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Old 10-10-2014, 12:57 PM   #1
SirSixString
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Random chord sequence for ear training

I'm doing ear training and want to practice intonating and analyzing the different notes of a chord.

I want to hear a random chord, analyse it, and then get to know which chord it was. An app would be great, but maybe also some way to synthesize it or some youtube video.
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Old 10-10-2014, 03:41 PM   #2
MaggaraMarine
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What do you mean by "analyzing the different notes of a chord"? Do you mean that you try to figure out whether it's a major or minor chord or something else and you also figure out the intervals in the chord or what?
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Old 10-10-2014, 03:43 PM   #3
Elintasokas
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I do this every day in Practica Musica. Harmonic and melodic dictation (basically transcribing melodies)

This website also has that.

http://www.teoria.com/exercises/pd.php
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Old 10-12-2014, 08:12 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elintasokas
I do this every day in Practica Musica. Harmonic and melodic dictation (basically transcribing melodies)

This website also has that.

http://www.teoria.com/exercises/pd.php


haha, thats a cool site
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Old 10-13-2014, 11:18 AM   #5
SirSixString
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MaggaraMarine: Yeah that, and if it's inverted, diminished etc.
Elintasokas: Great exercise! Basically what I was looking for.
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Old 10-13-2014, 09:42 PM   #6
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I second Elintasokas- that is a great site with all sorts of wonderful resources. Where would you say you are currently at in your ear training? I find that the most helpful way of getting to identify intervals and chords is by knowing the quality of them and being able to pick that out. Another really useful thing is knowing where it will resolve. For example, a dominant 7th will sound a certain way (I'd say it's a pretty harmonious sound, one of the less dissonant of the 7th chords- less bright than the major 7th chord and but brighter than the minor 7th) and will want to resolve one way- two if we count tritone substitutions, and a diminished 7th chord another way (much more crunchy, less open), which will want to resolve another way altogether- 8 ways depending on where you are resolving to, I believe.
Knowing what you are looking for in terms of listening, as well as just practicing, is the most efficient way of getting to where you want to be, at least I have found this to be the case.
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Old 10-14-2014, 06:21 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elintasokas
I do this every day in Practica Musica. Harmonic and melodic dictation (basically transcribing melodies)

This website also has that.

http://www.teoria.com/exercises/pd.php

Looks like a good exercise.

I was going to tell TS that the context of the chords is important but yeah, that site puts the chords in context.

I mean, in music there's always a context. For example a diminished chord resolves to a chord a semitone higher most of the time. You don't really need to be able to hear what a diminished chord sounds like out of context. Because they are never used out of context.
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Old 10-14-2014, 11:06 AM   #8
Elintasokas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggaraMarine
Looks like a good exercise.

I was going to tell TS that the context of the chords is important but yeah, that site puts the chords in context.

I mean, in music there's always a context. For example a diminished chord resolves to a chord a semitone higher most of the time. You don't really need to be able to hear what a diminished chord sounds like out of context. Because they are never used out of context.

They are sometimes, though. You sometimes hear passages that only uses diminished chords (that don't resolve to minor or major chords) Gives a really chaotic feel.
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Last edited by Elintasokas : 10-14-2014 at 11:14 AM.
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Old 10-14-2014, 11:30 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggaraMarine
Looks like a good exercise.

I was going to tell TS that the context of the chords is important but yeah, that site puts the chords in context.

I mean, in music there's always a context. For example a diminished chord resolves to a chord a semitone higher most of the time. You don't really need to be able to hear what a diminished chord sounds like out of context. Because they are never used out of context.


I agree with you, that context is important, and in progressions, the diminished chord is often used as you say, but in improvising, diminished chords are more free than that, I find. It's actually quite common, in jazz mostly, to do dim7 runs, rotating the root. And I think it is good to be able to recognize that sound. But really want you want, is to recognize IV, not so much major chord. But still, major chord sounds like major chord.

I agree with you also that non contextual ear training exercises are not all that useful, for me anyway. It's not something I would recommend. Even contextual like this is not the greatest, because you are learning one thing by ear, then separately one thing on the fretboard, and you have to connect them, rather than doing ear exercises on the guitar. But this sort of exercise I think is still good for a bit of training. It could still be improved I think though. and a guitar version of the 3 major roots I think would be cool also.
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Old 10-14-2014, 11:36 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fingrpikingood
But I agree that for me, non contextual ear training exercises are not all that useful. It's not something I would recommend. Even contextual like this is not the greatest, because you are learning one thing by ear, the separately one thing on the fretboard, and you have to connect them, rather than doing ear exercises on the guitar. But this sort of exercise I think is still good for a bit of training. It could still be improved I think though. and a guitar version of the 3 major roots I think would be cool also.

Well, I kinda disagree. Non-contextual ear training is also useful. Sometimes it's easier to listen for intervals rather than scale degrees. Depends on the situation.

The main problem I have with this site is that you can't pause and start from for instance chord 3. You have to re-listen the whole sequence many times unless you're godlike at it.
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Last edited by Elintasokas : 10-14-2014 at 11:38 AM.
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Old 10-14-2014, 12:44 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elintasokas
Well, I kinda disagree. Non-contextual ear training is also useful. Sometimes it's easier to listen for intervals rather than scale degrees. Depends on the situation.


Ya, different strokes for different folks.

For me, the character of a chord or a tone is more dependent on its position relative to the tonic. I don't necessarily think of it in degrees, more just where it is on the guitar, but I'm very "key oriented" in how I play. Not trapped diatonically, but a key relative mindset. I don't tend to put too much emphasis on names of degrees so much. That's why I never change the names of degrees when I switch mode. Like, Major, for me, is I-ii-iii-IV-V-vi-viio, and minor is, vi-viio-I-ii-iii-IV-V. My approach is a very relative one. I don't really concern myself with what key it is, or what mode it is, what chord is playing, what degree it is, or anything like that. I just need to know where the pattern is, the rest is just how I feel like playing it, or notes outside of it.

For me, an interval is just a shape on the guitar. It doesn't really have a name, if you know what I mean. It's kind of a subliminal thing. I just need to know where "the pattern" is, and I can hit the notes I want most of the time. It is too many steps for me to hear it, name it, then find the thing with that name on the fretboard. I just hear it, and know that shape. It's like that for piano for me also. I never really spent any time on intervals. Those to me, are only really useful in so far as chord nomenclature is concerned. Which I do find important. It's an area I wish I was stronger in also. I think it can be useful to have more absolute awareness than I employ, like what the name of the chord I just played is, sort of thing. But that's not really something ear training could really help me with. Not in absolute intervals, nor absolute chords, really, since for me the character the chord gets from its relative position to the key, overwhelms its absolute character.

For me piano and guitar are the key, the diatonic triads of it, and the rest relative to that. Even chords are just sets of notes from or relative to the key.

But sometimes there is a bit more to it, like secondary dominants, for example.

I find it is more important to practice that a 5th is one string up, and 2 frets over, that it is, the sound of a fifth. You'll the sound from playing, all mixed in with key relative sound as well. It will be subliminal, and easy. knowing the pattern's name can help know chord names, which can help you play inversions, which can let you make big jumps that are too large to be able to assimilate the relative pattern subliminally.

That's how it is for me, at this point. Maybe I would see more advantages to absolute ear training if I took the time to practice it, but at this point other things seem more pressing to me.
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Last edited by fingrpikingood : 10-14-2014 at 12:51 PM.
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Old 10-14-2014, 12:57 PM   #12
Elintasokas
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^ Hmm, that's a fine approach, I guess.

I used to do the same. At one point, though, I got annoyed of how instrumentally dependent I was. I couldn't figure out a melody or chord progression without trial & erroring it with either my guitar or piano. Now, thanks to (a lot of) ear training, I am easily able to do that.

In fact, I don't even like playing instruments. I just want to compose orchestral music. Piano is just a tool for testing melodies and stuff for me.
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Last edited by Elintasokas : 10-14-2014 at 01:04 PM.
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