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Old 11-11-2013, 07:57 AM   #1
kyuseok
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Gibson Les Paul Custom vs Epiphone Les Paul Custom PRO

Can Gibson's model use coil-splitting with pushing/pulling knobs?
and what are the differences between them except body, fretboard wood materials, and bridge??
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Old 11-11-2013, 08:06 AM   #2
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No. But coil splitting isn't a particularly good feature anyway. It makes the pickups underpowered.

The differences between the two guitars are vast. To put it simply, virtually every component of a Gibson and the way those features are applied is better than an Epiphone.

I just wish a sticky was made to specifically describe the differences between the two guitars because this topic is so common.
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Old 11-11-2013, 08:26 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by T00DEEPBLUE
No. But coil splitting isn't a particularly good feature anyway. It makes the pickups underpowered.

The differences between the two guitars are vast. To put it simply, virtually every component of a Gibson and the way those features are applied is better than an Epiphone.

I just wish a sticky was made to specifically describe the differences between the two guitars because this topic is so common.

Thnx
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Old 11-11-2013, 09:03 AM   #4
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An Australian company, Maton - http://www.maton.com.au/ have put some pickups in their Mastersound series that they claim have no drop in output when tapped. I have yet to try one out. The previous models had a noticeable drop in output. I tried the Josh Homme signature model a couple of years ago.

The 2013 Gibson Les Paul Standard has coil taps and would still remain a superior Guitar to the Epiphone LP Custom PRO.
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Old 11-11-2013, 09:07 AM   #5
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My PRS sound great in HB mode or in single coil. But the pickups were designed to do this
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Old 11-11-2013, 09:37 AM   #6
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Truth be told, TS, I've played some Epiphone's that I preferred over the Gibson counter part. I've played some Gibson's I've preferred over the Epiphone's.

Quality of wood is a factor, and the components, but to be honest, that can all be swapped out relatively cheaply. pots and caps are very cheap. You could swap the cheap asian electronics out for something superior. You can also upgrade the bridge and tail piece rather cheap. And if you like the pick ups, keep them. if you don't, swap them. Personally, while many would consider the Gibson version to be the superior instrument, it all comes down to your preferences. If you like the feel of the epi, the sound of the epi or feel you can mod it and still have a wallet friendly purchase, I say go with the epi. if you like it, that's all that matters. in my opinion, change the pots, caps, the bridge and tail piece, and maybe the pickups (the pickups depend on you), and you've got a gibson at a fraction of the cost.
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Old 11-11-2013, 05:20 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by kurt_cobain9
Truth be told, TS, I've played some Epiphone's that I preferred over the Gibson counter part. I've played some Gibson's I've preferred over the Epiphone's.

Quality of wood is a factor, and the components, but to be honest, that can all be swapped out relatively cheaply. pots and caps are very cheap. You could swap the cheap asian electronics out for something superior. You can also upgrade the bridge and tail piece rather cheap. And if you like the pick ups, keep them. if you don't, swap them. Personally, while many would consider the Gibson version to be the superior instrument, it all comes down to your preferences. If you like the feel of the epi, the sound of the epi or feel you can mod it and still have a wallet friendly purchase, I say go with the epi. if you like it, that's all that matters. in my opinion, change the pots, caps, the bridge and tail piece, and maybe the pickups (the pickups depend on you), and you've got a gibson at a fraction of the cost.

While I agree you can get a great Epi, changing out parts doesn't give you a Gibson on a budget. It gives you a Epi that you put more money in, then it will be worth into.
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Old 11-12-2013, 09:08 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robbgnarly
While I agree you can get a great Epi, changing out parts doesn't give you a Gibson on a budget. It gives you a Epi that you put more money in, then it will be worth into.


Like I said, Pots aren't that much. Caps aren't that much. pickups are probably the most expensive thing you're going to throw in there. If you were going to fork out the money for a gibson les paul custom, you already have more money than you really do brains. By putting the money into the epi, you're not going to have an inferior instrument to the gibson, and you're still not going to put in more money than it's worth. most of that price tag on the gibson comes from the name on the headstock. While I respect your opinion, I gotta agree to disagree, because there is really nothing special about a gibson compared to an epiphone. it doesn't take much to make an epi stand up to a stock gibson, and you're still forking out a fraction of the price.
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Old 11-12-2013, 09:46 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by kyuseok
Can Gibson's model use coil-splitting with pushing/pulling knobs?


Virtually any humbucker guitar can be set up with coil-splitting.
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Old 11-12-2013, 10:08 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by T00DEEPBLUE
No. But coil splitting isn't a particularly good feature anyway. It makes the pickups underpowered.


Highly inaccurate blanket statement, IMHO.

I think coil-splitting is a great feature. As for "underpowered," -- it depends on the pickups. Some humbuckers sound great when split, and I have several examples on my guitars. I have a few guitars with three-way individual miniswitches for each pickup that allow me to select serial/parallel/single coil operation. A couple of others have P Rail pickups (this is applicable to LP Customs, of course) that allow you to select serial (standard humbucker), parallel, P90 coil and rail coil operation. Each of the coils is a full-on coil of that particular pickup, and there are three levels of power choice for PRails.

Quote:
Originally Posted by T00DEEPBLUE
The differences between the two guitars are vast. To put it simply, virtually every component of a Gibson and the way those features are applied is better than an Epiphone. I just wish a sticky was made to specifically describe the differences between the two guitars because this topic is so common


I'm not at all sure that's true. "Better" is really a subjective evaluation, and while you would certainly *expect* that Gibson would give you better everything across the board given the price difference, I'm not sure that's really true.

I have an Agile Custom (we'll use that to fill in for Epiphone for the moment) that arrived on the very same day as an Axcess Custom some years ago. Both have ebony fretboards, real shell inlays (the Agile is abalone, the Gibson is MOP), multilayer binding. The Agile has a 3/4" flame top, the Axcess is all mahogany. The Axcess has a two-piece body, the Agile has a one-piece body. The Axcess is a set neck, the Agile neck-through. Both have the same OFR, both have identical pickups, sustainers, tuners, pots, everything. Both needed a run on the PLEK and a fret superglue. The Gibson's pricetag was $4K, the Agile's was $1100. In the end, set up identically in every way, the Agile ended up being the better guitar and has a better spec. I prefer the way it plays and sounds (there are differences due to construction).

I can't say that the same applies to the Epiphone, but I haven't seen a sticky anywhere that really identifies specific differences between the Gibson and the Epiphone version in terms of "better" or quantifies those differences as a component of the price spread.



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Old 11-12-2013, 10:23 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dspellman
Highly inaccurate blanket statement, IMHO.

I think coil-splitting is a great feature. As for "underpowered," -- it depends on the pickups. Some humbuckers sound great when split, and I have several examples on my guitars. I have a few guitars with three-way individual miniswitches for each pickup that allow me to select serial/parallel/single coil operation. A couple of others have P Rail pickups (this is applicable to LP Customs, of course) that allow you to select serial (standard humbucker), parallel, P90 coil and rail coil operation. Each of the coils is a full-on coil of that particular pickup, and there are three levels of power choice for PRails.

I don''t see why really that matters when those pickups don't come on Gibson or Epiphone LP's.
Quote:
Originally Posted by dspellman
I'm not at all sure that's true. "Better" is really a subjective evaluation, and while you would certainly *expect* that Gibson would give you better everything across the board given the price difference, I'm not sure that's really true.

I see this point as rather contradictory. You've said that a Gibson LP objectively (as confirmed by the bolded word) isn't better given the price difference, when you just said that 'better' is a subjective evaluation. That it is wrong to objectify 'better', when you have just tried to objectify it in your own argument.
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Old 11-12-2013, 10:42 AM   #12
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Do the high end Epiphones come with Gibson-style nitrocellulose lacquer or is it poly like everyone else? It (nitro) can be gorgeous but it can also be pain. Its sticky before it dries properly (time should take care of that) and is picky about guitar stands: it gets stained by a lot of plastic paddings. And it yellows and even crack over time.
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Old 11-12-2013, 02:38 PM   #13
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Epiphones these days use all polyurethane finishes.
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Old 11-12-2013, 02:57 PM   #14
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i'm not certain that any modern day epiphones got nitro finishes.

maybe a high level mij orville RI, but i'm preeeety sure epi's are all poly.

dspellman or parwau (sp) will know for sure.
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Old 11-12-2013, 05:32 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by gregs1020
i'm not certain that any modern day epiphones got nitro finishes.

maybe a high level mij orville RI, but i'm preeeety sure epi's are all poly.

dspellman or parwau (sp) will know for sure.

Yes all production Epis are Poly finish. I'm not sure of the Elitist or the MIJ ones, but the one youy can buy in the USA are poly.
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Old 11-12-2013, 05:45 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by kurt_cobain9
Like I said, Pots aren't that much. Caps aren't that much. pickups are probably the most expensive thing you're going to throw in there. If you were going to fork out the money for a gibson les paul custom, you already have more money than you really do brains. By putting the money into the epi, you're not going to have an inferior instrument to the gibson, and you're still not going to put in more money than it's worth. most of that price tag on the gibson comes from the name on the headstock. While I respect your opinion, I gotta agree to disagree, because there is really nothing special about a gibson compared to an epiphone. it doesn't take much to make an epi stand up to a stock gibson, and you're still forking out a fraction of the price.

I've owned several LP customs and they were great guitars. Not overpriced at all IMO. Just because you can not justify spending the money on one, doesn't mean others feel the same. What is speciall is that it is not a Epi, it is a Gibson. If you put money into a Toyota does that make it as good or better than a Ferrari? Maybe, but the Ferrari is still a Ferrari and the Toyota is just that.
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Old 11-12-2013, 06:30 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Robbgnarly
Yes all production Epis are Poly finish. I'm not sure of the Elitist or the MIJ ones, but the one youy can buy in the USA are poly.


Currently the are all poly finishes. There were exceptions in the past, like the MIJ LQ-Series, the USA Series LP, SG & Map guitars and the Nashville Series Riviera and Sheraton. There is a good chance that any USA Epiphone will have a Nitro finish. Though I'm not certain about the Historic Reissue Wilshire. Probably though.
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Old 11-12-2013, 06:56 PM   #18
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I would say that the Epiphone can be about 90% that of a Gibson Custom, and possibly equal or better than a Studio. That last 10% may well be worth the extra couple thousand to some. However, since a lot of people like to bring up "worth", think about this: Buy the Gibson Custom and the moment you walk out the store with it, you've probably LOST as much money in resale as the entire Epiphone would cost. And you may still want to mod it.

Personally I prefer to just buy the lower cost guitars and mod them to my taste.
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Old 11-12-2013, 10:19 PM   #19
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I would say that the Epiphone can be about 90% that of a Gibson Custom, and possibly equal or better than a Studio. That last 10% may well be worth the extra couple thousand to some. However, since a lot of people like to bring up "worth", think about this: Buy the Gibson Custom and the moment you walk out the store with it, you've probably LOST as much money in resale as the entire Epiphone would cost. And you may still want to mod it.

Personally I prefer to just buy the lower cost guitars and mod them to my taste.


True that. Your net loss on a new Gibson is thousands more. All for the headstock and marginal quality over a hot-rodded Epi. To each their own, but thousands of my hard earned dollars will not go to a logo and open book headstock...its the same thing as throwing out a couple dandy players
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Old 11-12-2013, 10:28 PM   #20
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If you put money into a Toyota does that make it as good or better than a Ferrari? Maybe, but the Ferrari is still a Ferrari and the Toyota is just that.


The difference is we are not comparing a Toyota to a Ferrari. More like a Camaro ZL1 to a Corvette. The fields are not that far apart
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