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Old 02-13-2014, 06:39 PM   #1
Navi_96
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Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: In the hall of the Balkan king.
Head voice singing

I am a low baritone who wants to song metal in the style of Maiden, Dream Theater, etc. Not being any kind of tenor and with a passaggio somewhere around F#4-G#4, I am starting to understand the idea that I'll need head voice for stuff like that.

I have been able to create notes up to D5 (maybe an E5 once, not sure) by trying to "connect" my vocal cords and it definitely didn't feel like chest voice, but it wasn't falsetto either, these notes had more power (than falsetto), and I felt them "come from my head", so I think it's a safe deduction: that was head voice. But they sound really shouty and break into falsetto easily, and they reminded me most of a chipmunked James LaBrie .

What I'm wondering about is: how does one train their head voice, to gain more strength with it? It felt (after some attempts) like my gut is blocked and I couldn't support those notes with my lungs as well as I can do so with chest voice and falsetto. Does the chipmunk tone go away as the strength is gained? And how does one learn to better bridge between head and chest voice, so as to avoid awkward jumps around that tonality? Any guidelines to avoid strain? I would like to know some good exercises for these things so I can make this register useful for singing. I'd really appreciate some good tips on this...

Last edited by Navi_96 : 02-13-2014 at 07:11 PM.
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Old 02-14-2014, 04:10 AM   #2
Tyson2011
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First off, if you're actually a baritone you don't have a passagio around G#4, that will generally be the top of your range. I have a passagio there, but thats because I'm a leggiero tenor and I have the upper range.

If you're a baritone, you aren't going to sound like dream theater, thats all there is to it. We all have limitations on our voice, and you're better off accepting it and being the best baritone you can be, than being a sub par fake tenor. Theres lots of good baritone rep (much more than there is for tenor), so go do that.

Those notes that sound "connected" are, from my best guess with working with students that think they can get that high, just a really compressed falsetto that feels more connected due to the amount of energy being put into it.

Don't misunderstand me, I don't mean to come off as a prick. Its just that I teach students that want to sing outside of their fach all the time, and the results are generally less than good with them. Learn to accept your voice for what it is, and make beautiful music
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Old 02-14-2014, 10:53 AM   #3
KrisHQ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyson2011
Those notes that sound "connected" are, from my best guess with working with students that think they can get that high, just a really compressed falsetto that feels more connected due to the amount of energy being put into it.

Wanted to say this.
Just keep in mind though, that this is no critique. There are probably a lot of examples where something you like is a compressed falsetto or a "thin mix". I know James Labrie does it quite a lot actually.

Last edited by KrisHQ : 02-14-2014 at 10:55 AM.
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Old 02-14-2014, 12:29 PM   #4
Navi_96
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Join Date: Dec 2012
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Ok, I might have misused the term passaggio. F#4 is where my voice starts to "want" to go into falsetto slowly, so I guess there's a different term for that.

Now don't get me wrong, I sing a lot of baritone stuff too (mostly ex-yu rock - since I live there, but some others too). I respect your opinion and I trust it is formulated from quite some experience. This is, however, not about wanting to be a tenor, but about expanding expressive range. Some songs, you want to do higher, some you want to do lower. Every part of one's range that can be used musically is quite valuable, in my opinion. (as I have stated in some thread before). Sooo, how should head voice feel like when doing it?

For example, Geoff Tate from Queensryche is just a basic baritone who has developed an amazing head voice (now he's not as good of course, but in his prime...), and his singing in that area definitely was not sub-par. I mean, the guy was a true image of high singing at the time! So it is obviously achievable, at least in some cases, to do it. Though I have gained some singing experience already, I am still far from a trained singer, and I am always looking for extra little bits that will help me along the way. I hope this can provide me with potent additions to my kit, but then I'll need to learn to do it, and I hope I explained myself a bit better.

Last edited by Navi_96 : 02-14-2014 at 12:31 PM.
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