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Old 12-13-2014, 09:23 PM   #1
guitardork97
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Triad question

What would you call a major triad with a flat five? For example- C, E, F#
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Old 12-13-2014, 11:28 PM   #2
Jet Penguin
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That isn't a tertian triad because you have a Major third and then a major second/diminished third.

Assuming you mean C - E - Gb, there isn't a name for it.

So we have two basic options:

1. Add another "theoretical note" based on context, then name it, making the sonority some form of Master chord.

2. Call it non-tertian harmony and don't name it. The chord is a simultaneity and has no meaningful name.

You could name a C E Gb chord and call it a Major minor third chord, notated as C (b5) but this is unnecessarily confusing and does nothing to explain the sound.

Edit: Chris how the HELL did you get a true flat sign!? Teach me your ways, sensei.
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Last edited by Jet Penguin : 12-14-2014 at 12:14 AM.
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Old 12-13-2014, 11:46 PM   #3
chrismendiola
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C(♭5).
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Old 12-14-2014, 06:55 AM   #4
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I have seen major b5 chords being used somewhere.

But a chord like that is most likely maj7#11, dom7#11 or dom7b5.
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Old 12-16-2014, 04:30 AM   #5
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Agree with guys above, if it doesn't extend beyond the b5 then it doesn't have a name. I usually encounter this particular voicing when using a lydian tonality and the F# would usually be a passing tone to resolve back to a major triad (i.e. to the G). Hope this helps somehow.
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Old 12-16-2014, 01:13 PM   #6
crazysam23_Atax
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggaraMarine
I have seen major b5 chords being used somewhere.

But a chord like that is most likely maj7#11, dom7#11 or dom7b5.

Usually, though, there's either a keyboard or 2nd guitar or something playing the rest of that chord. If the "chord"* above is played by itself, well...I don't even think it has a proper name.

*It's not really a chord, so much as a tonal cluster. Because it doesn't really make sense as a chord, imho.
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Old 12-16-2014, 04:45 PM   #7
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so your watching a video of Segovia playing Bach..and you hit pause..and his fingers are on the notes C E Gb..and you ask..what chord is that?...well..its like that .. its a isolated bit of harmony/melody via moving voices..that came form somewhere and is going somewhere else..it could be lots of things..or even a mistake!...

good practice is move the notes one at a time up or down and find a small melodic phrase..and try and link it to another chord you already know..

the study of moving voices/chord construction-harmony- would help you a lot in this area of finding a "reason" for such chords..as they could be part of a larger chord or just implied harmony..or a scale/melodic fragment that is not a chord at all..

you will discover "isolated chunks of harmony" many times -- its like having only several pieces of a jig saw puzzle and trying to guess what the picture looks like..

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