Go Back   UG Community @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com > Music > Musician Talk > Singing & Vocals
User Name  
Password
Search:

Reply
Old 08-29-2013, 03:15 PM   #1
pAWNlol
master of the diddly-doo
 
pAWNlol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Bass/baritone songs???

my voice is right along the line of bass and baritone. on average the lowest note i can hit is and F2

it would be nice to sing along to something that would be easy on my voice, rather than trying to force myself into the tenor range, which so many of my favorite bands enjoy.

does anybody know any songs or pieces with a bass/baritone singer? id like to enhance my low register even more. any help would be greatly appreciated
__________________
How funny is this joke?

very funny

MY YOUTUBE CHANNEL
pAWNlol is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2013, 05:03 PM   #2
InstantMustache
Is probably genitals
 
InstantMustache's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
If you don't mind working with classical, I'd suggest the book '26 Italian Art Songs and Arias'. You can get it online for around $20. I'm a low bass, and working through those songs has done wonders for my technique, as well as my overall musicality.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by stealstrings




C:
InstantMustache is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2013, 06:44 PM   #3
jaybrink10101
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Bruce Springsteen, some of Devin Townsend's stuff is manageable (Life, Supercrush are sort of upper Baritone), Killswitch Engage is supposed to be good, not that I've ever really tried.
jaybrink10101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2013, 07:38 PM   #4
pAWNlol
master of the diddly-doo
 
pAWNlol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
i really dont feel like purchasing anything, id rather hear the songs somewhere like youtube

also @instantmustache: which do you think i am? because the range tests always say that the notes listed are just approximations.

depending on the time of day, how much warming up ive done, and other factors, i can sing usually as low as an E2, on higher days an F#2, and on rare occasions, as low as a D2
__________________
How funny is this joke?

very funny

MY YOUTUBE CHANNEL
pAWNlol is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2013, 12:22 AM   #5
20Tigers
1
 
20Tigers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Here's a ton of baritone songs. (At least I am pretty sure they are all baritone.) There is kind of a range of singers and styles. Some have a silky smooth voice others have a gravelly rough voice. Some have a tender voice, some have power. There are a ton more baritone voices out there. It is after all the most common voice type...




































==========

I'll tell you a secret though. You can sing any song you like. You just need to transpose it to a comfortable range and do a new arrangement to suit the new dimension your own voice will add to the song.

To give you a concrete example compare the following versions of the same song...



__________________
Si
20Tigers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2013, 11:07 AM   #6
pAWNlol
master of the diddly-doo
 
pAWNlol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
holy crap 20tigers lol i was NOT expecting such a massive explosion of samples, but thanks i guess
__________________
How funny is this joke?

very funny

MY YOUTUBE CHANNEL
pAWNlol is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2013, 02:11 PM   #7
Cavalcade
Days, I feel it...
 
Cavalcade's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
For metal, Machinae Supremacy and Twelve Foot Ninja have some great baritone songs.










Quote:
Originally Posted by 20Tigers
I'll tell you a secret though. You can sing any song you like. You just need to transpose it to a comfortable range and do a new arrangement to suit the new dimension your own voice will add to the song.

This. Audacity's Change Pitch function is your friend.
__________________
If you're reading this, it means UG still has this, but not a :sam: smiley.

Last edited by Cavalcade : 08-30-2013 at 03:12 PM.
Cavalcade is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2013, 05:46 PM   #8
Sethis
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
What you want is easy songs not bass baritone songs. Don't let that be an excuse for your lack of technique. I really see a tendency these days to assume that a trained singer who sings high is a tenor while a baritone will always be straining in chest voice and will never sing anything above a F4.

And actually the lowest note you can hit doesn't mean anything. The F2 a classical baritone is expected to hit should be able to be heard above an entire orchestra and reach thousands of people without a mic. Could you say that about that F2?

For the moment throw these classifications in the trash and work on getting to the best version of your voice.

Last edited by Sethis : 08-30-2013 at 05:48 PM.
Sethis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2013, 08:48 PM   #9
20Tigers
1
 
20Tigers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by pAWNlol
holy crap 20tigers lol i was NOT expecting such a massive explosion of samples, but thanks i guess

Yeah I didn't realize just how many I had put in there. You said you wanted YouTube examples so I thought I'd post some links.

I am a bass-baritone myself. So it was pretty easy for me to come up with a whole bunch off the top of my head. I got a bit carried away though, I kept thinking, "oh yeah this one, oh and there's this one too...". Still there's a range of baritone voices in there. I wasn't really sure what style of music you're into though.
__________________
Si
20Tigers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2013, 09:39 PM   #10
pAWNlol
master of the diddly-doo
 
pAWNlol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
@sethis: keep your negativity to yourself. yes i still strain a little, but thats because ive only recently been genuinely practicing my vocals, rather than just quietly singing to myself. and at the moment, no, my F2 is not that loud, for that exact same reason. im relatively new, hence why i made a post ASKING FOR ADVICE

also, no, im not looking for "easy" songs. i can reach notes between the F4 and A4 without much difficulty. im doing exactly what i said i was: looking for songs that are in my comfort zone, and will help me enhance my low register. plus, itll be fun to finally sing something that actually is low, instead of songs that maybe have 1 or 2 low notes

so unless you can read my mind, dont tell me what my reasons "really" are

@cavalcade: lol im already a big fan of 12 foot ninja. funny thing is i was actually planning on listening to "aint that a bitch" tonight, and you saved me from having to look it up on youtube XD thanks!

@20tigers: hey, i never complained lol i was just saying i wasnt expecting you to go the extra mile

so to both 20tigers and cavalcade, big thanks!
__________________
How funny is this joke?

very funny

MY YOUTUBE CHANNEL
pAWNlol is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2013, 10:31 PM   #11
pAWNlol
master of the diddly-doo
 
pAWNlol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
i only have one comment/complaint; with the exception of johnny cash and leonard cohen, none of the videos were really that low. they were certainly more comfortable for me, but not as low as i expected

maybe im a bass and not a baritone lol

Edit: just an extra tidbit of info so you can get an idea of my voice; though i can sing them directly on pitch, i can also sing "aint that a bitch" and "in my life" an octave below
__________________
How funny is this joke?

very funny

MY YOUTUBE CHANNEL

Last edited by pAWNlol : 09-01-2013 at 10:34 PM.
pAWNlol is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2013, 11:28 PM   #12
Cavalcade
Days, I feel it...
 
Cavalcade's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by pAWNlol
...an octave below

Do that. I've found that a lot of Kamelot songs actually sound really good an octave down, and they're not painfully high to begin with (especially for power metal).

And if you want low metal, it's in your best interest to start listening to Moonspell.

__________________
If you're reading this, it means UG still has this, but not a :sam: smiley.

Last edited by Cavalcade : 09-01-2013 at 11:37 PM.
Cavalcade is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2013, 12:52 AM   #13
pAWNlol
master of the diddly-doo
 
pAWNlol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cavalcade
Do that. I've found that a lot of Kamelot songs actually sound really good an octave down, and they're not painfully high to begin with (especially for power metal).

And if you want low metal, it's in your best interest to start listening to Moonspell.

thats just the thing though, i dont want to do that anymore. yeah, its good practice too, but i want to find songs that are already low

also, the music doesnt have to be metal. and my idea of "really low" is any note from A2 and lower lol maybe i am a bass
__________________
How funny is this joke?

very funny

MY YOUTUBE CHANNEL
pAWNlol is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2013, 01:44 AM   #14
20Tigers
1
 
20Tigers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by pAWNlol
i only have one comment/complaint; with the exception of johnny cash and leonard cohen, none of the videos were really that low. they were certainly more comfortable for me, but not as low as i expected

maybe im a bass and not a baritone lol

Hmm... maybe I'm way off but I thought...

The opening line of Mother by Pink Floyd starts on D3 and goes down to G2. If F2 is your lowest pitch then this should be right on.

John Lee Hooker pitches around A3 in that particular song but goes down to E2. Many of his other songs also go that low but are lower in general.

Cat Stevens also goes into that second octave in Father and Son I think around G2 but also goes into his upper register. He has some range though. At the start of this song he sings in a easy style with a bit of glottal fry going then gets soulful when he shifts into his upper register in the bridge. In other songs he is very light and high (Morning has Broken).

Scott Weiland in the introduction "This is a song called plush" is not singing but his speaking voice goes down to around G2 he mostly sings in the third octave.

Compare that with Johnny Cash's spoken intro in "The Man Comes Around" Weiland goes a minor third lower. - But Mr Cash's voice has more weight to it.

In that song - "When the Man Comes Around" - Im pretty sure he doesn't go any lower than the Pink Floyd or Cat Stevens songs I posted above.

The difference is in the timbre of the voice. It's weight. Cash has a heavy voice if you line him up next to Roger Waters or Scott Weiland and get them to sing the same pitch one after the other people will hear Cash as being lower even though he's not.

If your lowest note is F2 then you are most likely a baritone (possibly a bass baritone). A true bass is pretty rare.

We had a kid in my year at high school that was a true bass. His voice boomed at these low frequencies with clarity just when he was speaking. Everyone loved it.

Vin Diesel is a bass, probably not much of a singer but his voice is pretty damned cool. And chicks loooove it. Baritone...Johnny Cash even, meh but Vin Diesel speaks and they melt.

-Disclaimer - I might be off with some of these pitches as I haven't studied these songs in depth or anything I'm just sittin with my guitar but pretty sure I am about right with most of them. -ready to be embarrassed though.
__________________
Si
20Tigers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2013, 04:46 AM   #15
Sethis
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
@pAWNlol: And advice is what you got. Not negativity. You don't have to sing baritone songs and neither you have to "force" yourself into the tenor range. Noone can sing "tenor songs" when they're untrained, not even tenors. I'm saying that just because you sing low you don't even have to be a bass/baritone. And if your lowest note is around F2 and it's not very powerful either chances are that you aren't one. I can't blame a new guy for wanting to sing lower songs that would be easier at that moment for them. But I see a lot of beginners, even tenors who think they're baritones at first and that mindset only seems to limit their growth as singers and that's why I posted that for everyone who might have a similar question.

Anyway here are some bands like these:



Last edited by Sethis : 09-02-2013 at 04:50 AM.
Sethis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2013, 11:43 AM   #16
pAWNlol
master of the diddly-doo
 
pAWNlol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
ive been doing plenty of songs that are much higher up, and with little to no difficulty, so no i really am not just looking for something "easy". im looking for low songs for the fun of it, and for the sake of strengthening my low register.

if it helps you get an idea of my range, though F2 is usually my lowest, i can often reach an E2, and yet this song is still relatively easy for me. on a scale of 1-10 for difficulty, id give it maybe a 4-5
__________________
How funny is this joke?

very funny

MY YOUTUBE CHANNEL

Last edited by pAWNlol : 09-02-2013 at 12:40 PM.
pAWNlol is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2013, 01:24 PM   #17
Milan999
Registered User
 
Milan999's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Quote:
Originally Posted by 20Tigers
Hmm... maybe I'm way off but I thought...

The opening line of Mother by Pink Floyd starts on D3 and goes down to G2. If F2 is your lowest pitch then this should be right on.

John Lee Hooker pitches around A3 in that particular song but goes down to E2. Many of his other songs also go that low but are lower in general.

Cat Stevens also goes into that second octave in Father and Son I think around G2 but also goes into his upper register. He has some range though. At the start of this song he sings in a easy style with a bit of glottal fry going then gets soulful when he shifts into his upper register in the bridge. In other songs he is very light and high (Morning has Broken).

Scott Weiland in the introduction "This is a song called plush" is not singing but his speaking voice goes down to around G2 he mostly sings in the third octave.

Compare that with Johnny Cash's spoken intro in "The Man Comes Around" Weiland goes a minor third lower. - But Mr Cash's voice has more weight to it.

In that song - "When the Man Comes Around" - Im pretty sure he doesn't go any lower than the Pink Floyd or Cat Stevens songs I posted above.

The difference is in the timbre of the voice. It's weight. Cash has a heavy voice if you line him up next to Roger Waters or Scott Weiland and get them to sing the same pitch one after the other people will hear Cash as being lower even though he's not.

If your lowest note is F2 then you are most likely a baritone (possibly a bass baritone). A true bass is pretty rare.

We had a kid in my year at high school that was a true bass. His voice boomed at these low frequencies with clarity just when he was speaking. Everyone loved it.

Vin Diesel is a bass, probably not much of a singer but his voice is pretty damned cool. And chicks loooove it. Baritone...Johnny Cash even, meh but Vin Diesel speaks and they melt.

-Disclaimer - I might be off with some of these pitches as I haven't studied these songs in depth or anything I'm just sittin with my guitar but pretty sure I am about right with most of them. -ready to be embarrassed though.


I think you may be confused. You seem to be lowering the lowest note for most of these songs. Pink Floyd's "Mother" goes to a G3 as the lowest end note.

According to a website I use, Cat Stevens' "Father and Son" range is E3-E6.

Last edited by Milan999 : 09-04-2013 at 01:25 PM.
Milan999 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2013, 01:32 PM   #18
Milan999
Registered User
 
Milan999's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Toronto, Ontario
But as has been mentioned, you don't need specific songs to sing low. Just stick a capo on the guitar or tune it lower and sing the songs in a lower key.
Milan999 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2013, 05:30 PM   #19
20Tigers
1
 
20Tigers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Milan999
I think you may be confused. You seem to be lowering the lowest note for most of these songs. Pink Floyd's "Mother" goes to a G3 as the lowest end note.

According to a website I use, Cat Stevens' "Father and Son" range is E3-E6.


Maybe I am singing an octave down but what website are you using???

To clarify the octave numbering system I use is "scientific pitch notation". It is not uncommon for different sources to use different numbers for the octaves - what one person calls E3, another calls E2.

I may well be wrong with my transcription of the notes above but I bring this up this because E6 is a really high note. It is two whole steps higher than a Soprano high C (C6)!!

For easy audible reference grab your guitar...
E2 is the lowest note on the guitar.
E3 is D string 2nd fret,
E4 is the open high E string,
E5 is the high E string at the 12th fret, and
E6 would be the 24th fret on the high E string (higher than many guitars go and higher than many singers go).

I can't think of any notes in Father and Son that go that high, so though I may well be wrong about some of those low notes, I am very dubious about the accuracy of your web source.
__________________
Si
20Tigers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2013, 10:09 PM   #20
pAWNlol
master of the diddly-doo
 
pAWNlol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
quick question, i know its not the range test forum, but everyone admits that range tests are objective: im not sure if im a bass or baritone!!! i can comfortably sing between F2 and F4, but my super-duper comfort zone (where i totally shine) is between C3 and C4

what do you guys think? bass or baritone?

im thinking bassitone lol
__________________
How funny is this joke?

very funny

MY YOUTUBE CHANNEL
pAWNlol is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:25 AM.

Forum Archives / About / Terms of Use / Advertise / Contact / Ultimate-Guitar.Com © 2014
Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.