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Old 05-29-2007, 08:18 AM   #1
edg
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Three Note Per String Primer

All in once place. I'm going to follow up this post with the following:

1) The 7 three note per string fingers for G Diatonic Major
2) The 7 three note per string fingers for G Melodic Minor
3) The 7 three note per string fingers for G Harmonic Minor
4) How to easily find, build and play 7th arpeggios in three note per string fingerings.

And a bonus pak:

5) Pentatonic 3 note per string basics

The last is really a separate issue, but fits into the 3 theme.

I like to use the key of G for my practice stuff. I assume you can easily transpose
if you like other keys.


Here's #1

Code:
G Diatonic Major E A G D B E | | | | | | o o | | | | 3<--- 3rd fret G Major | | o o | | 4 o o o o o o 5 | | | | | | 6 o o o o o o 7 | | | | o o 8 | | | | | | 9 E A G D B E | | | | | | o o o o | | 5 | | | | | | 6 o o o o o o 7 o | | | o o 8 | o o o | | 9 | | | | o o 10 | | | | | | E A G D B E | | | | | | o o o o | | 7 o | | | o o 8 | o o o | | 9 o o o | o o 10 | | | o | | 11 | | | | o o 12 | | | | | | E A G D B E | | | | | | o | | | | | 8 | o o o | | 9 o o o | o o 10 | | | o | | 11 o o o o o o 12 | | | | o | 13 | | | | | o 14 E A G D B E | | | | | | o o o | | | 10 | | | o | | 11 o o o o o o 12 | | | | o | 13 o o o o | o 14 | | | | o o 15 | | | | | | E A G D B E | | | | | | o o o o | | 12 | | | | o | 13 o o o o | o 14 o o | | o o 15 | | o o | | 16 | | | | o o 17 | | | | | | E A G D B E | | | | | | o o o o | | 14 o o | | o o 15 | | o o | | 16 o o o o o o 17 | | | | | | 18 | | | | o o 19 | | | | | |
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Old 05-29-2007, 08:19 AM   #2
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Code:
G Melodic Minor E A G D B E | | | | | | o o | o | | 3 | | o | | | 4 o o o o o o 5 o | | | | o 6 | o o o o | 7 | | | | o o 8 | | | | | | E A G D B E | | | | | | o o o o | | 5 o | | | | o 6 | o o o o | 7 o | o | o o 8 | o | o | | 9 | | | | o o 10 | | | | | | E A G D B E | | | | | | o | | | | | 6 | o o o | | 7 o | o | o o 8 | o | o | | 9 o o o | o o 10 | | | o o | 11 | | | | | o 12 E A G D B E | | | | | | o | o | | | 8 | o | o | | 9 o o o | o o 10 | | | o o | 11 o o o o | o 12 | | | | o | 13 | | | | | o 14 E A G D B E | | | | | | o o o | | | 10 | | | o o | 11 o o o o | o 12 | o | | o | 13 o | o o | o 14 | | | | o o 15 | | | | | | E A G D B E | | | | | | o o o o | | 12 | o | | o | 13 o | o o | o 14 o o | o o o 15 | | o | | | 16 | | | | o o 17 | | | | | | E A G D B E | | | | | | | o | | | | 13 o | o o | | 14 o o | o o o 15 | | o | | | 16 o o o o o o 17 | | | | | o 18 | | | | o | 19
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Old 05-29-2007, 08:20 AM   #3
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Code:
G Harmonic Minor E A G D B E | | | | | | | | | | | | o o | o | | 3 | | o | o | 4 o o o o | o 5 o o | | | o 6 | | o o o | 7 | | | | o o 8 E A G D B E | | | | | | o o o o | | 5 o o | | | o 6 | | o o o | 7 o | o o o o 8 | o | | | | 9 | | | | o o 10 | | | | | | E A G D B E | | | | | | o o | | | | 6 | | o o | | 7 o | o o o o 8 | o | | | | 9 o o o | o o 10 | | | o o o 11 | | | | | | E A G D B E | | | | | | o | o o | | 8 | o | | | | 9 o o o | o o 10 o | | o o o 11 | o o o | | 12 | | | | o | 13 | | | | | o 14 | | | | | | E A G D B E | | | | | | o o o | | | 10 o | | o o o 11 | o o o | | 12 | o o | o | 13 o | | o | o 14 | | | | o o 15 | | | | | | E A G D B E | | | | | | o | | | | | 11 | o o o | | 12 | o o | o | 13 o | | o | o 14 o o | o o o 15 | | o | o | 16 | | | | | o 17 E A G D B E | | | | | | | o o | | | 13 o | | o | | 14 o o | o o o 15 | | o | o | 16 o o o o | o 17 | | | | | o 18 | | | | o | 19
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Old 05-29-2007, 08:21 AM   #4
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You can take any 3 note per string fingering
and generalize it into a "schematic":


Code:
E A G D B E | | | | | | O O O O O O | | | | | | O O O O O O | | | | | | O O O O O O | | | | | |


Just to visualize, here's an example
of what I'd call the 1st position fingering.
Starting on 3rd fret, low E, this is
the G Major scale, actual fingering.



Code:
E A G D B E | | | | | | o o | | | | <--- 3rd fret G Major | | o o | | o o o o o o | | | | | | o o o o o o | | | | o o | | | | | |


Back to the schematic, we could number the
scale degrees like so:


Code:
E A G D B E | | | | | | 1 4 7 3 6 2 | | | | | | 2 5 1 4 7 3 | | | | | | 3 6 2 5 1 4 | | | | | | and in the actual fingering: E A G D B E | | | | | | 1 4 | | | | <--- 3rd fret G Major | | 7 3 | | 2 5 1 4 6 2 | | | | | | 3 6 2 5 7 3 | | | | 1 4 | | | | | |



This is the basis for how I chose to
number the 7 arpeggio 7th patterns. The
7 patterns are numbered for where the
root of each sequentially falls in the
first fingering position.


So, in schematic form, here are the
7 patterns. The ONLY 7 patterns you'd need
to memorize for any 7th arpeggio anywhere:


Code:
E A G D B E | | | | | | R | X X | | | | | | | | | X X | X X Pattern 1 | | | | | | X | | X X | | | | | | | E A G D B E | | | | | | | X | | X X | | | | | | R | X X | | Pattern 2 | | | | | | | X X | X X | | | | | | E A G D B E | | | | | | | | X X | X | | | | | | X X | | X X Pattern 3 | | | | | | R | X X | | | | | | | | E A G D B E | | | | | | X R | X X | | | | | | | | | X X | X Pattern 4 | | | | | | X X | | X X | | | | | | E A G D B E | | | | | | | X X | | X | | | | | | X R | X X | Pattern 5 | | | | | | | | X X | X | | | | | | E A G D B E | | | | | | X | | X X | | | | | | | | X X | | X Pattern 6 | | | | | | X R | X X | | | | | | | E A G D B E | | | | | | | X R | X X | | | | | | X | | X X | Pattern 7 | | | | | | | X X | | X | | | | | |



In the first fingering position

1 = Gmaj7
2 = Amin7
3 = Bmin7
4 = Cmaj7
5 = D7
6 = Emin7
7 = F#minb5

What happens when you move up a fingering
position? Same schematic patterns, but
they give you different arpeggios:

1 = Amin7
2 = Bmin7
3 = Cmaj7
4 = D7
5 = Emin7
6 = F#minb5
7 = Gmaj7

Just pop the top one off, move it to the bottom
and renumber from 1 - 7.


And so on up through the other 5 finger positions.


What happens, if you want to, for instance, play
Gmaj7 up the entire neck? Simple, the patterns
would go (starting from the 1st position):

1 ->7 ->6 ->5 ->4 ->3 ->2 ->1


Same thing works for Melodic & Harmonic minors.

Here's G Melodic minor, 1st position:


Code:
| | | | | | | | | | | | o o | o | | | | o | | | o o o o o o o | | | | o | o o o o | | | | | o o | | | | | |


And here's the pattern arpeggios

1 = Gminmaj7
2 = Amin7
3 = Baug
4 = C7
5 = D7
6 = Emin7b5
7 = F#minb5


[CODE]
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Old 05-29-2007, 08:22 AM   #5
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I was inspired to write this based on a fairly recent argument
I had in this forum. It's about economy picking pentatonic scales.
I said that the typical pentatonic "boxes" aren't condusive to
economy picking because of thier 2 note per string nature. The
other side argued it was just as easy to economy pick those as
alt pick those and suggested I didn't understand economy picking.
Idiots(just kidding)! But, of course I'm right and they're wrong.

However, there IS a way to totally economy pick pent scales. You just
can't use the usual "boxes". You have to think outside the "box" (har-har).

I've included examples AND sound clips of each example on my dmusic site.
(my examples may not be all that great as I'm still actively working on
this stuff).

As far as I know, this idea originated with Frank Gambale. At least
it's the first I heard of it. A big advantage of the "three note per
string" major scale fingering is that it's very easy to follow the
golden rule of economy picking: "odd number of notes picked to move
in the same direction, even to reverse direction" What Gambale
essentially did was "paste" 2 adjacent pentatonic boxes in a
super-position and that makes a 3 note per string fingering. The
disadvantage is you have to be comfortable with some BIG stretches, but
that is pretty easy to overcome with the right practice. The advantage
is with this regular picking you can smoothly fly through a pentatonic
scale.

Here is the totally typical Linear Gambale pentatonic run. You'll notice
EVERY SINGLE string crossing is economy picked -- that's what I'm talking about!
It's in G Minor Pentatonic (as are all the tabs):



http://edg.dmusic.com/music/ Example 1
Code:
EX 1 "Gambale" Linear pent -----------36----------------- ----------6--6---------------- -------357----753------------- ------5----------5------------ ---358------------853--------- -36------------------63------- UDDUDDDUDDDUUUDUUUDUUD


You'll note he's actually doing 3 string sweeps, but the principle
is the same. It follows the "odd economy picking rule" about moving
in the same direction. In this case the odd number is 1.

It may not be obvious the underlying scheme is pasting 2 pent
boxes together. This example might make it clearer. It's
another typical Gambale pattern and is the oft-used "4 note
braid":


http://edg.dmusic.com/music/ Example 2
Code:
EX 2 "Gambale" Pent 4 note braid --------------------------------3--- ------------------------3--36--6---- ----------------3--35--5-35--57----- --------3--35--5-35--58------------- ---35--5-35--58---------------------- -36--68------------------------------ UDDUUDDDUDDUUDDDUDDUUDDDUDDUUDDD



OK, so why is the basic linear pattern not
simply like a three note per string major
scale? Well, here's why. The next example
shows what it would be like (and makes the
2 pasted positions even clearer). Try it
out.


http://edg.dmusic.com/music/ Example 3
Code:
Ex 3 Three note Per String Pent ----------------368---------------- -------------368------------------- ----------357---------------------- -------358------------------------- ----358---------------------------- -368------------------------------- DUDDUDDUDDUDDUDDUD


Did you notice that the last note of one string
is the same as the first of the next? You get
a kind of percussive doubling. Played at speed,
it's totally cool! However, it's not always
desired.

This is where I came up with an idea. Maybe it's
been done before, but I never heard about it.

If you do BOTH 3 notes per string AND moving
diagnonally through the finger positions, you totally
can linearly economy pick the pentatonic scale that
way too.

Here's an example of what I'm talking about. This
is basically one out of five diagonals:


http://edg.dmusic.com/music/ Example 4
Code:
Ex 4 Three note per string Diag --------------------------------15 18 20--- ------------------------13-15-18----------- ----------------10 12 15------------------- ---------8 10 12--------------------------- ----58 10---------------------------------- -368--------------------------------------- DUDDu DD U D D U D D U D D U D



That covers a LOT of ground quickly! Starting on
fret 3, you wind up at fret 20! But it can be
done and done fast and smoothly.

However, you can still use the diagonal approach
and build smaller repeating pieces of it. Here's
an example:


http://edg.dmusic.com/music/ Example 5
Code:
Ex 5 Diag repeating pattern ------------------------ ------------------------ ------------------------ -----35----------------- --135--853--1.....------ -3--------63------------ DDUDDUUDUUDD.....



I'll leave it at that then. Between the Gambale approach
and the diagonal approach you should be able to come up
with lots of interesting new pentatonic patterns and
ideas. I've only scratched the surface here. Plus,
the examples mostly only show one out of five positions
or diagonals. To be the most useful, these should be
worked out in every position so you can cover the entire
fretboard.
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Old 05-29-2007, 09:07 AM   #6
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I like the patterns again, but have you considered trying more mode-specific chords in your arpeggio lines?

What I mean is - for the major scale, instead of going maj7 - m7 - m7 - maj7 - 7 - m7 - m7b5, you might go maj7 - m7 - susb9 - maj7#11 - 7 - m7b13 - m7b5, where each arpeggio more closely outlines the tonality of the scale, and IMO it leaves a wider space for any lines you want to throw over a arpeggiated sequence because you don't have to work as hard to establish some kind of home for the ear (especially if you use quartal voicings) because the notes you're using in the arpeggios are doing that for you.

You can do the same thing with melodic minor aswell, instead of m/maj7 - m7 - aug - 7 - 7 - m7b5 - minb5 (which btw is the incorrect label for the 7th chord of mel minor, the mode contains a major third turning it into a dominant chord) you would go along the lines of m/maj7 - susb9 - maj7#5 - 7#11 - alt - m7b5 (only 6 chords there, the reason being the alt chord usually comes from a different scale and is used instead of the actual V chord in your specific key to add more inherent tension, Galt from Ab melodic minor in the key of C instead of G7 from C melodic minor). So you'd have a line like Dsusb9 - G7alt - Cm/maj7 instead of Dmin - G7 - Cm/maj7, which I think opens up more melodic doors. You can then proceed to add/substitute chords (using the 7#11 chord a tritone away from the V for example), something along the lines of Dsusb9 - Db7#11 - Cm/maj7.

That's just something for you to think about if/when you decide you want to expand on your arpeggio ideas, and I find is a lot more interesting than straight up tertian chords.

Still loving those Gamable 3nps penta licks though, even if I have been slacking on them. Getting there though

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Old 05-29-2007, 11:38 AM   #7
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Yeah, good catch, the 7th chord of the melodic minor is dominant.

This is really just the briefest of intros to anyone who's interested in 3 note
per string scales. The arpeggiated stuff is the basic way anyone should understand
how a scale harmonizes. I didn't want it to turn it into anything more complex
than that. The reason I happen to be doing this is that I think it's a very useful
way of patternizing the fretboard. I'm basically a pattern player I guess. I know
many many patterns through these fingerings as they're pretty easy to do up
and down the entire fretboard once you've done a few. You can get a wide
variety of color tones or chord tones out of the same simple pattern all depending
what chord you use it over. To do that effectively its also good to be aware of how
the tonal center is moving in relation to what you're playing and where you happen
to be on the fretboard. That's where I find these arpeggios useful -- not necessarily
that I'd play them like that. More to help target specific chord tonalities when using
other patterns.
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Old 05-29-2007, 12:00 PM   #8
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I think this is some good stuff, you should submit it as a lesson!
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Old 05-29-2007, 03:42 PM   #9
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Yeah, well I've tried submitting lessons in the past and they seem to just go into
a black hole. So, no more lesson submissions for me....
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Old 05-29-2007, 06:42 PM   #10
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Very good information... but hmm can you tell me what is the G Diatonic Major scale exactly?? I'm not sure I understand....

Is it an other name for the Major Scale?? or its like G Mixolydian (to get only natural notes)??
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Old 05-29-2007, 07:54 PM   #11
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Actually, I should just say the Diatonic scale in the key of G which = G Major.

I don't really like saying G Major because you're naming an entire note system by
its first mode, and right there you get a ton of people confused between scales
and modes. But G Major IS the common way of saying it. So the Diatonic scale
system includes major (ionian) and all the other modes, but it doesn't imply
any specific one, which is a good way to look at when you're just looking at
fretboard patterns.
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Old 05-29-2007, 08:10 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peanut1614
I think this is some good stuff, you should submit it as a lesson!



+ 1
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Old 05-29-2007, 08:12 PM   #13
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^ Okk.. thanks for clarifying!
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Old 05-30-2007, 01:55 AM   #14
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This needs to be archived!
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Old 10-24-2008, 12:45 AM   #15
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^ that can be arranged. *archives*

Quote:
Originally Posted by edg
Yeah, well I've tried submitting lessons in the past and they seem to just go into
a black hole. So, no more lesson submissions for me....


PM me them, I'll edit them into the AT FAQ. Also, try submitting them as columns.
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