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Old 01-15-2014, 01:52 PM   #1
maggotz0r
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Crooked fingers

Am i just wasting time playing with crooked fingers? Does it limit my ability? So frustrated, its haunting my mind
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Old 01-15-2014, 02:01 PM   #2
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Not 100% on what you mean by "crooked" exactly...
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Old 01-15-2014, 02:04 PM   #3
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In the politest way possible, quit whining and feeling sorry for yourself





I'm pretty sure their physical limitations make your crooked fingers seem trivial or even a non issue by comparison.
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Old 01-15-2014, 02:11 PM   #4
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Im not feeling sorry for myself, just my mind is troubled. I broke my forearm and had some complications for about a year of non playing. Since then im always trying to find something wrong with my hands. Thanks for the replies
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Old 01-16-2014, 12:09 AM   #5
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Keep playing and practicing. Never stop unless you are in constant pain or discomfort that persists even after years of playing.

I don't have any injuries but have very skinny uneven fingers with no surface area and a stub for a pinky. Some people have fat fingers. Some overly huge hands...And the list goes on.

If you're new expect pain. Everyone has to go through it...And to some extent there will always be periods of hand/finger/elbow pain depending on play style and how much you play.

If you can't seem to use common fingerings that others use, find a different area on the neck to play it... Change tunings. Or just find a way to adapt with two fingers or whatever the case may be.

If you love it and have reasonable use of your limbs you will find a way to reach your goals.
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Old 01-16-2014, 05:37 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by drop1337
If you're new expect pain. Everyone has to go through it...And to some extent there will always be periods of hand/finger/elbow pain depending on play style and how much you play.




This is terrible "advice". The only pain a beginner should expect if they're playing correctly is in the fingertips as they get used to fretting. Anything beyond that is a sign that you're doing something wrong.
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Old 01-16-2014, 11:07 AM   #7
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It doesn't help but just keep playing and you'll find ways around things to suit you
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Old 01-16-2014, 12:06 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Zaphod_Beeblebr


This is terrible "advice". The only pain a beginner should expect if they're playing correctly is in the fingertips as they get used to fretting. Anything beyond that is a sign that you're doing something wrong.



O rly?

If you would've read my post properly it says DEPENDING on how much you play AND other factors.

You have to realize some of us can play upwards of 8-10 hours a day, everyday. Even after years of conditioning there will still be periods of pain, periods where the fingertips are not in great shape, times when joints hurt, elbows hurt, wrists hurt... As you can see by the OP, everyone has different struggles. Not everyone has perfect fingers that are symmetrical, striaight and just mold to the fretboard like they were born with one in their hands. The stress it takes you to do certain fingerings, stretches, patterns, rolls, bars, may be completely different from me etc. But i'm sure i would probably never experience any type of discomfort if i wasn't constantly pushing myself to try new, more difficult things that are out of my comfort zone and just sat around the campfire strumming Kumbaya for an hour before bed every night. Not all of us are spring chickens anymore, either.

EDIT: And i can see in your personal pictures you have amazing symmetrical hands and fingers for guitar.. Your pinky is almost as long as my middle. Think before you make such broad statements.

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Old 01-16-2014, 12:37 PM   #9
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I wouldn't suggest an athlete train continously for 10 hours straight every day, nor would I tell a guitar play to play for 10 hours a day. If you take regular breaks in between sessions, no you shouldn't feel pain after playing. Pain is your bodies way of telling you to stop doing something.

It was terrible advice.
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Old 01-16-2014, 01:32 PM   #10
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I wouldn't suggest an athlete train continously for 10 hours straight every day, nor would I tell a guitar play to play for 10 hours a day. If you take regular breaks in between sessions, no you shouldn't feel pain after playing. Pain is your bodies way of telling you to stop doing something.

It was terrible advice.



Training in a gym that heavily taxes your CNS is quite a bit different from guitar. I've trained many years in the gym and with some of the most in shape, tree trunk legged people you can imagine and never was anything gained without some discomfort. Sometimes days of soreness afterwards. Expect more when doing something new or more complex. Granted, you don't want to come in the next day and blast all of the same stuff, but, nonetheless, the discomfort is still part of the gig at some point.

It was terrible advice to say you can experience periods of discomfort during a lifetime of pushing yourself on a rather large wooden instrument that has metal strings digging into the flesh of the fingers, propped against the wrist, hanging around your neck and putting direct pressure on one of the most complex joints in the body, the shoulder? Not everyone spends all their time sitting down with a USB plugged into Reaper playing studio queen.

Furthermore, some people have physical limitations, whether injury related or natural that will cause them to experience their guitar journey in a vastly different ways. A little pain never killed anyone. Quit sniveling, put on your big boy pants and realize that physical activities depending on all of the factors listed will result in some periods of less than ideal comfort.
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Old 01-16-2014, 02:32 PM   #11
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Quit sniveling, put on your big boy pants and realize that physical activities depending on all of the factors listed will result in some periods of less than ideal comfort.



Which types of pain exactly are you referring to? Because I will have to agree with Zaph here by saying that the only pain you should have is on the finger tips of your fretting hand. As long as you have correct technique and good posture, you shouldn't be having any pain.

Also, I don't really understand why you started about pain in the first place.. Oh well.


Oh and Steven, normally I tend to agree with you but you've been posting these video's on alot of threads and tbh I think they are a bit childish, let alone helpful.
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Old 01-16-2014, 03:32 PM   #12
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Thanks for the replies guys, but back to the topic. I realised that I am actually only struggling hard to do an F barre chord, when I started playing I spent about 6 hours a day just doing barre chords until I could play it perfectly. I'm probably just a little out of practice.
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Old 01-16-2014, 05:02 PM   #13
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Which types of pain exactly are you referring to? Because I will have to agree with Zaph here by saying that the only pain you should have is on the finger tips of your fretting hand. As long as you have correct technique and good posture, you shouldn't be having any pain.

Also, I don't really understand why you started about pain in the first place.. Oh well.


Oh and Steven, normally I tend to agree with you but you've been posting these video's on alot of threads and tbh I think they are a bit childish, let alone helpful.



Listen. It's obvious i'm not condoning playing while in tears or something. I mistakenly assumed the OP was also talking about some sort of pain or discomfort due to the fact he broke his forearm.

It really comes down to what you want to get out of your playing and what the ultimate goal is. I don't care to only sit around on my rump and record albums on my computer that only me and five other people will ever hear. I don't care to strum a few chords for a few minutes a day. I don't tend to back down and the first sign of resistance or go cry to mommy or think i need to see a Dr. every time i get a little sore or experience a little pain from a physical activity involving multiple facets of my body.

I like to keep the practice volume high and get out and play with people and overall keep it intense so if one day a few lucky stars align i am ready to answer the call. It's either in your DNA to push and grind for what you want to accomplish and accept some of the friction or it isn't. If you have to ask someone else if you should give up then you probably will. If you have to ask someone if you will make it then you probably will not.
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Old 01-16-2014, 07:32 PM   #14
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I don't tend to back down and the first sign of resistance or go cry to mommy or think i need to see a Dr. every time i get a little sore or experience a little pain from a physical activity involving multiple facets of my body.


No, in fact the first sign of resistance is the first sign of bad technique.
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Old 01-16-2014, 08:06 PM   #15
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No, in fact the first sign of resistance is the first sign of bad technique.



Yes. And you always have perfect technique and no resistance when learning new or difficult things.
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Old 01-17-2014, 06:38 AM   #16
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Yes. And you always have perfect technique and no resistance when learning new or difficult things.


I'm not saying that. I'm saying that whenever you feel resistance - whether you're learning something new or not - you should adjust your technique to the point where it feels comfortable for you.

The way you are saying it, is that TS should just "put on his big boy pants" and play through the "little pains". Well mr. big boy, I can guarantee you that "pushing and grinding" through those "little pains" will lead to some "not so little pains" and eventually to "tendonitis" and/or "carpal tunnel syndrome".
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Old 01-17-2014, 09:34 AM   #17
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If people didn't keep asking the same questions I wouldn't post then as much. I find they're far more effective in demonstrating what people can achieve on the guitar despite seemingly insurmountable physical limitations than anything I could write. I post then in response to two types of question - people fixated on trivial aspects of their physiology as an attempt to explain their lack of ability ( short fingers, small hands, big hands etc), and people with very real issues that understandably cause them to doubt whether or not they will ever be able to play the instrument.

So for one group they hopefully provide a sense or perspective and will make them realise their limitations are purey psychological, for the other they will hopefully act as a source of inspiration once they see what is possible despite seemingly impossible circumstances.

If you have any better ways to illustrate this i'll gladly use those instead
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Old 01-17-2014, 09:47 AM   #18
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..I guess you have a point.
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Old 01-18-2014, 09:52 AM   #19
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I agree, you don't want to mess around with it if your feeling actual pain. Some temporary soreness if you are trying something particularly different from what you are used to may be ok (e.g. working on chords a lot, if you've been in "metal mode" and neglecting them for several years previously), but this should only last for a few days. Actual pain is never ok.

One thing that is very important is to take breaks. At least 10 mins per hour, or better still 5 mins per half hour. If you can split your practice up into part in the morning, and part in the evening, then even better. Not only does it help protect your hands, but you learn better by giving your brain breaks to process what you have been learning.
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Old 01-19-2014, 03:22 AM   #20
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What do you guys suggest I do to get my hand back in shape to do barre chords?
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