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Old 06-16-2015, 02:23 PM   #1
liampje
Wannabe music theorist :)
 
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Practicing sight reading.

I want to devote my summer break to become a sight reader. The best sight reader I can possibly become in 2 months.

I'd most likely want to be reading jazz/rock/classical music composed for guitar.

I want a book that covers a lot of stuff preferably not just sight reading but also a bit of theory, so I can analyze a sheet of music the proper way.

At the end of the book I want to know what all the slurs, bows, ties, dots etc. means in any composition ever written on sheet. Now that's a big goal for just 2 months, I know. The first 2 months might be just a starter or something.

So a book that teaches how to read music and has several jazz/rock/classical pieces to practice and that also teaches music theory.

Any recommendations?
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Old 06-16-2015, 03:36 PM   #2
GoldenGuitar
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If you want to get good at sight reading, find as much notated music as you can and just read. Go on imslp, there will be heaps of stuff there available for download. Also try to specifically read in different positions on the guitar, as that is one of the difficulties of the instrument. Do one voice if reading multi-voice stuff, then move on to two voices, then three etc.
Also, you'll never know what everything means because no one knows.
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Old 06-16-2015, 04:40 PM   #3
liampje
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenGuitar
If you want to get good at sight reading, find as much notated music as you can and just read. Go on imslp, there will be heaps of stuff there available for download. Also try to specifically read in different positions on the guitar, as that is one of the difficulties of the instrument. Do one voice if reading multi-voice stuff, then move on to two voices, then three etc.
Also, you'll never know what everything means because no one knows.

It was meant as a hyperbole. But I guess I need some easy stuff to play/read before I do some hard stuff. And imslp doesn't categorize in easy/hard.
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Old 06-16-2015, 04:52 PM   #4
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step 1: get music you haven't played before
step 2: play it
step 3: repeat steps 1 and 2
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Old 06-16-2015, 07:45 PM   #5
Sean0913
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Music Reading for Guitar - David Oakes.

It's going to take you a lot longer than 2 months. But go for it.

If you want a more exhaustive, then get started on Modern Method for the Guitar - Berklee.

Best,

Sean
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Old 06-16-2015, 10:06 PM   #6
cdgraves
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There are ton of sight reading books out there. Get one, read it cover to cover (including the table of contents and introduction), and follow its directions meticulously. You will lose the benefit of sight reading exercises if you start memorizing stuff or re-start stuff. And set the metronome slow your first time through the book. Like, painfully slow.

Since your goals are bigger than just reading, I also suggest getting a general theory book that includes actual theory, not just "guitar theory". If you have a keyboard, you'll want to dust it off to get the most from a theory text.

A year from now, if you can hack your way through a short 4 part texture, you'll have a better grasp on music theory and history than 99% of guitarists. If you're in college, you should see if a first year Music Theory class is available, since it will go over everything you're interested in, except sight reading.

It's really just so valuable to have a solid traditional theory foundation to apply your creativity to.

Last edited by cdgraves : 06-16-2015 at 10:13 PM.
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Old 06-17-2015, 01:13 AM   #7
Elintasokas
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You will want to read intervals + note names, not just note names. It's way faster to read 5 notes up than A B C D E separately. Or an A minor triad instead of A C E, etc. Of course if there is a big jump, it makes more sense to read just the note name than a 13th or something.

But as I said, you should combine interval reading (you'll get better and faster at spotting intervals, chords and inversions with practice) with note name reading, not get stuck on either.
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Old 06-17-2015, 07:10 AM   #8
liampje
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cdgraves
If you're in college, you should see if a first year Music Theory class is available, since it will go over everything you're interested in, except sight reading.

Haha, I wish it worked that way in the Netherlands. I asked a local music school if they had a music theory course and that I was willing to pay for it. The only thing they offered were minors for senior students, but I already want to do something else in my minor. I think I can get just as good with just a little bit more time. :P
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Old 06-17-2015, 12:09 PM   #9
Jet Penguin
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+1 to Sean.

Modern Method will make you a BEAST at sight reading. It's the primary reason that Leavitt wrote it.
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Old 06-17-2015, 02:20 PM   #10
liampje
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jet Penguin
+1 to Sean.

Modern Method will make you a BEAST at sight reading. It's the primary reason that Leavitt wrote it.

Great, then my decision has been made.

Thanks guys!
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