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Old Yesterday, 08:12 AM   #1
adelino316
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Les Paul vs Strat for blues.

i love the LP's warm tone because play jazz and rock but i mostly play blues which i also love on the LP but for example can i get like a SRV sound out of it? im worried that i wont be able to get that glassy blues tone which i love but i dont know if i should i get a strat only for that purpose because i hate the sound of it for anything else... that glassy single coil tone for jazz isnt really nice is it? with that said whats the best blues guitar LP or strat?
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Old Yesterday, 12:10 PM   #2
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There are plenty of Blues musicians who play Les Pauls...Joe Bonamassa jumps to mind immediately.

The majority use guitars with single coils, often Teles and Strat but plenty use Semi-Hollows with P90s.

You should be able to get a Bluesy tone out of any guitar you can find. I had a Schecter Damien Elite Solo with EMGs in it and was able to dial in an amazing clean tone.

My favourite Blues guitarist is/was Albert Collins. He used a Telecaster with a Seymour Duncan '59 humbucker in the neck position and a Texas Special single coil in the bridge position.

The Blues is an attitude that really transcends the guitar. Not sure who said this, I think it was BB King...and I am paraphrasing "If you have the Blues...you can play the Blues."
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Old Yesterday, 12:18 PM   #3
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I'd say get a guitar with either two humbuckers that you can coil split, or a HSH pickup configuration, which will get you very nice warm humbucker tones, but also with a nice single coil sound if you need one.

If you do some research you can probably find plenty of cool guitars with these. Personally I have a Schecter C-1 Classic with Seymour Duncan JB/Jazz and two split coil settings on the pickup switch, and it's just an incredibly versatile guitar. I think many PRS models also have a coil split.

I'm in no way an expert on blues, to say the least but based on your description, I think that would be a good solution if you prefer humbucker tones but would like a single coil sound at your disposal if needed.
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Old Yesterday, 01:18 PM   #4
dannyalcatraz
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There are all kinds of guitars used for blues.

The are all kinds of configurations and electronic wiring schemes that make guitars more or less flexible about covering tonal bases.

Most of the blues greats, however? They play something HH if they want HH tones, something with P90s if they want P90 tones, and something SS, HSS or SSS if they want Strat or Tele tones.

Lots of reasons behind this: simplicity, they can afford multiple guitars, tradition, etc.

Personally, I will never be a blues great, but I will usually opt for tonally flexible guitars over specialist ones, these days. Look at Reverends and Godins right now- well-made guitars that have some clever tricks up their sleeves so that a guitarist can cover a LOT of tonal ground with a single axe. You may not sound exactly like a Gibson LP or a Fender Strat when playing one, but most listeners won't notice.
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Old Yesterday, 01:30 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adelino316
but for example can i get like a SRV sound out of it?


Not really, no.
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Old Yesterday, 01:34 PM   #6
dspellman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adelino316
i love the LP's warm tone because play jazz and rock but i mostly play blues which i also love on the LP but for example can i get like a SRV sound out of it?


Buy a Variax then.

Rotate the model selector switch, and you get strat, tele, LP, P90's, Filtertrons, acoustic guitars, resonators, rockabilly type guitars and much more.
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Old Yesterday, 01:46 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adelino316
iwith that said whats the best blues guitar LP or strat?


You should probably extend your search a bit.

There are those who believe that the Gibson LS6 from the 70's remains the best blues guitar ever. It's a solid maple guitar, single cutaway, with a body as thin as an SG's, but without the neck-heavy tendencies.



It's Gibson's first-ever 24-fret guitar, and all 24 are comfortably available, thanks to a set neck that blends pretty easily (no clunky neck heel like an LP or a Strat) into a beveled-edge body that even has a tummy cut. The pickups are also Gibson's first-ever "hot" pickup (about 1.5X more output than a PAF), but the trick is in the design of the EQ system and pickup selector. The pickup selector will pick standard bridge-pickup only and neck-pickup, of course, but adds four options for "both pickups selected" including serial and parallel mode in-phase and serial and parallel mode out-of-phase including a parallel mode out of phase that adds an inductor to the neck pickup to give a completely different sound there. In addition to the standard treble rolloff pot that we call a "tone" pot, there's an additional mids rolloff pot. The combinations available offer some amazing Fenderish qualities that aren't available elsewhere on Fender or Gibson guitars.

This one's mine, in black, with a somewhat rare ebony fretboard. The original pickups did not have screw posts:




Gibson recently reissued the L6S, but in true Gibson fashion, hacked up the electronics and lost a lot of what the L6S is all about. The reissue subs a bass rolloff pot for the mids rolloff, and exchanges the parallel in-and-out-of-phase parallel choices for single coil tap. Still an interesting guitar, it also subs in standard current Gibson humbuckers for the Bill-Lawrence design pickups of the original.

The good news is that the original can actually be found in great shape for less money than the reissue.

Last edited by dspellman : Yesterday at 02:03 PM.
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Old Yesterday, 01:57 PM   #8
dspellman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adelino316
i with that said whats the best blues guitar LP or strat?



You should probably extend your search a bit. No, this isn't a double post.

But you can have the best of both worlds.

The old MIII Gibsons were available as both LP and as superstrat style variants and have a fairly interesting H-S-H setup with a five-way switch, two pots and a mini-switch.

With the miniswitch in "strat" mode, all pickups are set for single coil and the five-way pickup selector operates exactly as it does on a stratocaster. With a 25.5" scale (on the superstrat variant), there's not much to distinguish them except that the Gibson has 24 frets. When you flip the miniswitch into the other position, you get a different set of selections -- neck humbucker/bridge humbucker/both selected and a fourth choice that gives you a "both selected" with an "enhanced" neck position sound. The fifth position in this case is a kill switch.



In Les Paul guise, the controls are exactly the same, but you're working with an LP with a standard 22-fret 24.75" fretboard and the usual clunky neck heel.



Obviously, the same wiring choices can be used on an existing HSH guitar (say, a Carvin HSH DC-145 with a 25" scale, 24-fret board, etc.)
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Old Yesterday, 04:41 PM   #9
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For right now, you really need both.
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Old Yesterday, 09:26 PM   #10
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It's easy to overthink this. Close your eyes and imagine which guitar is most likely to deliver YOUR original Blues tone. Pick that one and don't give what other dudes are playing a second thought. Make your own music, even when playing blues covers, not theirs.
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Old Yesterday, 09:58 PM   #11
dannyalcatraz
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Yes.
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Old Today, 12:50 AM   #12
trashedlostfdup
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tele. i play a lot of blues. i play with a lot of people at blues jams/open mics, and have some people over from time to time.

i have LP's, strats, and teles, but i get *my* favorite blues tone through my 52 RI tele.

LP's and strats have their uses too.

on thing i did (that is free which is always nice) is flip the magnet on the neck pickup on my LP, didn't take long and it is awesome for a more vocal blues tone.

strats are nice too, can't quite hit SRV without one, but its my third pick for a blues guitar

as always, this works for me, maybe not for you.
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Old Today, 06:44 AM   #13
TheLiberation
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cajundaddy
It's easy to overthink this. Close your eyes and imagine which guitar is most likely to deliver YOUR original Blues tone. Pick that one and don't give what other dudes are playing a second thought. Make your own music, even when playing blues covers, not theirs.

Yepyep, I second this - look for a guitar which has tones you like, rather than trying to closely approximate someone else's. If you've already established you prefer humbucker tones, it's pointless to get a guitar with all single coils imo just to approximate someone else's tone.
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Old Today, 08:51 AM   #14
KailM
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If you count "bluesy" rock as blues, then there have been countless famous recordings using either humbuckers or single coils. I don't think you can really say that the genre favors one over the other. Best thing you can do is try lots of different guitars and decide on the one that works best for your playing style. I'd get something that can be coil-split, as that effectively covers both HB and SC sounds.

This may come as a surprise, but my LTD FX260 (Explorer shape) with SD Black Winter pickups can do a phenomenal job playing blues. Not that I'm that great of a blues player or anything, but I know a thing or two. You can make any guitar work for you, pretty much.
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Old Today, 09:08 AM   #15
TheLiberation
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KailM
This may come as a surprise, but my LTD FX260 (Explorer shape) with SD Black Winter pickups can do a phenomenal job playing blues.

Kvlt black metal meeting traditional blues.

WHY DID I NEVER THINK OF THIS
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Old Today, 11:11 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trashedlostfdup
tele.


winner.
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Old Today, 11:33 AM   #17
dannyalcatraz
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A Tele worked for Ralph Macchio in Crossroads...



...of course, Reverend guitars hadn't been invented then.

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Old Today, 11:50 AM   #18
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