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Old 12-05-2012, 10:48 PM   #9181
ryan_nadon
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Find the absolute maximum value for the function f(x)=(x-1)/(x+1) on the interval [0,1]

I know what to do but am I looking for where the maximum is or the y value of it?
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Old 12-05-2012, 10:52 PM   #9182
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y value I believe. If it wanted the X value it would probably ask in terms of critical points.
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Old 12-05-2012, 11:05 PM   #9183
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y value I believe. If it wanted the X value it would probably ask in terms of critical points.

On other questions I am asked to find critical points so that must be it.

Follow up question: Is an inflection point a critical point? For example, in f(x)=x^3 is 0 a critical point since its derivative is zero?
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Old 12-05-2012, 11:23 PM   #9184
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Originally Posted by ryan_nadon
On other questions I am asked to find critical points so that must be it.

Follow up question: Is an inflection point a critical point? For example, in f(x)=x^3 is 0 a critical point since its derivative is zero?

inflection points and critical points are different, but yeah, you use the first derivative test to find a critical point. Inflection points use the second derivative.
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Old 12-09-2012, 12:02 AM   #9185
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I have my final on Monday and I need help with these questions:

1.)When glucose, C6H12O6, is completely oxidized with excess oxygen, what are the products?
and could you please state why.


2.)If gallium, atomic number 31, combines with selenium, atomic number 34, what is the most likely formula based on your knowledge of the periodic nature of elements?

A.) GaSe B.)GaSe2 C.)Ga2Se D.) Ga2Se

I know the answer to the second problem is D...but why?



3.)The species F-, Ne, and Na+ all have the same number of electrons. Which is the predicted order when they are arranged in order of decreasing size (largest first)? and again, please explain why.

Thank you
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Old 12-09-2012, 07:09 AM   #9186
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Quote:
Originally Posted by funkbass369
I have my final on Monday and I need help with these questions:

1.)When glucose, C6H12O6, is completely oxidized with excess oxygen, what are the products?
and could you please state why.
What does complete oxidation involve?

Would, for example, C2H5OH be completely oxidised?


Quote:
2.)If gallium, atomic number 31, combines with selenium, atomic number 34, what is the most likely formula based on your knowledge of the periodic nature of elements?

A.) GaSe B.)GaSe2 C.)Ga2Se D.) Ga2Se

I know the answer to the second problem is D...but why?
What affects the number of atoms of each element in a compound? How do we calculate that from the periodic table?



Quote:
3.)The species F-, Ne, and Na+ all have the same number of electrons. Which is the predicted order when they are arranged in order of decreasing size (largest first)? and again, please explain why.

Thank you
If these atoms all have the same number of electrons, why do they have different names? What's different about them? How does that affect atomic radius?
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Old 12-09-2012, 03:27 PM   #9187
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My calc tests like to ask questions like if this function is a solution to a type of differential equation than is this function a solution as well? In which it usually gives two functions that don't seem to be linear combinations of the other but I'm not sure.

For example one solution is, x1=te^(-t)+4e^(-t)sin(t) then is x2=4e^(4-t)-e^(-t)cos(t) a solution? It says it's a linear homogeneous constant coefficient equation..
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Old 12-09-2012, 04:00 PM   #9188
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrenchyFungus
What does complete oxidation involve?

Would, for example, C2H5OH be completely oxidised?


What affects the number of atoms of each element in a compound? How do we calculate that from the periodic table?



If these atoms all have the same number of electrons, why do they have different names? What's different about them? How does that affect atomic radius?



I think I understand number 3. It has to do with the amount of protons in each atom right? They all have the same amount of electrons so more protons will pull harder on the electrons, making the atom smaller. correct? I still don't understand questions 1 and 2 at all.
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Old 12-09-2012, 04:26 PM   #9189
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Quote:
Originally Posted by funkbass369
I think I understand number 3. It has to do with the amount of protons in each atom right? They all have the same amount of electrons so more protons will pull harder on the electrons, making the atom smaller. correct? I still don't understand questions 1 and 2 at all.


When glucose is oxidized, the oxygen molecule is reduced. In this reaction, one of the O atoms will bind two hydrogens, the other will bind a carbon forming exactly two products: 6CO2 + 6H2O. This is a simplified explanation for a very complex biochemical process (but it's the answer you're going for at this level).

Number two deals with the charges on the ions. What is the most probable charge state of Ga? Of Se? The charge of Ga becomes the number of Se needed, the magnitude of the charge of Se becomes the number of Ga needed. Ga is most likely... 1+, 2+, or 3+? Se is most likely 1-, 2-, 3-?

Number 3 is all about the number of protons. When a series of isoelectronic systems is presented to you, and they ask about size... the system with the fewest protons is largest, the system with the most protons will be smallest. The explanation you provide above is the answer you're looking for at this level (there are simply deeper explanations, the answer doesn't change).
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Old 12-09-2012, 04:50 PM   #9190
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hethamulburton
When glucose is oxidized, the oxygen molecule is reduced. In this reaction, one of the O atoms will bind two hydrogens, the other will bind a carbon forming exactly two products: 6CO2 + 6H2O. This is a simplified explanation for a very complex biochemical process (but it's the answer you're going for at this level).

Number two deals with the charges on the ions. What is the most probable charge state of Ga? Of Se? The charge of Ga becomes the number of Se needed, the magnitude of the charge of Se becomes the number of Ga needed. Ga is most likely... 1+, 2+, or 3+? Se is most likely 1-, 2-, 3-?

Number 3 is all about the number of protons. When a series of isoelectronic systems is presented to you, and they ask about size... the system with the fewest protons is largest, the system with the most protons will be smallest. The explanation you provide above is the answer you're looking for at this level (there are simply deeper explanations, the answer doesn't change).


I still don't understand the second one. Ge has a charge of 4+ doesn't in? since it is in group 4A? and Then Se has a charge of 2-? So wouldn't the answer be GeSe2 instead of Ge2Se?
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Old 12-09-2012, 08:00 PM   #9191
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I'm also having trouble with this problem:

carbon monoxide gas reacts with hydrogen gas at elevated temperatures to form methanol according to this equation:

CO(g)+2H2(g)<--->Ch3OH(g)

When 0.40 mol of CO and .30 mol of H2 are allowed to reach equilibrium in a 1.0 L container, 0.060 mol of CH3COH are formed. What is the value of Kc?

What I did was:

Kc=[CH3OH]/[CO][H2]^2=[0.060]/[0.4][0.3]^2

I got Kc to be 1.7. My ACS exam book says that the answer is 5.4 though.
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Old 12-09-2012, 09:14 PM   #9192
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Quote:
Originally Posted by funkbass369
I still don't understand the second one. Ge has a charge of 4+ doesn't in? since it is in group 4A? and Then Se has a charge of 2-? So wouldn't the answer be GeSe2 instead of Ge2Se?


You were referring to gallium (III) in the original post. Not germanium.

Quote:
Originally Posted by funkbass369
I'm also having trouble with this problem:

carbon monoxide gas reacts with hydrogen gas at elevated temperatures to form methanol according to this equation:

CO(g)+2H2(g)<--->Ch3OH(g)

When 0.40 mol of CO and .30 mol of H2 are allowed to reach equilibrium in a 1.0 L container, 0.060 mol of CH3COH are formed. What is the value of Kc?

What I did was:

Kc=[CH3OH]/[CO][H2]^2=[0.060]/[0.4][0.3]^2

I got Kc to be 1.7. My ACS exam book says that the answer is 5.4 though.


The concentrations of CO and H2 are no longer their initial values if some methanol was formed. Account for that. 0.06 moles of CO and 0.12 moles of H2 were consumed, so subtract these values from the initial ones. Otherwise you have the right idea.
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Old 12-09-2012, 09:28 PM   #9193
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hethamulburton
You were referring to gallium (III) in the original post. Not germanium.



The concentrations of CO and H2 are no longer their initial values if some methanol was formed. Account for that. 0.06 moles of CO and 0.12 moles of H2 were consumed, so subtract these values from the initial ones. Otherwise you have the right idea.



Yeah it was gallium not germanium, my mistake. So Ga is 3+ and Se is 2- right? So then its Ga2Se3. Because you'd need to balance the charges out by multiplying both by 2 to give 6+ or 6-. Thats still not the answer that was given in the book. Its Ga2Se. I'm not seeing how whats the answer.
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Old 12-09-2012, 11:10 PM   #9194
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Quote:
Originally Posted by funkbass369
Yeah it was gallium not germanium, my mistake. So Ga is 3+ and Se is 2- right? So then its Ga2Se3. Because you'd need to balance the charges out by multiplying both by 2 to give 6+ or 6-. Thats still not the answer that was given in the book. Its Ga2Se. I'm not seeing how whats the answer.


Ga is most typically found in the Ga(III) oxidation state, less often in Ga(I) and Ga(II). It would be odd for them to have you rationalize the Ga(I) or Ga(II) products, though they do exist! I suspect you might have a typo in your answers (both C and D are the same).
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Old 12-10-2012, 03:44 PM   #9195
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My calc tests like to ask questions like if this function is a solution to a type of differential equation than is this function a solution as well? In which it usually gives two functions that don't seem to be linear combinations of the other but I'm not sure.

For example one solution is, x1=te^(-t)+4e^(-t)sin(t) then is x2=4e^(4-t)-e^(-t)cos(t) a solution? It says it's a linear homogeneous constant coefficient equation..

Bump?
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Old 12-11-2012, 04:19 AM   #9196
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Bump?


If you type out the exact wording of the question as it was given to you I'll give it a shot.
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Old 12-11-2012, 10:41 AM   #9197
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about: 2-3-4 trees and duplicate keys.

It all looks okay in the 2-3-4 tree, but I noticed something as I was to convert it to a Red-Black-Tree. Take note of the three 'K's inserted into it.

I'll link to the images instead of posting them here.
The 2-3-4 Tree
The Red-Black Tree
(Yes, I used MS Paint. I don't got any fancy stuff to make these figures with)

The problem should speak for itself, but the second 'K' is the left child of a 'K' and the third is a right child of a 'K'. Am I doing something wrongly?

Edit: Oh, forgot to mention that the order of insertion is (from left to right): KAFFEKOPPHANK

Thanks in advance; I hope I made my problem clear.

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Old 12-11-2012, 12:28 PM   #9198
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If you type out the exact wording of the question as it was given to you I'll give it a shot.

If x1=te^(-t)+4e^(-t)sin(t) is a solution to a linear homogeneous constant coefficient equation then x2=4e^(4-t)-e^(-t)cos(t) is also a solution. True or false?

The answer is true

It doesn't even say what order it is or if its even a differential equation but I think we can assume it is.
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Old 12-11-2012, 01:39 PM   #9199
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If x1=te^(-t)+4e^(-t)sin(t) is a solution to a linear homogeneous constant coefficient equation then x2=4e^(4-t)-e^(-t)cos(t) is also a solution. True or false?

The answer is true

It doesn't even say what order it is or if its even a differential equation but I think we can assume it is.


okay note that e^(4-t) = (some constant)*e^-t. Now the only way that t*e^(-t) can solve the ODE is if the characteristic polynomial has a repeated root. If you have a root r with a multiplicity of k, then all of the following functions solve the equation:
e^rt, t*e^(rt), t^2*e^(rt), ... t^(k-1)*e^(rt). So the fact that t*e^(-t) solves the equation implies that e^-t must solve it also.

Then for the second term it will be easiest if you recognize that sin and -cos differ by a constant phase shift. If you express the solution in terms of a complex exponential, you could simply factor the phase out as a complex constant.
ie e^i*(t+phase)= e^(i*phase)*e^(i*t)
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Old 12-11-2012, 05:35 PM   #9200
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Oh so you just deal with the terms separately like that. Sweet thanks
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