.....t....

rather than

-b---b---b---b-
..t.....t....t.....t
__________________
Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

Quote:
Originally Posted by DBKGUITAR
To be a good lead guitar you must be VERY GOOD AT RYTHM

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggaraMarine
My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!

Last edited by eric_wearing : 08-15-2013 at 03:22 PM.
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Old 08-16-2013, 06:31 AM   #9
MaggaraMarine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eric_wearing
Practice upstroking, think like a drummer, slow down with a metronome, aaaand....sorry, I didn't understand your explanation of triplets. All I get is that it's a tad off beat, right? I assumed that it'd be played as one note between each beat count like this (b=beat/kick/snare/click/whatever. t=triplet):

-b---b---b---b-
.....t....t.....t....

rather than

-b---b---b---b-
..t.....t....t.....t

Triplets are not off beat. They are like 16ths or 8ths. You just play three equally long notes at the time of one beat (if we are talking about 8th triplets). Similarly we would play two 8ths or four 16ths at the time of one beat. One quarter note = two 8th notes = three 8th triplet notes = four 16th notes.

So if we have one bar in 4/4 time signature, you could play 12 equally long notes if you played 8th triplets.



So this is how you would count. The upper line is beats in a bar and the lower line is demonstrating a triplet rhythm. There are three notes per beat.
Code:
1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3


It's pretty similar to 6/8 time signature where you would count like this:

1 2 3 4 5 6

So the first and fourth beats are the strong beats. So in 6/8 you count in two. You could also think it as 2/4 with triplets.

Example of 6/8:
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Last edited by MaggaraMarine : 08-16-2013 at 06:40 AM.
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Old 08-16-2013, 03:12 PM   #10
eric_wearing
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Ooooohhhhhhh me at this moment lol well thanks. I was confused cos my first time consciously hearing a triplet was in a jam band in my computer, the first triplet shown was a half note triplet (with the basic eighth as the fastest available). Now that you've shown me I can hear the rhythm of the thing heh.

I'm starting to see a pattern in my learning though. I overthink things...this common for self taught kids like me?
__________________
Theory is just...wow. I'm getting a bit over my head by trying to learn so much w/o formal educators

Quote:
Originally Posted by DBKGUITAR
To be a good lead guitar you must be VERY GOOD AT RYTHM

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggaraMarine
My motto: Play what the song needs you to play!
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Old 08-19-2013, 07:37 AM   #11
Realityburn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eric_wearing
Ooooohhhhhhh me at this momentI'm starting to see a pattern in my learning though. I overthink things...this common for self taught kids like me?


Somewhat.

I'm starting to delve into theory after years and years of playing by ear, and I'm realizing that a lot of it is much simpler than I thought it was.

If you want a good example of triplets played at extreme speed, listen to Slayer's "Raining Blood" and pretty much anything by Lamb of God.

Once you have triplets down, you'll be able to start throwing them in at any random point in a song you feel like. Not generally a good idea if you're playing a cover song, but it can spice up a riff you're writing if the rhythm is a little boring or stale.

I can't play a good lead to save my life, but I can play in time with just about anything I've run across so far. You know what's surprisingly hard to play in time? Bluegrass.
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Old 08-19-2013, 09:26 PM   #12
cdgraves
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Rhythm has nothing to do with speed. It's all about knowing where you are in relation to the beat.

As probably the most important part of all music, there is plenty of practice literature for Rhythm on all instruments. I think if you can discipline yourself to work on rhythm several days a week, you'll get excellent results from a method book. Those are available at most any music store or book store.

Once you get a feel for what it means to play rhythmically, you can come up with your own exercises, too.

Learn whatever music you like. As your rhythm improves, you'll find it's easier to learn and play all kinds of music.
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Old 08-21-2013, 02:20 AM   #13
Realityburn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cdgraves
Rhythm has nothing to do with speed. It's all about knowing where you are in relation to the beat.


Very true.

But I've found that the faster the tempo is, the easier it is to get lost.

For me personally, it's harder to play at slow tempos than fast ones. I focused so much on staying in time at ridiculous tempos that it throws me off when I have to play something extremely slow.
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