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Old 01-12-2007, 11:03 AM   #1
elvenkindje
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Music Theory FAQ Guide.

The faq is under construction, thread is closed. For discussing, sharing ideas, solving little things, let me know at http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/foru...376#post7899376 or pm me about it.

THIS THREAD IS CREATED TO SOLVE THE NUMEROUS SIMILAR THREADS THAT KEEP ASKING THE SAME QUESTIONS. IF YOU ASK QUESTIONS ABOUT SOMETHING COVERED IN THIS FAQ, WE WILL REDIRECT YOU TO HERE. IF I'M IN A BAD MOOD, YOU GET WARNED. IF YOU READ THE FAQ AND DON'T GET IT, SAY SO IN THE THREAD YOU CREATE. THANK YOU.

CONTENTS

SCALES AND USAGE
Major scale + modes
More on how to use modes
Pentatonics
How to use modes of the major scale together with the minor pentatonic
Modal Pentatonics
Diminished scales
Further modes
Harmonies
Melody + harmony
How do you write your solo
What scale to use for (genre/band)

ALL ABOUT CHORDS
Guide to chord formation
What chords are in what key and why?
What key is a chord progression in?
Theory behind chord progressions
Circle of fifths
Cadences
Extended chords
Chord inversions

VOCALS & LYRICS
Vocal Performing Techniques
Singing & Playing
How to write lyrics

GUITAR TECHNIQUE
Anchoring
The 21 day theory speed improvement (by overriding habits)
Warming up

BLUES
How to play blues
Outside notes in blues
Minor Blues
Blues substitution

JAZZ, IMPROVISING AND NEW IDEAS
Improvising and what to pay attention to
How do you practice improvising?
Some general info on jazz improvising
Outside playing in jazz
Weird ideas
More pentatonic ideas
Improv Tips and Tricks
Song Analysis

Time signatures
Counterpoint
About metronomes
Finding a balance in musical study

THE BIZ
Self Releasing an Album
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Last edited by bluesrocker101 : 07-17-2008 at 04:42 PM.
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Old 01-12-2007, 11:14 AM   #2
elvenkindje
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SCALES AND USAGE
Major scale + modes

Hey! This little lesson here is just about some major scale formation

Music is based off of the major scale. As you can probably tell, it is important to know. The major scale follows a basic series of whole steps (two frets on guitar) and half steps (one fret on the guitar). Using these intervals off of a certain starting point, we can find the major scale! It is made up of seven notes and it follows this pattern: Whole Whole Half Whole Whole Whole Half (WWHWWWH). So, let's form a major scale! Let's do C Major first, since it has no sharps or flats:

C is the root note (the note you start building the scale off of)
One whole step (two frets) from C is D
One whole from D is E
One half step (one fret) from E is F
One whole step from F is G
One whole step from G is A
One whole step from A is B
And one half step from B is C (our starting note).

So the notes in C major are C D E F G A and B.

So...each of these scale degrees has a special name, describing it's function in the scale. I'll use C major for the following examples.

C, the first note, is the tonic.
D, the second note, is the supertonic.
E, the third note, is the mediant.
F, the fourth note, is the subdominant.
G, the fifth note, is the dominant.
A, the sixth note, is the submediant.
B, the seventh note, is the leading tone.

Let's try two more:

G major!

G-W-A-W-B-H-C-W-D-W-E-W-F#-H-G

G major is: G A B C D E and F# .

F major!

F-W-G-W-A-H-Bb-W-C-W-D-WE-H-F

F major is: F G A Bb C D and E.

Wait a minute...why do you write G major with an F# and not a Gb? Likewise, why can't you write F major using an A# instead of a Bb? Those sets of notes are enharmonic (same pitch, but different functions and names), right? So why can't you use those notes? The answer lies in the type of scale that the major scale is. It's a diatonic scale, which, in short, means that when you write the scale, you can only use one of each letter note.

A B C D E F G. You can modify those notes, but you can only use one of each letter if the scale is diatonic (and the major scale happens to be ) It is also neater. Which seems neater? F G A A# C D E, or F G A Bb C D E?

Anyways, here is the major scale in all keys:

Natural Key
C major: C D E F G A B

Sharp Keys
G major: G A B C D E F# G
D major: D E F# G A B C#
A major: A B C# D E F# G#
E major: E F# G# A B C# D#

Enharmonic Keys
B/Cb major: B C# D# E F# G# A# / Cb Db Eb Fb Gb Ab Bb
F#/Gb major: F# G# A# B C# D# E# / Gb Ab Bb Cb Db Eb F
C#/Db major: C# D# E# F# G# A# B# / Db Eb F Gb Ab Bb C

Flat Keys
Ab major: Ab Bb C Db Eb F G
Eb major: Eb F G Ab Bb C D
Bb major: Bb C D Eb F G A
F major: F G A Bb C D E


THE MODES OF THE MAJOR SCALE
Hello there! This lesson deals with the basics of modes, such as formation and a little explanation. This lesson does not go into the application of modes.

What is a mode in the major scale? Well, each note of a major scale can be a starting point for a new scale called a mode. Let's find the modes with the parent scale of C major:

C Ionian (another name for the major scale)
D Dorian
E Phrygian
F Lydian
G Mixolydian
A Aeolian (another name for the minor scale)
B Locrian

This order of modes is the same in every major key (Ionian is always first, Dorian next, and so on).

Now, each of these modes contain the same notes as its parent scale, in this case, C major. So, D Dorian, for example, is D E F G A B C. Notice how D functions as the root note, not C. The thing to remember that many people get confused about when learning about modes is that none of these modes are in the key of C! They share the same notes as C major, but they are not in the key of C major. D Dorian is a D scale with minor tonality, and its root note is D. The same idea goes for the other modes.

Now, you might be wondering, what makes modes so special if they share the same notes as their parent scale? What makes E Phrygian any different from C Ionian? List time

-Well, the intervals that make up the scales are one difference.
Here are each modes formula's in relation to their major scales.

Ionian: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Dorian: 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7
Phrygian: 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
Lydian: 1 2 3 #4 5 6 7
Mixolydian: 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7
Aeolian: 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
Locrian: 1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7

-The note's functions is another difference. In C Ionian, C is the root, D is the supertonic; In D Dorian, D is the root, E is the supertonic, etc..

The sound each mode gives off if used over the "right" chords is another. Modes give off their unique feel when used over certain chords.

Assuming that you have an idea of what chords are in what keys, let's look at C major and see what modes "match up" with each chord. Using C major as an example, let's list C major's chords in roman numerals, followed by the notes in C major, followed by its chord in the key, and finally followed by the mode that matches.

C C major Ionian
D D minor Dorian
E E minor Phrygian
F F major Lydian
G G major Mixolydian
A A minor Aeolian
B diminished Locrian

Generally speaking, some chords that Ionian gives off its unique sound over are major, maj7, and maj6 chords, Dorian with minor, m7 and m6 chords, Phrygian with m7b9 and susb9 chords, Lydian with maj7#11 chords, Mixolydian with dominant and sus chords, Aeolian with m7b13 chords, and Locrian with m7b5 chords.

Credit goes to kirbyrocknroll.

More on how to use modes
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/foru...ead.php?t=16999
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/foru...ad.php?t=187159

Pentatonics
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/foru...ead.php?t=17872

How to use modes of the major scale together with the minor pentatonic

Ok, I'll be assuming you are familiar with the seven different modes. I mean, If you weren't then you wouldn't be here, right?
In any case, I won't go too in depth with modes right now, but I will tab out their shapes to facilitate my explanation later on.
Code:
Ionian |R|-|o|-|o| |-|-|o|-|o| |-|o|o|-|o| |-|o|R|-|o| |o|-|o|-|o| |R|-|o|-|o| Dorian |R|-|o|o|-| |o|-|o|o|-| |o|-|o|-|-| |o|-|R|-|o| |o|-|o|-|o| |R|-|o|o|-| Phrygian |R|o|-|o| |o|o|-|o| |o|-|o|-| |o|-|R|o| |o|-|o|o| |R|o|-|o| Lydian |R|-|o|-|o| |o|-|o|-|o| |-|o|-|o|-| |-|o|R|-|o| |-|o|o|-|o| |R|-|o|-|o| Mixolydian |R|-|o|-|o| |o|-|o|o|-| |-|o|o|-|-| |o|-|R|-|o| |o|-|o|-|o| |R|-|o|-|o| Aeolian |R|-|o|o|-| |o|o|-|o|-| |o|-|o|-|-| |o|-|R|-|o| |o|-|o|o|-| |R|-|o|o|-| Locrian |R|o|-|o| |-|o|-|o| |o|-|o|o| |o|-|R|o| |o|o|-|o| |R|o|-|o|

Ok now to get to the point.
One thing I've found out while soloing is that you can use the minor pentatonic and the major scale modes at the same time. I mean you could start soloing with the minor scale (aeolian) for instance and then start some licks from the minor pentatonic. Different pentatonic box shapes work with different modes. I've figured out which modes work with what. Before I can reveal that to you however, lets have a minor review at the minor pentatonic box shapes:

Code:
Figure 1 |o|-|-|o| |o|-|-|o| |o|-|o|-| |o|-|o|-| |o|-|o|-| |o|-|-|o| Figure 2 |-|o|-|o| |-|o|-|o| |o|-|o|-| |o|-|-|o| |o|-|-|o| |-|o|-|o| Figure 3 |-|o|-|o|-| |-|o|-|-|o| |o|-|-|o|-| |-|o|-|o|-| |-|o|-|o|-| |-|o|-|o|-| Figure 4 |o|-|-|o| |-|o|-|o| |o|-|o|-| |o|-|o|-| |o|-|-|o| |o|-|-|o| Figure 5 |-|o|-|o| |-|o|-|o| |o|-|-|o| |o|-|-|o| |-|o|-|o| |-|o|-|o|

Refreshed? Good. Now for the list:
Code:
Mode |Figure/shape it works with --------------------------------------------------------- Ionian |3 Dorian |3 with the first half, 4 with the second half Phrygian |4 Lydian |5 Mixolydian|5 with the first half, 1 with the second half Aeolian |1 Locrian |2

What I mean is by what goes with what is. for instance:
If you were playing this:
Code:
3 4 5 6 7 <--- These are the fret numbers. |o|-|o|o|-| |o|o|-|o|-| |o|-|o|-|-| |o|-|o|-|o| |o|-|o|o|-| |o|-|o|o|-|

Then at the same time, you could play this:
Code:
3 4 5 6 |o|-|-|o| |o|-|-|o| |o|-|o|-| |o|-|o|-| |o|-|o|-| |o|-|-|o|

See, if you look at the First scale closely, which is the Aeolian mode, you would see that minor pentatonic box fits directly inside it, using the same notes.
Code:
3 4 5 6 7 |o|-|o|o|-| |o|o|-|o|-| |o|-|o|-|-| |o|-|o|-|o| |o|-|o|o|-| |o|-|o|o|-|


Most of em are straightforward, the only ones that might give you trouble are Ionian and Mixolydian. There is no set minor box for them since they are inbetween modes. Look at the modes next to them and thats how you'll know what to use.

Now, you have the what, the where, and the how. However, you must be wondering about the other two: when and why.
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Old 01-12-2007, 11:19 AM   #3
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Well the why part is simple. Mixing between the two scales gives you new sound, less boring music, better soloing...and, it might possibly give you the ability to surprise people with your soloing. It makes it less predictable.

For instance, lets say you start running up the minor pentatonic. We've all heard it before, you build your way up with some fast hammer ons and pull offs, until you get to the top of the scale and go into a Kirk Hammett-esque lick type thing. Well, you could start off that way, and instead of the Kirk Hammett thing (im not bashing it btw because it sounds great, it's just overused) you go into an aeolian/locrian lick.

Some bands who excel at doing this are: Iron Maiden, Paul Gilbert, Santana...

Conversely, you can do what Iron Maiden do alot and start off with a semi-slow aeolian lick at the top and as they move down they go into a faster minor pentatonic h-o p-o thing.

The when however....is something you have to decide. The when is concerned more with phrasing than actual mixing of the scales. Phrasing is extremely important in soloing and is something you have to consider while you use this technique. However, that is something you won't learn from me.

Credit goes to NovemberRain273.

Modal Pentatonics
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/foru...ad.php?t=298378

Diminished scales
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/foru...ead.php?t=21657

Further modes
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/foru...ead.php?t=26618

Harmonies
So, you want to learn about the musical device known as harmony. What is harmony? You should have listened to at least one song, and then realized the
vocal(s), guitar, and bass were playing different notes. If you havenít, then youíre either not attentive or listening to Nirvana too long.

A chord is a combination of at least three different notes - the notes may be doubled in different octaves, eg, the bass playing a low E, and the guitarist playing a higher E G and B is still an E minor chord. It doesnít matter what kind of chord it is, whether open, barre or anything. So how is it that different notes can produce such a sound?

Each skeleton note, called a root note, is a 0. Now, the notes above and below the root are called intervals. Each interval and root pairing has a unique tone quality that separates it from any other, due to intervallic harmonies and stabilities.

If you can find a piano or keyboard, try playing two white notes beside each other. On guitar, fret the third fret on the low E string and open A. Play them
as though they were power chords. This wonít work for all note combinations, because of keys and such. (Key of A, B, C, D, E, F, G, etc.)

That is a second interval chord. Sounds bad, doesnít it? Thatís because itís known as an instable note. Keep that term in mind for this lesson. Instable
notes can sound good when used briefly, but are horrible to listen to as an ending note to a phrase or song, or so.

Now, just remember one thing: If itís one note away from the root, itís a second interval. If itís two, itís a third. It keeps going on and on, although
most people will stop at the eighth interval, the octave. (Play any open note, and then fret 12 for an example of an octave) You heard me mentioning stable
and instable notes before, and now youíd want to know what they are. Donít lie. =)

A stable note combination is simply ones that sound good for either short or extended amounts of time. The stable notes are root and interval 3 (From
here on out, referred to interval numbers), 5, and sometimes 8.

An instable note, on the other hand, is one you donít want to listen to for very long, unless youíre going for a metal head/grunge/kill the audienceís ears
thing. The instable notes are 2, 4, 6, and 7. Seven is considered the most instable note. Power chords and barre chords use stable fifth interval notes. Other
intervals are used, but not as commonly as fifths. Most vocal/instrumental harmonies also use fifths. Vocal thirds can be heard on some live performances of
ďNobody Likes YouĒ, from Homecoming of Green Dayís American Idiot.

You can use harmonies to create, wellÖ harmonies in your music, creating an overall more pleasurable sound that your listeners will like.

Credit goes to MusicalMinority.

Melody + harmony
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/foru...ad.php?t=220138

How do you write your solo
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/foru...ad.php?t=222346

What scale to use for (genre/band)
Hi everyone,

I wrote this tutorial a little while back when I was teaching guitar at a music school. I will eventually give more tutorials. This one is a short explanation of the seven modes with some descriptions and chord progressions to play against.

Keep Learning and having fun.


Ionian Mode

Description
The Ionian Mode is the scale you get when you play one octave up from the first note of a major scale. This mode has the same step-pattern as the major scale, which means, C Ionian is also the C major scale. This mode has a naturally occurring dominant fifth chord, which indicates the fifth note G (in C Ionian) can be used as a dominant chord; i.e. G7. This pure and happy sounding mode can be heard in nursery rhymes such as Twinkle Twinkle Little Star and I?m a Little Tea Pot.

Quality
Happy, Merry, Upbeat, Cheerful

Music Styles
Rock, Country, Jazz, Fusion, Folk Songs, Nursery Rhymes

Tonic Chords
Unaltered major chords; i.e. C, C6, Cmaj7, Cmaj9, C6/9, Cadd9, Cmaj13

Improvising
Try the C Ionian over this chord progression: C, F, G7, C


Dorian Mode

Description
The Dorian Mode is the scale you get when you play one octave up from the second note of a major scale. D Dorian starts on the second note of the C major scale. Dorian is a minor sounding mode, which, is commonly used in Jazz, Blues and Irish folk songs. This mode can be heard in the folk song Scarborough Fair and the timeless classic Eleanor Rigby by the Beatles. The Dorian Mode differs from the major scale because it has a flat 3rd (b3) and a flat 7th note (b7).

Quality
Jazzy, Soulful, Sophisticated

Music Styles
Jazz, Blues, Fusion, Rock

Tonic Chords
Unaltered minor chords; i.e. Dm, Dm6, Dm7, Dm7sus4, Dm9, Dm11, Dm13

Improvising
Try the D Dorian over this chord progression: Dm7, Fmaj7, Cmaj7, Em7


Phrygian Mode

Description
The Phrygian Mode is the scale you get when you play one octave up from the third note of a major scale. E Phrygian starts on the third note of the C major scale. This sad, exotic sounding mode is often found in Spanish, Hebrew and Gypsy music. Robert Plant from Led Zeppelin used this mode in his song Calling to you and the great Miles Davis featured this mode extensively in his inspiring album Sketches of Spain. The Phrygian Mode differs from the major scale because it has a flat 2nd (b2), a flat 3rd (b3), a flat 6th (b6) and a flat 7th note (b7).

Quality
Spanish, Exotic, Dark

Music Styles
Flamenco, Fusion, Speed Metal

Tonic Chords
Minor chords; i.e. Em, Em7, Em7b9, Em11, Esusb9

Improvising
Try the E Phrygian over this chord progression: Em, Fmaj7, Em7, Am7


Lydian Mode

Description
The Lydian Mode is the scale you get when you play one octave up from the fourth note of a major scale. F Lydian starts on the fourth note of the C major scale. Compared to the major scale, the fourth step of the Lydian Mode may sound a little strange; however, this sharpened fourth note (#4) is what gives this mode its modern and uplifting tonality. The theme songs from the popular TV cartoons The Simpsons and The Jetsons are both based on the Lydian Mode.

Quality
Airy, Hollow, Light

Music Styles
Jazz, Fusion, Country, Rock

Tonic Chords
Major chords; i.e. F, F6, Fmaj7, Fmaj7#11, Fadd9, Fmaj9, Fmaj13

Improvising
Try the F Lydian over this chord progression: Fmaj9, Cmaj7, Bm7b5, Cmaj7


Mixolydian Mode

Description
The Mixolydian Mode is the scale you get when you play one octave up from the fifth note of a major scale. G Mixolydian starts on the fifth note of the C major scale. The Mixolydian is also known as the dominant 7th scale because it is suited to dominant 7th chords. Blues guitarists like the great B.B. King, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Santana and Eric Clapton have often used this mode in their songs. Norwegian Wood by the Beatles is based on this mode. The Mixolydian Mode differs from the major scale because it has a flat 7th note (b7). This is why it sounds Bluesy and Mellow.

Quality
Bluesy, Mellow

Music Styles
Blues, Country, Rock, Rockabilly

Tonic Chords
Unaltered dominant chords; i.e. G7, G7sus4, G9, G11, G13

Improvising
Try the G Mixolydian over this chord progression: G7, Cmaj7, Dm7, Am7


Aeolian Mode

Description
The Aeolian Mode is the scale you get when you play one octave up from the sixth note of a major scale. A Aeolian starts on the sixth note of the C major scale. This sad sounding mode is also known as the relative or natural minor scale and is often found in Pop and Rock songs. The solo in Stairway to Heaven by Jimmy Page from Led Zeppelin is in this mode. The Aeolian Mode differs from the major scale because it has a flat 3rd (b3), a flat 6th (b6) and a flat 7th note (b7).

Quality
Sad, Sorrowful

Music Styles
Pop, Rock, Blues, Heavy Metal, Fusion, Country, Classical

Tonic Chords
Minor chords; i.e. Am, Am7, Am7sus4, Am add9, Am9, Am11, Am7b13

Improvising
Try the A Aeolian over this chord progression: Am, C, G, Em
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Old 01-12-2007, 11:34 AM   #4
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Locrian Mode

Description
The Locrian Mode is the scale you get when you play one octave up from the seventh note of a major scale. B Locrian starts on the seventh note of the C major scale. This strange sounding mode is very unstable, due to the fact it has a flat 5th note (b5) in its scale. The half-diminished seventh chord (m7b5) suits this mode, however, you?ll find this mode is rarely used at all. Sad but True by Metallica has a Locrian feel in the main riff. The Locrian Mode differs from the major scale because it has a flat 2nd (b2), a flat 3rd (b3), a flat 5th (b5), a flat 6th (b6) and a flat 7th note (b7).

Quality
Sinister, Anxious, Haunting

Music Styles
Jazz, Fusion, Dark Metal

Tonic Chords
Diminished triad or Half-diminished chords; i.e. Bmb5, Bm7b5

Improvising
Try the B Locrian over this chord progression: Bm7b5, Am7, F, C


I hope you enjoyed the tutorial.

Damo


`
Keep practising to develop skills, study to gain knowledge and most importantly,
keep on writing and jammin' those tunes to develop the creative side.

Credit goes to Damo: http://www.jordie.com.au

ALL ABOUT CHORDS
Guide to chord formation
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/less..._formation.html

What chords are in what key and why?
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/less...ey_and_why.html
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/foru...ad.php?t=525227

What key is a chord progression in?
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/foru...ad.php?t=229763

Theory behind chord progressions
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/foru...ad.php?t=394618

Circle of fifths
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/foru...threadid=196305

Cadences
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/foru...ad.php?t=227146

Extended chords
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/foru...ad.php?t=111417

Chord inversions
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/foru...ead.php?t=33818
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/foru...ad.php?t=394618

VOCALS & LYRICS
Vocal Performing Techniques
Introduction

This lesson focuses on aspects of a vocal performance that can make it a much more enjoyable/intense/relaxing experience for the listener and the audience. It is the equivalent of listening to a blues guitarist playing his soul out and a shred guitarist playing technically perfectly. One will connect more with you as a person and you emotionally whereas the other will be enjoyable to listen to as they sound good but maybe not have the same impact on you.

Dynamics

A performance with roughly the same volume level will sound flat. Flat is two dimensional and lifeless. We cannot hold these objects so they never "come to life". We want to feel and see what it is you're singing about - so bring it to life with dynamics. How you put them into a song is your choice. It could be a line, it could be a verse, it could be a single word. Do it in the right places and it can work wonders.

Whilst this article is about vocal performance - the same applies to every instrument in the band, if the vocals drop or rise in volume then the band should do the same. There are gradual rises in volume called crescendos and gradual drops in volume called diminuendos. This can be particularly effective in a song to make a point or explicitly emphasize the emotion, whether it's a huge climax ( eg. anger ) or a fade out effect ( eg. helpless ).

Speed

The slightest pause before a verse or a word can be very effective. In this case it could show how the singer is struggling to make the words come out. Making certain lines faster can give the impression of the singer being crazy or angry. And again, you want to put as much as you can into making the point or emphasizing the feeling portrayed in the song.
Making notes longer is called augmentation, making notes shorter is called diminution. This can be an effective way of repeating a chorus/verse without it seeming too repetitive. It can also add more energy if the chorus is played once and then played again faster and you get the opposite effect if it is slowed down the second time, again depending on what effect you want.

Repetition

A contradiction of myself? Repetition is good to hammer a point home. This could be repeating a line, or verse/chorus to make the point clear as day. This can be used to create the effect that this point is always on your mind, that you are a slightly demented soul that won't let go. Sometimes if used correctly and with slight variation ( eg. played a step higher ) it can be a great way of getting your hook or chorus in there again without seeming too repetitive and boring. This again, depends on what effect you are looking for.

Tone

Singing in a rough/breathy tone can give your song a certain effect. It could even be switching between a couple of these timbres that gives your song that lift. A mellow verse that tells the story and perhaps a rough chorus to make the point? You could hardly sing at all but instead speak the lyrics and this could show that you are trying to reason or speak to somebody in the song. Again it all depends on what effect you are looking for and what is appropriate for the song you have picked.

Pitch

At certain notes your voice may break and sound weak and waver if you don't supply it with enough air. This can be great to show a vulnerable side to the singer. A higher voice is generally associated with being light and pure and angelic ( falsetto especially ), with a deeper voice generally associated with being big and evil and ntimidating. These are generalizations and are not meant to be hard and fast rules but try shifting the vocal line a bit and see how it sounds. This is called modulation ( singing in a different key ).

Lyrics

Adding in a word like "yeah", or a "oh" can add to a song and give the impression that the singer is restless or sad depending on the delivery of the line. Also think about how the lyrics sound. Some words sound harsher
than others. Getting the right amount of soft and hard words is hard but worth trying when it comes to writing your own songs. When it's a cover you should only change the odd few words for effect, however subtle they seem. The correct amount of plosives and other word types can help heaps, and can make a song gentle or aggressive.
.Credit to Sir_Edwin_CBE.


Singing & Playing
So you have a guitar and what you consider to be a decent voice. Now youíre asking yourself what you are going to do with these 2 things. Well, youíve come to the right place. Here I will explain a few techniques that you can use to master singing and playing at the same time.

I am going to start with the guitar aspect of these 2 things. When singing while playing guitar, you are mostly playing chords or a simple riff. Not many people can shred guitar and sing at the same time, so donít expect to do that. In fact, sometimes when playing live, Eric Clapton himself plays chords when he sings even though he is capable of playing anything out there.

So now you have all these chords figured out. Now the key is to be able to strum without singing first. You should figure out how the rhythm of the strumming goes along with the song. If you are doing a cover song, play with the recording. If it is an original song, then just play those chords.
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Old 01-12-2007, 11:38 AM   #5
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Now if you have the strumming part down pat, and you can do it in your sleep, try to sing the song you are doing without playing guitar. Now same with the guitar part, if you are doing a cover song, sing along with that. If it is original, try singing it just solo. You should have the words memorized by this point. By having the words memorized, you donít have to
really pay attention to them anymore. Also, have the dynamics of the song down if there are any. Dynamics are really what make a song all the better.

By this point, you have the guitar chords memorized, and your lyrics to the song are basically memorized. Now they donít have to be all perfect, as you are going to sing and play some more when putting it together. So it will come all together in the end. However, itís good to have an idea of what you are doing. Now for this part there are 2 methods that I will recommend when putting it all together.

-Method 1 - Sing through the song 1 full time, just singing, then for the second time through, play each chord once whenever it is said to be played. With doing this, you will get a feel for playing and singing at the same time. This method works mostly on the voice, but adds the chords for a good feel of the song and how it should be. Once you do this a few times, you
are likely ready to add the strumming to the mix. If you canít get all the way through the song, then look at what you are doing wrong, and make adjustments. Whether this be just going over the chords again, or the singing. The key is to take this slow when you are just learning how to sing and play at the same time.

-Method 2 - Play the song through just strumming just the chords. Then next time through, itís easiest to just hum the words so you get a good feel of the song and the tune. You can do this several times if needed, or just a few until you get the feel of the song. From there, you can go all out with strumming and singing.

These are only 2 methods that I find work quite well. There are obviously many more and you can mix it up to get the maximum benefit. For more experienced singers, I recommend method 1. For more experienced guitar plays, I recommend method 2.

So now that you are able to sing and strum the guitar at the same time. Congratulations on that first off. Not many people are capable of doing his. So now you wonder what you can do with this. Well you must play of course. Now here are a few bands/artists that I have picked out that are perfect for not only practicing playing and singing at the same time, but that are perfect for playing regularly.

-Coldplay
-The Beatles
-Foo Fighters
-Jack Johnson
-John Frusciante
-Oasis
-City and Colour
-Our Lady Peace
-Sam Roberts
-Matt Costa

These people are just a few of the tons of artists out there. There is no limit to what songs you can play. Often times you can play to stuff like Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd if you can find the chords for it. Also, for those of you that are involved with church, there are limitless things you can do. Playing worship music is about the best way to practice singing and playing as you know how the song goes already. Itís just a matter of plugging it all in.

So look around for what style you are into, and donít be afraid to let your voice free. Thatís what this is all about. Just letting go of all your inhibitions and singing and play guitar for the joy of not only yourself, but for people around you as well. You are opening a whole new world of music to yourself so all the best with it!

Credit goes to justin_fraser.

How to write lyrics
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Technique Thread
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Anchoring
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The 21 day theory speed improvement (by overriding habits)
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BLUES
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Outside notes in blues
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Improv Tips and Tricks
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Song Analysis
SoTM: Autumn Leaves.
SoTM: Blue Bossa.

Time signatures
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/foru...ead.php?t=16336

Counterpoint
http://www.listeningarts.com/music/...pecies/menu.htm

About metronomes
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Finding a balance in musical study
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THE BIZ
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