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Old Yesterday, 05:06 PM   #1
Controller1337
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Too high tones when playing on first frets

I've been playing guitar for about half a year now and I'm really enjoying it. I'm using a Chevy Stratocaster clone which my daddy bought around 1989. It still looks quite nice after those 25 years but I'm having some problems and I don't know what the cause is or how it could be resolved.
Whenever I play , especially on the G string, the tone sounds a little bit off. You can hear it the most when playing on low frets, for example when playing a E or A major. I went to a guitar shop and asked what the problem could be and they recommended to replace the strings. I got my strings replaced in the same shop and after that, it sounded a little bit better but it still wasn't perfect. What could be the cause of this and how could it be resolved? I've also reintonated the guitar but it hasn't helped much.

Some screens from my amplifier's tuner:
High E (fret 0):

High E (fret 1):

High E (fret 12)


G (fret 0)

G (fret 1)

G (fret 12)
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Old Yesterday, 05:17 PM   #2
DanyFS
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It may be your intonation. What kind of bridge does your guitar has?
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Old Yesterday, 05:33 PM   #3
Tony Done
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Assuming the intonation is correct, minor discrepancies are quite normal., and can depend on how the note is fretted, for example. Some folks go to extraordinary lengths to fix this inherent problem, using compensated nuts and even compensated frets. That only provides a partial fix, and most of us just put up with these discrepancies, and adjust our tuning and playing style to compensate.
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Old Yesterday, 05:49 PM   #4
K33nbl4d3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Done
Assuming the intonation is correct, minor discrepancies are quite normal., and can depend on how the note is fretted, for example. Some folks go to extraordinary lengths to fix this inherent problem, using compensated nuts and even compensated frets. That only provides a partial fix, and most of us just put up with these discrepancies, and adjust our tuning and playing style to compensate.

^This pretty much sums it up. The G and B are generally the worst culprits for sharp first and second frets, and it depends on your playing what you do about it. Some will intonate/tune to make these notes correct at the expense of higher frets if they only play cowboy chords. Some will, as mentioned, use compensated nuts and suchlike. The problem, it's worth pointing out, is much less noticeable with a wound 3rd string. Obviously that brings its own issues.

Truth is guitars are a lump of compromises and you've got to pick which compromises are worth it and which aren't.
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Old Yesterday, 06:37 PM   #5
Paleo Pete
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You could also be fretting too hard. I have a little trouble with a couple of my guitars doing the same thing, and it's not easy to remember to not fret so hard...but I try and it helps. Still not perfect, but better.
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Old Yesterday, 06:51 PM   #6
Robbgnarly
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yeah the A string on my G400 was never right, so I made the the open fret a few cents off but the entire fretboard is now in tune. 1 note for the rest being right is worth the trade out.

A regular guitar will never be truly correctly intonated. Multi-scale are your best bet
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Old Yesterday, 07:39 PM   #7
Guitarpilot
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Throwing my two cents in here.....

Any chance that the nut is too high or that the strings are sitting too high in the nut (ie the wrong size)? Ive read that this can cause the notes to pitch slightly sharp especially when fretting near the nut and would explain why open notes and fretting farther down the neck are not affected.
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Old Yesterday, 10:14 PM   #8
Paleo Pete
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Yes that can happen too, should have thought of it myself...I've seen it a few times...A check of nut slot height wouldn't hurt a thing

http://www.frets.com/FretsPages/pagelist.html

Should be there.
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