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Old 05-07-2015, 04:37 PM   #1
Wolfsblood138
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old school rockabilly blues etc

so for example, if i give the following riff, what scale is this derived from, and how did they come up with this, and why does most old rock and roll or rockabilly seem to use this, like what is it


D--------------------------2-4-5-4-2-------------------------------
A-----2-4-5-4-2----0-4---------------4---------2-4-5-4---------
E 0-4-------------4-------------------------0-4-------------2b2-0
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Old 05-07-2015, 05:24 PM   #2
theogonia777
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It's sort of a 7th chord type thing. 1, 3, 5, 6, b7. First in E and then in A.
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Old 05-08-2015, 01:39 AM   #3
MaggaraMarine
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Yeah, it's a "riff" you can play over 7th chords. In this case your progression would be E7 A7 E7.

Notice how the open E string, the 4th fret of E string, the 2nd fret of A string and the 5th fret of A string form an E7 chord (E G# B D). The 4th fret of A string is just a passing tone.

D--------------------
A-----2-4-5-4-2----
E 0-4-------------4-
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Old 05-08-2015, 07:14 AM   #4
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The 6 has always been a common passing tone on the 7th chord like that, particularly in blues but also ragtime, bluegrass, rock n roll, etc.

Also this doesn't really matter, but the intervals in semi tones betweeneach note are 4, 3, 2, 1. That's kind of neat.
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Old 05-08-2015, 03:19 PM   #5
Wolfsblood138
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Thanks guys, I understand it now. I'm not good at theory, but when the one person pointed it out that it contained notes from the E7 chord, it started to make sense. I've always been sort of a 80s metal guy (Iron Maiden, Metallica, Sabbath, Priest etc) and in recent years I've been branching out into less distorted territory lol and picking up more old school rock and roll, rockabilly, and country and now I feel like I gotta relearn guitar since the approach is a lot different.
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Old 05-09-2015, 07:42 PM   #6
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D--------------------------2-4-5-4-2-------------------------------
A-----2-4-5-4-2----0-4---------------4---------2-4-5-4---------
E 0-4-------------4-------------------------0-4-------------2b2-0
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In analysis, I try and get as much information about the song, including melody, chords, bassline etc. I also take what I know already about that genre, and use that to frame my initial ideas.

For example If I know the basics of a 12 bar blues, and I understand a quick change to the IV, then my analysis of a blues solo is going to listen for chord tones over the IV change. Makes sense, right?

But the only thing I know about your post is that it's Rockabilly and the notes of this riff. So I have to have some outside knowledge to make assumptions about where this was played and the likely chords that incorporated this.

So let's look at your lick, but I'm going to convert these into musical notes, and see what emerges.

So I see an open E followed by a G#

Immediately, I'm "alerted" that the odds that this is in the key of Em are almost none. I've just eliminated the idea that it's in Em in just 2 notes. How?

Because if you have the ability to instantly name the notes of any chord, then you will know when a scale shows those similarities.

I know that The notes of an E Major chord are E G# B...

Did you see that? E G#...

That's how I eliminated Em from the key, and now, I'm thinking E major, and now I've mentally "mapped" the likely chords to expect in E major, which I can do instantly

E F#m G#m A B C#m D#o

Instantly, I am expecting this to be in E - I'm going to eliminate the D#o because that's not going to be a common chord in most songs. However a bVII is common, so I'll expect a possible D which signals to me that I have a bVII - easy enough, right?

Now I have an instant set of possibilities as I run this analysis...and that's only 2 notes of your riff. Pretty cool.

So As we run this, Lets just list the notes of an E major scale: E F# G# A B C# D# E

There we go, now lets look at the riff, and see how many fit that scale:

E G# B C# D C# B

See that D? I knew to expect it...so there's my b7. Ah, what kind of E major has a b7? E7!

Now I have more to go on, I'm most likely dealing with an E7 chord. And, if not, the riff is strongly suggesting an E7 to E6 move. Very common in blues, which as I said, takes from what I already know about that genre.

Looking at the D string now: E F# G...that G is...curious to me.

That G is not in E major. So, does this indicate a chord change? Possibly. What are the two chords that it most likely might change to?

The IV or V. So this might have gone to the A or B. If it went to A then we have A C# E G - G would be the b7, so maybe the chords, changed to an A7 and the lick indicated that.

But would G F# and E, work over that A7? It turns out, yes. G would be the b7, F# would be a 6 and E is in the A7 chord (as the 5th). So these are very consistent to an A7.

So, in reading the rest of these notes, the only "different" note from those I've names is the F#. I see that this chord progression might be a I IV I (E7 - A7 - E7) over this lick, and the analysis I listed above, led me to this as a possibility..

Best,

Sean

Last edited by Sean0913 : 05-09-2015 at 07:45 PM.
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Old 05-13-2015, 03:32 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wolfsblood138
Thanks guys, I understand it now. I'm not good at theory, but when the one person pointed it out that it contained notes from the E7 chord, it started to make sense. I've always been sort of a 80s metal guy (Iron Maiden, Metallica, Sabbath, Priest etc) and in recent years I've been branching out into less distorted territory lol and picking up more old school rock and roll, rockabilly, and country and now I feel like I gotta relearn guitar since the approach is a lot different.


Check out Brian Setzer and Stray Cats - He's the best rockabilly player out there and he has an aggressive soloing style that can get pretty technical . See:

Rock this Town (studio version) - amazing guitar work
Rumble in Brighton (studio version) - great solo
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