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Old 10-06-2013, 05:28 AM   #1
greg73
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ear training

Hiya , im currently trying to train my ear both with and without my guitar .

I play the c major scale a lot , and name the notes while I am playing , but when I go to ricci adams ear training thingy and have to guess the notes being played I really suck .

Is there a simpler way to train my ear till I get better at the ricci adams thing? I've been trying to just listen and going to reveal answer without looking , but I seem to be getting nowhere .

ty in advance
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Old 10-06-2013, 05:38 AM   #2
GoldenGuitar
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Work on interval recognition rather than pitch recognition. Playing the notes of the C major scale and naming the notes is not ear training.
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Old 10-06-2013, 06:32 AM   #3
Sickz
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My ear training is mostly done by transcribing music. I learned a method from a jazz piano teacher at the local college for music how to best train your ear when transcribing lines and it has benefited me much, so i recommend it to all of my students as well. The method is:

1) Work out the line in every key. If you aren't technically adept at playing the line, it won't matter how well you can hear it!

2) Sing and play the line at the same time.

3) Sing and ghost the line. Meaning sing the line and put your fingers where the notes are, but don't play them. Is is for associating sounds that you sing when places on the fretboard.

4) Sing the line over the chord/chord progression.

All of this should be done in every key and at a comfortable tempo. If you're dealing with a 16th note line you want to slow that down so you can sing it as accurate as possible.

I don't know if this was what you were looking for, but in my opinion it is a much more practical approach to ear training and improvisation in general. Combined with Goldenguitar' advice that is.
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Quote:
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Quote:
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"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."

Last edited by Sickz : 10-06-2013 at 06:33 AM.
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Old 10-06-2013, 07:25 AM   #4
greg73
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Sorry , I probably should know for sure what your saying when you say transcribing , but im not 100 % sure .

I am assuming trans meaning across and scribing meaning writing , that you write what you hear?

And as for the singing , im trying to doris day aswell ( and trying to ignore who sings what notes in what language ) , but I still don't understand how I should know how my diaghphram ( I am assuming) knows what note jam and bread and needles and thread are .
\
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Old 10-06-2013, 07:34 AM   #5
greg73
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So if I play 5 7 8 on my top e string is that do re mi?

Sorry , ive read multiple threads on singing the notes while playing , but never really understood them ( and im scared if I sing too much my missus will chop out my tongue )
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Old 10-06-2013, 09:15 AM   #6
Sickz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greg73
Sorry , I probably should know for sure what your saying when you say transcribing , but im not 100 % sure .

I am assuming trans meaning across and scribing meaning writing , that you write what you hear?

And as for the singing , im trying to doris day aswell ( and trying to ignore who sings what notes in what language ) , but I still don't understand how I should know how my diaghphram ( I am assuming) knows what note jam and bread and needles and thread are .
\


Well, transcribing can be two things. When some people say they transcribe they mean that they sit down and learn stuff by ear and then write it down in notation, and others mean that they just learn stuff by ear on their instrument. I mean the later one, just learning by ear. Both are valid, but i mainly use it cause i want to improve at replicating what i hear on my instrument.

As for the singing, don't over-think it, singing on an "Ah" can be enough. I am no singer, but i am doing this only to strengthen the connection between my ear and my instrument, using singing as a bridge between the two. The goal is of course to be able to get a good enough connection between what you do on your instrument and the sound you're imagining in your head that you can improvise regardless of knowing the key of the song or not.

Maybe Guthrie can explain it better than me.



I hope that helped.
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Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote:
Originally Posted by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
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Old 10-06-2013, 10:29 AM   #7
P_Trik
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenGuitar
Work on interval recognition rather than pitch recognition. Playing the notes of the C major scale and naming the notes is not ear training.



x2 what GoldenGuitar said. I have met only two people in 20+ some years of working with musicians that had so-called 'perfect pitch', which is the ability to identify a pitch out of thin air and I'm not sure what their percentage of accuracy was. Most musicians, certainly myself included, identify pitches, including nuances within chords, by the intervals from the key note, or from the root of that particular chord or from the note preceding it in a melody.

There are free sites designed to help with practicing like this one (I just used google, and have no affiliation with it) :

http://www.musicalintervalstutor.info/

And there's even an app for android phones called Interval Recognition-Ear Train that is also free. You should already have an understanding of the fundamentals of keys/scales and basic harmony to make the most of it.

Good luck!!
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Old 10-06-2013, 01:09 PM   #8
HotspurJr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greg73
Is there a simpler way to train my ear till I get better at the ricci adams thing? I've been trying to just listen and going to reveal answer without looking , but I seem to be getting nowhere .


I don't know what the ricci adams thing is.

Unlike others, I actually don't think that interval recognition training ends up being that helpful. Here's what I would recommend. Understand that ear training pays the biggest results if you do it every day. You don't have to do it a lot, but do it every day.

Start by transcribing simple melodies that you know by heart with your guitar, even if it means hunting and pecking. Nursery rhymes, christmas carols, movie themes. Just find he melody on your guitar without looking anything up. This may be surprisingly hard at first, but that's okay. Let yourself hunt and peck.

Then start using the functional ear trainer, which is a free download from miles.be. Again, this may seem very hard at first, but keep at it.

Once you've gotten some comfort with that, you might consider adding a book like "Ear Training for the Contemporary Musician" by Wyatt et al. This is going to be about transcribing progressively harder and harder things away from your instrument - no hunting and pecking allowed.

Ear training is like learning a language: slow and steady. You just have to keep at it. You'll often be stuck at a certain place for a while and then have a breakthrough. Keep at it. The functional ear trainer is what gave me my biggest breakthrough, and I'm sure that part of that is that it's super easy for me to just do it for a little bit every day.
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Old 10-06-2013, 02:16 PM   #9
SuperKid
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this is what i use for ear training
http://www.iwasdoingallright.com/to..._training/main/

really good website, actually better than most of the ear training software you'd have to buy
start with intervals recognition
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Old 10-06-2013, 05:53 PM   #10
Black_devils
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Work on nursery songs like twinkle twinkle star by ear don't bite off more than you can chew.
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Old 10-07-2013, 03:27 AM   #11
atza
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To me unless you have that natural gift of absolute pitch than it is impossible to learn to recognize notes (unless in some context as if within a song you know the key and harmony of)
What i try to acomplish and have succes is to recognize standard chord progressions and scales. than it is just matter of seconds to find actual key on your instrument.
Other thing that I noticed is that if you know beging of a song and you know its in say Am it happens to me a lot that i instantly recognize Am in other songs if they happen to hace similar sound.
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Old 10-07-2013, 04:45 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atza
To me unless you have that natural gift of absolute pitch than it is impossible to learn to recognize notes (unless in some context as if within a song you know the key and harmony of)
What i try to acomplish and have succes is to recognize standard chord progressions and scales. than it is just matter of seconds to find actual key on your instrument.
Other thing that I noticed is that if you know beging of a song and you know its in say Am it happens to me a lot that i instantly recognize Am in other songs if they happen to hace similar sound.

It doesn't matter if you have perfect pitch or not (and just a few people have it). It doesn't matter if you know the absolute pitch of a note somebody's playing right now. You only need to know it in context - there's really no use for it out of context (C note in the key of C sounds completely different than C note in the key of Eb). Learning them in context is the stuff. And many people can hear the scale degrees/intervals/chords somebody's playing (in context of course). I would say I'm pretty good at figuring out chord progressions and intervals by ear. But I still need some time to think, I wouldn't say I can instantly play what I hear. Sometimes I can do it pretty well and sometimes not. And my goal in playing the guitar is to be able to play what I hear without even needing to think about it.
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Old 10-07-2013, 11:56 AM   #13
greg73
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Ty all , given me lots to look at and practise , and yes , listen to too!
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Old 03-03-2014, 09:03 PM   #14
birdbridge
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hey greg73! focus on relative pitch. and focus on your intervals! learn them as scale degrees and learn them even in isolated instances. i'd learn them both!

this ear training guide has a lot of good tips for getting this done!

http://www.reddit.com/r/musictheory/comments/1mde7c/the_ear_training_resource_guide/

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