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Old 06-09-2014, 04:41 PM   #1
flashsplat
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Question Sheet music: what's the best instrument for lead guitar?

Hey guys, this may sound like a silly question but here's why I ask..

I was recently given an electric guitar (a half decent one too as it turns out!). I'm trying to learn but I'd really only ever play with the band at church (My dad plays Rhythm guitar, my brother the flute, and my mom the piano. I run the soundboard :P). I'm trying to learn to play lead guitar.

If I buy some sheet music to go along with what they play (They use 'The Celebration Hymnal'), which instrument accompaniment would be my best bet? I just want the melody. When I look at my moms music it has notes all over the place. My dad plays by ear / chords and doesn't know much about lead guitar.

Any ideas? Does that even make sense lol?

I've been practicing alot, and I like to practice on songs I think i'll play in the future. I like playing by tabs, but hope to eventually be able to read the music and play.

Any help is appreciated.

Thanks,
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Old 06-09-2014, 04:53 PM   #2
staxxxmcgee
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So you want sheet music to play guitar, but you're confused by piano sheet music? I'd say buy a book of "fake" music (not sure if they make them for religious music =) or see if anybody has "tabbed" out the music youre looking for....other than that, get comfortable reading piano sheet, guitar isnt much easier.....
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Old 06-09-2014, 05:11 PM   #3
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Not sure what you are looking for.
Best instrument? Electric guitar
Best tool for learning lead guitar parts to the songs you play? UG tabs and Youtube.
Best way to learn to read music? Music classes.
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Old 06-09-2014, 05:19 PM   #4
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Well, for instance, I look at her music and it has the bass clef and the treble (I assume I play the trebel). But it also has like 2-3 notes stacked ontop of each other.

Do I just go for the lower note?

I geuss what I was wondering is, if I got music written for trumpet, they can obviously only play 1 note at a time so i figured it would be easier.

Thats funny you said "Electric Guitar :P"

I actually found an app that writes tabs for that particular hymmn book but they want $350 and don't even include all the songs 0.o

And I certainly do need to brush up on my music theory :/
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Old 06-09-2014, 05:24 PM   #5
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.. Also, it seems as if her music it written in 4 part harmony and all I want is to look at the melody :/
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Old 06-09-2014, 05:28 PM   #6
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Top note is the melody 90% of the time.
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Old 06-09-2014, 06:08 PM   #7
bassalloverthe
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You wont get much help on this here OP as most people on MT cant read scores or piano parts

You want any alto or soprano instrument that reads in C. Flute is your best bet. Trumpet is next, but make sure its in C, not Bb. Violin works amazingly, but its likely to have double stops, which you said you wanted to avoid. If you can read bass clef, cello parts are also a good way to go. After that, just try to find soprano or alto vocal parts

^nope, especially not in hymns or chorales
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Old 06-09-2014, 08:06 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bassalloverthe
try to find soprano


Quote:
Originally Posted by bassalloverthr
^nope, especially not in hymns or chorales


Hmmmmmmm...

Yeah, sometimes the melody will be in an inner voice but the "dumb soprano" stereotype (the kind that can only sing the melody) comes from somewhere. Most the time sopranos do have the melody, but whatever.

Ts. People sing along to the music while you play right? What music are they reading from? Doesn't your church already have hymnals/sheet music for the congregation?
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Old 06-09-2014, 08:24 PM   #9
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For the most part you can just use the hymnal they use and just read the highest voice. If a note doesn't sound quite right, choose another one stacked vertically with it.

Last edited by Vlasco : 06-09-2014 at 08:26 PM.
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Old 06-09-2014, 09:02 PM   #10
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Here is some recent Praise and Worship music that can be found at our church. You may not find this one in your hymnal though.
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Old 06-09-2014, 09:09 PM   #11
Sean0913
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flashsplat
Hey guys, this may sound like a silly question but here's why I ask..

I was recently given an electric guitar (a half decent one too as it turns out!). I'm trying to learn but I'd really only ever play with the band at church (My dad plays Rhythm guitar, my brother the flute, and my mom the piano. I run the soundboard :P). I'm trying to learn to play lead guitar.

If I buy some sheet music to go along with what they play (They use 'The Celebration Hymnal'), which instrument accompaniment would be my best bet? I just want the melody. When I look at my moms music it has notes all over the place. My dad plays by ear / chords and doesn't know much about lead guitar.

Any ideas? Does that even make sense lol?

I've been practicing alot, and I like to practice on songs I think i'll play in the future. I like playing by tabs, but hope to eventually be able to read the music and play.

Any help is appreciated.

Thanks,


Is there a single line of sheet music where there are only single notes? That's usually the vocal line. If there are stacked notes those are chords and occasionally harmonies.

Church music can be difficult to play if you never have because chords can change on a beat multiple times, which on pano, no sweat, but on guitar, it can be a challenge.

What exactly are you looking to do on the guitar at your church?

Best,

Sean
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Old 06-09-2014, 10:03 PM   #12
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Lead guitar is not usually played when other melodies are happening - there's a reason most worship music is just G C D chord stuff. If you want to take a "solo" verse that's nice and easy for the audience, then learn the vocal melodies. But as a guitarist, your job really is rhythm like 90% of the time.

4 part music is not going to arrange well for "lead guitar". It's just not the right instrument for it.

I might suggest something a bit outside what you're asking: bone up on your chords/scales so you can work melodically as a rhythm guitarist. Players like Jimi Hendrix do a great job of incorporating a melodic component to their chord playing, so it's interesting, but doesn't interfere with the vocal melody.
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Old 06-10-2014, 10:40 AM   #13
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Ok great. Thanks for the information fellas.

We use "The Celebration Hymnal" at church and it is available in different instruments. I wanted to get my own book and want to know which 'instrument' would be closest to what I should be playing as the lead guitar. They don't offer electric guitar :P

My brother, playing flute actually takes the lead most of the time and he's very good. We have a bass player and a rhythm guitarist already.

I don't really plan to take any solo's any time soon. I just want to play along with the band and to me, playing notes is actually easier than chords.
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Old 06-10-2014, 10:48 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cdgraves
Lead guitar is not usually played when other melodies are happening - there's a reason most worship music is just G C D chord stuff. If you want to take a "solo" verse that's nice and easy for the audience, then learn the vocal melodies. But as a guitarist, your job really is rhythm like 90% of the time.

4 part music is not going to arrange well for "lead guitar". It's just not the right instrument for it.

I might suggest something a bit outside what you're asking: bone up on your chords/scales so you can work melodically as a rhythm guitarist. Players like Jimi Hendrix do a great job of incorporating a melodic component to their chord playing, so it's interesting, but doesn't interfere with the vocal melody.


This, I've been playing in worship bands for 6 years as a electric guitarist, anytime you inject a solid lead guitarist into it, it just destroys the worship aspect of it. Learn to harmonize in your rhythm playing and it will open so many doors of playing rather than just lead guitarist wanking.
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Old 06-10-2014, 11:38 AM   #15
bassalloverthe
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Originally Posted by Duaneclapdrix
Hmmmmmmm...

Yeah, sometimes the melody will be in an inner voice but the "dumb soprano" stereotype (the kind that can only sing the melody) comes from somewhere. Most the time sopranos do have the melody, but whatever.

Ts. People sing along to the music while you play right? What music are they reading from? Doesn't your church already have hymnals/sheet music for the congregation?


What I said was sopranoe or alto
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Old 06-10-2014, 02:33 PM   #16
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I've been looking at some "Church Electric Guitar" stuff on the youtube. It does seem that most just harmonize and don't really take a lead role. Still sound amazing though.

Watching some of it was kind of depressing. Looked crazy difficult lol.
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Old 06-11-2014, 12:08 PM   #17
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If there are two guitarists, just plan your parts. Play different chord voicings and make sure you sound good together - maybe the other guy wants to play distorted guitar and you could play clean or the other way around. Play long chords and the other guitarist plays arpeggios. Or just play the same part - it does make the sound bigger. Do whatever works for the song.
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Old 06-11-2014, 12:37 PM   #18
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Hillsong, Bethel live, Kim Walker and Phil Wickham youtube vids should give you a good clue as to contemporary Christian lead guitar styles.
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Old 06-11-2014, 08:40 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggaraMarine
If there are two guitarists, just plan your parts. Play different chord voicings and make sure you sound good together - maybe the other guy wants to play distorted guitar and you could play clean or the other way around. Play long chords and the other guitarist plays arpeggios. Or just play the same part - it does make the sound bigger. Do whatever works for the song.


I'd second this. Learn the higher up chord voicings and just arpeggiate them. Having one guitar strum and the other arpeggiate is a pretty standard way of filling out the sound with two guitars.

Single-note accompaniment belongs to woodwinds and bowed strings, those instruments are literally made for it. Percussive instruments like guitar and piano lack the sustain and timbre to make lead lines sound good as accompaniment. From a practical standpoint "lead guitar" is unfortunately a very useless skill by itself.

As a guitarist, you will get so much more from learning your chords than by trying to shoehorn melodic leads where they don't fit. I would just take on the challenge of working through chords, it's by far the best way to be useful as a guitarist.
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Old 06-11-2014, 10:12 PM   #20
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Hey FlashSplat, I too play in a worship group, and as has been said, most of the time you are playing chords, with a little fill here and there.

The vocalists are the forefront, and the band supports them so they sound good. Saying that I have followed along the melody of a songs with the vocalists in a chorus. I was able to add a vibrato to the long notes that blended with the voices and filled them out. If you have a a half decent guitar and technique, sustain shouldn't be much of an issue.

As for scores, I follow the hymnal chart. Some of the passing chords I'll skip over as they can be a bit quick to make, plus the keys players will get them.

If your dad is already playing the chords, you could look at playing accent notes and inversions to fill out the chord sound. Get some time under your fingers, and it'll grow from there. Most of all have fun making some joyful noise
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